Tetsuya Nomura

Last updated

Tetsuya Nomura
Native name
野村 哲也
Born (1970-10-08) October 8, 1970 (age 48)
NationalityJapanese
OccupationVideo game artist, director, game designer
Employer Square Enix

Tetsuya Nomura(野村 哲也,Nomura Tetsuya, born October 8, 1970) is a Japanese video game artist, designer and director working for Square Enix (formerly Square). He designed characters for the Final Fantasy series, debuting with Final Fantasy VI and continuing with various later installments. Additionally, Nomura has led the development of the Kingdom Hearts series since its debut in 2002 and was the director for the CGI film Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children . [1]

Game art design is a subset of game development. It is the process of creating the artistic aspects for video games. Video game art design begins in the pre-production phase of creating a video game. The video game artists are visual artists involved from the conception of the game and they make rough sketches of the characters, setting, objects, etc. These starting concept designs can also be created by the game designers before the game is moved into actualization. Sometimes these are concept designs are called “programmer art”. After the rough sketches are completed and the game is ready to be moved forward those artists or more artists are brought in to bring these sketches to life through graphic design.

Square Enix Japanese video game company

Square Enix Holdings Co., Ltd. is a Japanese video game developer, publisher, and distribution company known for its Final Fantasy, Dragon Quest, and Kingdom Hearts role-playing video game franchises, among numerous others. Several of them have sold over 10 million copies worldwide, with the Final Fantasy franchise alone selling 144 million, the Dragon Quest franchise selling 78 million and the Kingdom Hearts franchise selling 30 million. The Square Enix headquarters are in the Shinjuku Eastside Square Building in Shinjuku, Tokyo. The company employs over 4300 employees worldwide.

Square Co., Ltd. was a Japanese video game company founded in September 1986 by Masafumi Miyamoto. It merged with Enix in 2003 to form Square Enix. The company also used SquareSoft as a brand name to refer to their games, and the term is occasionally used to refer to the company itself. In addition, "Square Soft, Inc" was the name of the company's American arm before the merger, after which it was renamed to "Square Enix, Inc".

Contents

Early life

Nomura's father influenced his interest in art and games early on, creating little drawings and unique Sugoroku board games for him. Nomura started drawing at the age of three years and developed his own Sugoroku games during his elementary school years. As a child, he spent much of his free time playing baseball, swimming, fishing and building fortresses. When he was in middle school, his father told him that an era of computers would come and bought him his own computer. Nomura played Legends of Star Arthur: Planet Mephius on it and started creating his own video games by learning programming. He first tried a Nintendo product with the tennis and ping-pong variant of the Color TV Game console and later borrowed a Family Computer in high school. Around that time, Dragon Quest became Nomura's favorite because it surprised him and introduced him to video games with story elements. His art teacher in high school pointed him towards the works of Final Fantasy illustrator Yoshitaka Amano. Nomura also created his own manga during class and intended to do this as a profession although he ultimately abandoned the idea. [2] Nomura went to vocational school to learn magazine and advertising artwork. [2] Nomura then looked for an advertising job at a publishing company. However, he eventually applied at Square after he had seen a job advertisement with a drawing by Yoshitaka Amano. [2]

<i>Sugoroku</i>

Sugoroku refers to two different forms of a Japanese board game: ban-sugoroku which is similar to western backgammon, and e-sugoroku which is similar to western Snakes and Ladders.

The Information Age is a historic period in the 21st century characterized by the rapid shift from traditional industry that the Industrial Revolution brought through industrialization, to an economy based on information technology. The onset of the Information Age can be associated with William Shockley, Walter Houser Brattain and John Bardeen, the inventors and engineers behind the first transistors, revolutionising modern technologies.

Computer programming Process that leads from an original formulation of a computing problem to executable computer programs

Computer programming is the process of designing and building an executable computer program for accomplishing a specific computing task. Programming involves tasks such as: analysis, generating algorithms, profiling algorithms' accuracy and resource consumption, and the implementation of algorithms in a chosen programming language. The source code of a program is written in one or more languages that are intelligible to programmers, rather than machine code, which is directly executed by the central processing unit. The purpose of programming is to find a sequence of instructions that will automate the performance of a task on a computer, often for solving a given problem. The process of programming thus often requires expertise in several different subjects, including knowledge of the application domain, specialized algorithms, and formal logic.

Career

1990s

In the early 1990s, Nomura was hired by Square and at first worked as a debugger for Final Fantasy IV . [3] [4] Some time later, the company's staff was divided and he was placed in the team in charge of Final Fantasy. [4] After he had received some training by artist Tetsuya Takahashi, Nomura designed the monsters for Final Fantasy V . [5] [4] [6] At that time, each Final Fantasy developer had their own plan book as a compilation of ideas to present to the director of a game. While the others typed their plan books at the computer and then printed them out, Nomura wrote his by hand and attached many drawings which impressed director Hironobu Sakaguchi and event planner Yoshinori Kitase. [4] Nomura then became the graphic director of Final Fantasy VI . [5] For this game, he conceived the characters Shadow and Setzer as well as their background stories. [7] Their designs were reused from some of Nomura's abandoned concepts for Final Fantasy V. [4] Following several smaller projects, Nomura was asked to be the principal character designer of Final Fantasy VII in replacement for Amano. [8] Nomura drew the game's characters in a stylized and super deformed way and came up with the idea for the "Limit Break" attacks. [9] [10] He also took part in the making of the story and had a hand in plot elements such as Aerith's death. [5] [6] In 1998, Nomura worked on both Parasite Eve and Brave Fencer Musashi . He then designed characters and monsters for Final Fantasy VIII in what he described as his "actual style of drawing", working alongside art director Yusuke Naora to realize the more realistic approach to the game's graphics. [10] Additionally, he wrote the character's background stories and was the battle visual director in charge of designing fight sequences. [5] [10] Afterwards, Nomura worked on several different projects for Square, for example as a character designer of the 1998 fighting game Ehrgeiz which also used characters from Final Fantasy VII.

<i>Final Fantasy IV</i> video game

Final Fantasy IV, known as Final Fantasy II for its initial North American release, is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Released in 1991, it is the fourth main installment of the Final Fantasy series. The game's story follows Cecil, a dark knight, as he tries to prevent the sorcerer Golbez from seizing powerful crystals and destroying the world. He is joined on this quest by a frequently changing group of allies. Final Fantasy IV introduced innovations that became staples of the Final Fantasy series and role-playing games in general. Its "Active Time Battle" system was used in five subsequent Final Fantasy games, and unlike prior games in the series, IV gave each character their own unchangeable character class.

Tetsuya Takahashi is currently the head of his own game development company Monolith Soft, Inc. In the past, Takahashi has worked at Square, participating on such games as Final Fantasy V, Final Fantasy VI and Chrono Trigger. His most notable works are those within the Xenogears (Square), Xenosaga and Xenoblade Chronicles series, all of which he directed. He is married to Soraya Saga, who also worked with him at Square Enix, as well as on Xenogears, Xenosaga, and Soma Bringer. He is the co-founder and director of Monolith Soft.

<i>Final Fantasy V</i> video game

Final Fantasy V is a medieval-fantasy role-playing video game developed and published by Square in 1992 as a part of the Final Fantasy series. The game first appeared only in Japan on Nintendo's Super Famicom. It has been ported with minor differences to Sony's PlayStation and Nintendo's Game Boy Advance. An original video animation produced in 1994 called Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals serves as a sequel to the events depicted in the game. It was released for the PlayStation Network on April 6, 2011, in Japan. An enhanced port of the game, with new high-resolution graphics and a touch-based interface, was released for iPhone and iPad on March 28, 2013, and for Android on September 25, 2013.

2000s

Nomura was the character designer for 2000's beat 'em up The Bouncer before he returned to the Final Fantasy series in the same capacity with 2001's Final Fantasy X . He worked with the staff so that the characters' clothes would be identical in full motion videos and in-game scenes, unlike in Final Fantasy VIII, [8] In February 2000, he started working as the director of Kingdom Hearts with the production team consisting of over one hundred members from both Square and Disney Interactive. [11] Nomura first heard of the game during a discussion between Shinji Hashimoto and Hironobu Sakaguchi regarding the use of the character of Mickey Mouse in a video game. He was inspired to work on Kingdom Hearts by Nintendo's platforming game Super Mario 64 . After discussing with the Disney staff, Nomura convinced them to use original characters with him as the character designer. [12] The game's protagonist, Sora, became his favorite character he had designed so far. [13] Following Kingdom Hearts, Nomura worked once again on the Final Fantasy series with Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy X-2 .

Beat 'em up is a video game genre featuring hand-to-hand combat between the protagonist and an improbably large number of opponents. Traditional beat 'em ups take place in scrolling, two-dimensional (2D) levels, though some later games feature more open three-dimensional (3D) environments with yet larger numbers of enemies. These games are noted for their simple gameplay, a source of both critical acclaim and derision. Two-player cooperative gameplay and multiple player characters are also hallmarks of the genre. Most of these games take place in urban settings and feature crime-fighting and revenge-based plots, though some games may employ historical, science fiction or fantasy themes.

<i>The Bouncer</i> (video game) 2000 video game

The Bouncer is a 2000 beat 'em up video game for the PlayStation 2 co-developed by Squaresoft and DreamFactory. It was published in Japan by Squaresoft in December 2000, in North America by Square Electronic Arts in March 2001, and in Europe by Sony Computer Entertainment Europe in June 2001. The game was produced by Shinji Hashimoto, co-directed by Takashi Tokita and Seiichi Ishii, and features character designs by Tetsuya Nomura, and music by Noriko Matsueda and Takahito Eguchi.

<i>Final Fantasy X</i> video game

Final Fantasy X is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square as the tenth entry in the Final Fantasy series. Originally released in 2001 for Sony's PlayStation 2, the game was re-released as Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster for PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Vita in 2013, for PlayStation 4 in 2015, Microsoft Windows in 2016, and for Nintendo Switch and Xbox One in 2019. The game marks the Final Fantasy series transition from entirely pre-rendered backdrops to fully three-dimensional areas, and is also the first in the series to feature voice acting. Final Fantasy X replaces the Active Time Battle (ATB) system with the "Conditional Turn-Based Battle" (CTB) system, and uses a new leveling system called the "Sphere Grid".

For the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII metaseries which featured new titles based on Final Fantasy VII, Nomura was once again the character designer. A sequel to Kingdom Hearts started development around the completion of Kingdom Hearts Final Mix , an international version which added more foreshadowing elements regarding the series' plot. [14] Nomura continued his work on the series with Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories for the Game Boy Advance in 2004. He had originally planned to work directly on the PlayStation 2 sequel Kingdom Hearts II . However, desire from fans to play the original game on a portable console resulted in the creation of Chain of Memories which would bridge the gap between Kingdom Hearts and Kingdom Hearts II. [15] Afterwards, Nomura was the director and lyricist for the CGI animated film Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children which was released in 2005 in Japan. This marked his film debut, and he redesigned the characters as well. Nomura joined the film's crew after producer Yoshinori Kitase called him and eventually became the director because of his attachment to the character of Cloud Strife. [16] [17] He split the role of directing with Takeshi Nozue. [18]

<i>Compilation of Final Fantasy VII</i> media franchise

The Compilation of Final Fantasy VII is a metaseries produced by Square Enix. A subseries stemming from the main Final Fantasy series, it is a collection of video games, animated features and short stories based in the world and continuity of Final Fantasy VII. Officially announced in 2003 with the reveal of Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, the series' core products are three video games and one movie release. Alongside these are tie-in products and spin-offs including books, mobile games and an original video animation. Advent Children and the mobile title Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII are a sequel and prequel to VII, respectively focusing on Cloud Strife, the original game's main protagonist, and covert operatives known as the Turks. Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII follows the story of Zack Fair, an important major character in VII, while Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII, which acts as a sequel to Advent Children, follows Vincent Valentine, one of the original's optional characters.

<i>Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories</i> video game

Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories is an action role-playing video game developed by Jupiter and published by Square Enix in 2004 for the Game Boy Advance. The game serves as an intermediary between the two larger-scale PlayStation 2 games in the Kingdom Hearts series. It was one of the first GBA games to incorporate full motion video (FMV). The game was remade into a PlayStation 2 game titled Kingdom Hearts Re:Chain of Memories, which was released in Japan as a second disc packaged with Kingdom Hearts II Final Mix in March 2007. The remake was released in North America on December 2, 2008.

<i>Kingdom Hearts II</i> 2005 video game

Kingdom Hearts II is a 2005 action role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the PlayStation 2 video game console. The game is a sequel to Kingdom Hearts, and like the original game, combines characters and settings from Disney films with those of Square Enix's Final Fantasy series. The game's popularity has resulted in a novel and manga series based upon it and a Japan-exclusive re-released version of the game featuring extra content, Kingdom Hearts II Final Mix, released in March 2007.

Kingdom Hearts II was released in 2005, resolving the elements foreshadowed in the first game's secret ending. As a result of being set a year after previous titles, Nomura was careful to make the plot accessible to newcomers. [19] After Square Enix had finished development of the updated version Kingdom Hearts II Final Mix+, Nomura was approached by Disney which expressed interest in a sequel. He said "We have various ideas, but we're not at the point where we can say that." [20] Wishing to stop using the character of Sora temporarily, Nomura instead wanted to continue the series with games that explained different subplots. This resulted in the creation of Kingdom Hearts 358/2 Days for the Nintendo DS in 2008 which explored events that set up the story of Kingdom Hearts II. [21] In mid-2007, Nomura mentioned a desire to create a spin-off Kingdom Hearts game on a mobile platform and wanted it to play slightly differently from other titles in the series. The resulted was Kingdom Hearts coded , a game set after the events of Kingdom Hearts II, which was later remade for the Nintendo DS in 2010. [22]

<i>Kingdom Hearts 358/2 Days</i> video game

Kingdom Hearts 358/2 Days is an action role-playing video game developed by h.a.n.d. and Square Enix for the Nintendo DS. It is the fifth installment in the Kingdom Hearts series, and takes place near the end of the first game, continuing parallel to Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories. The game was released worldwide in 2009. The story is told from the perspective of Roxas, following his daily life within Organization XIII and his relationship with fellow Organization member Axel; it also introduces a fourteenth member, Xion, who becomes friends with the former two.

In the meantime, Nomura was also responsible for the main character designs and orchestration of The World Ends with You for the Nintendo DS. In 2009, he was also the main character designer of Final Fantasy XIII . The graphics capabilities of the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 compared to previous consoles allowed Nomura to use more complex elements in the character designs than before, such as Lightning's cape and detailed facial features. This in turn meant that the art team had to do much more work for each character or area than in previous games. Nomura did not take an involved role in the creation of the non-playable characters. [23] In 2008, he was the character designer of Dissidia Final Fantasy . The game was originally envisioned by Nomura as a Kingdom Hearts spin-off featuring a cast of Disney characters. He later felt uncomfortable with the Disney characters fighting each other and instead opted to use Final Fantasy characters. [24] Nomura was responsible for the character designs, which changed much of the look and style of Amano's illustrations. [25] [26]

2010s

In 2010, Square released Kingdom Hearts Birth By Sleep , a prequel of the first Kingdom Hearts that explained scenes shown in Kingdom Hearts II and its updated version. [21] In early 2011, Square released a follow up to Dissidia titled Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy . The game carried several ideas Nomura had ever since early development, such as the inclusion of new characters and new gameplay mechanics. [27] For 2011's Final Fantasy XIII-2 , Nomura only created the new characters' faces as other staff members designed their clothes. [28] Once the Kingdom Hearts coded remake was released, Nomura and his companions had already thought about creating Kingdom Hearts 3D: Dream Drop Distance , a game that would set up the events of Kingdom Hearts III . The game was released for the Nintendo 3DS owing to the team's positive reaction to the console's quality. [29] [30] Nomura confirmed that he would be considering what he called an "HD Technical Test" in order to commemorate the series' tenth anniversary and to entice players new to the series. [31] This occurred on March 3, 2012 in the form of a premiere event where footage from the game, including its full CGI introduction sequence, was showcased to celebrate the game's release. [32] In May 2012, Nomura revealed he was working as the director of a new Kingdom Hearts game that had yet to be announced by Square Enix. [33] He was directing Final Fantasy XV which originally entered production as Final Fantasy Versus XIII shortly before its announcement in May 2006. [34] [35] Nomura left his position of director on Final Fantasy XV following "changes in development structure" by Square Enix in December 2013. [36] After his departure from Final Fantasy XV, development of Final Fantasy VII Remake began, with Nomura directing the project and other key members of the original Final Fantasy VII development team, Kitase and Kazushige Nojima returning as producer and scenario writer. At E3 2015, Final Fantasy VII Remake was announced with Nomura confirmed to be the director of the game. Nomura designed the "Torna" organization for Xenoblade Chronicles 2 , finally working with Tetsuya Takahashi again who had wanted to work with Nomura for over 20 years since it was decided Nomura would work on Final Fantasy VII instead of Xenogears . [37]

Style

Nomura considers Yoshitaka Amano one of his biggest inspirations when doing artwork. [8] His four "seniors" Hironobu Sakaguchi, Yoshinori Kitase, Hiroyuki Ito and Tetsuya Takahashi were also described as major influences. [38] He even compared Sakaguchi to something "like a godly figure" during his early days at Square. At that time, Nomura was also taught the basics of game design by Ito. He told Nomura never to stick to existing concepts but rather to reuse just specific ideas and explained concepts such as ease of control and effortless accessibility of magic spells. [4] Ito's work as a battle system designer inspires Nomura when thinking of the gameplay system for the Kingdom Hearts games. [38] When designing characters, Nomura wants their names and outfits to be related with their personalities. An example occurs in Final Fantasy X where the protagonist Tidus was given a colorful uniform in order to reflect his cheerful personality and to contrast with the previous moody Final Fantasy characters. His name as well as Yuna's, another character appearing in the game, also have a common theme, the former being Okinawan for "Sun" and the latter Okinawan for "night". [8] Various characters such as Squall Leonheart and Lulu are given multiple accessories, making the games more challenging for the programmers. [8] When directing Advent Children, Nomura explained how the film was different from Western films due to the lack of direct answers from the plot. He added that he wants viewers to interpret certain scenes themselves and then discuss them with friends as another way to enjoy the film. [18] The same occurs within the Kingdom Hearts series where the scenes that show unknown characters are left to the player's imagination until the following scene reveals it. [39]

Works

ReleaseTitleRole(s)
1991 Final Fantasy IV Debugger [3]
1992 Final Fantasy V Battle graphics, monster designs [6]
1994 Final Fantasy VI Graphic director, character design [7]
Live A Live Tosa-ben translation
1995 Front Mission Graphic designer
Chrono Trigger Field graphic
1996DynamiTracerConcept design
Super Mario RPG Special thanks
1997 Final Fantasy VII Character design, battle visual director
1998 Ehrgeiz Character supervisor
Parasite Eve Main character design
Brave Fencer Musashi Character illustration
1999 Final Fantasy VIII Character design, battle visual director, monster design, story [10]
Parasite Eve II Character illustration
2000 The Bouncer Character designer
2001 Final Fantasy X Character designer
2002 Kingdom Hearts Director, concept design, main character designer, storyboard designer, base story [40]
Final Fantasy XI Hume and Elvaan design, story NPC design
2003 Final Fantasy X-2 Main character designer
2004 Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII Concept, character design
Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories Director, concept design, scenario supervisor, character designer, base story [41]
2005 Musashi: Samurai Legend Main character designer
Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children Director, character designer
Last Order: Final Fantasy VII Supervising director
Kingdom Hearts II Director, concept design, base story, 2D character art: main artist
2006 Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII Character designer
Mario Hoops 3-on-3 Graphic supervisor
Dirge of Cerberus Lost Episode: Final Fantasy VII Character designer
MonotoneConcept design, character design
Final Fantasy V Advance Monster design
Final Fantasy VI Advance Graphics supervisor
2007 The World Ends with You Creative producer, character designer
Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Creative producer, character designer
2008 Kingdom Hearts coded Director, concept design, story
Dissidia Final Fantasy Creative producer, character designer
EllarkCharacter design, creator's design: demon equipment
2009 Kingdom Hearts 358/2 Days Director, concept design, story, 2D art: main artist
Final Fantasy XIII Main character designer
2010 Kingdom Hearts Birth by Sleep Director, concept design, story, 2D art: main artist
Kingdom Hearts Re:coded Director, concept design, story, 2D art: main artist
Mario Sports Mix Special thanks
The 3rd Birthday Creative producer, character designer, concept design [42]
2011 Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy Creative producer, character designer
Final Fantasy Type-0 Creative producer, character designer
Final Fantasy XIII-2 Main character designer
2012 Theatrhythm Final Fantasy Creative producer
Kingdom Hearts 3D: Dream Drop Distance Director, concept design, story, 2D art: main artist
2013 Final Fantasy All the Bravest Creative producer, original concept
Kingdom Hearts HD 1.5 Remix Director, concept design, story, 2D art: main artist
Kingdom Hearts χ Director
Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII Main character designer
2014 Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call Creative producer
Final Fantasy Record Keeper Creative producer, character design, concept designer
Gunslinger Stratos 2 "Riccardo Martini" and "Sakura Ayanokoji" character design
Puzzle & Dragons Battle Tournament Main character designer
Kingdom Hearts HD 2.5 Remix Director, concept design, story, 2D art: main artist
Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U Character designer (2015 Cloud Strife DLC)
2015 Mobius Final Fantasy Collaborative event support
Rampage Land RankersCharacter designer
Kingdom Hearts Unchained χ Director
Dissidia Final Fantasy Creative producer, character designer
2016Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: All-Star CarnivalCreative producer, character designer
World of Final Fantasy Creative producer, [43] character designer
Final Fantasy XV Lyrics, original concept, original director, [lower-alpha 1] lead character design [44]
2017 Kingdom Hearts HD 2.8 Final Chapter Prologue Director, concept design, story, 2D art: main artist
Dissidia Final Fantasy: Opera OmniaCreative producer, character designer
Tekken 7 Main character design (2018 Noctis Lucis Caelum DLC)
Final Fantasy XIV: Stormblood Special thanks
Terra Battle 2 Guardian character design
Itadaki Street: Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy 30th Anniversary Final Fantasy character supervisor
Final Fantasy Dimensions II Special thanks
Xenoblade Chronicles 2 "Torna" character design
World of Final Fantasy: Meli-MeloCreative producer, character design
2018 Dissidia Final Fantasy NT Creative producer, character designer
Final Fantasy XV: Pocket Edition Lyrics, original concept, main character design
Idol FantasyCharacter design [45]
Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Cloud Strife character design
2019 Kingdom Hearts III Director, concept design, story, main 2D character designer [46]
2020 Final Fantasy VII Remake Director, character designer [47]

Accolades

Nomura received the "Excellence in Visual Arts" award by the International Game Developers Association for his work on the first Kingdom Hearts game, alongside Shinji Hashimoto. [48] In IGN's "The Top 100 Video Game Creators of all Time" Nomura was listed at number 84. [5]

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Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy is a 2011 fighting game published by Square Enix for the PlayStation Portable as part of the Final Fantasy series. It was developed by the company's 1st Production Department and released in Japan on March 3, 2011. The game is both a prequel and remake of Dissidia Final Fantasy, revealing what occurred before the events of its predecessor, and was released on March 22, 2011 in North America.

Isamu Kamikokuryo Japanese video game artist

Isamu Kamikokuryo is a Japanese video game artist who worked at Square Enix until his resignation on March 31, 2017. He is known for his work on the company's role-playing video game series Final Fantasy, for which he designed locations and characters. Among others, he was involved in the Ivalice Alliance and Fabula Nova Crystallis franchises. Kamikokuryo had initially planned to become an oil painter and illustrator but was inspired to join the video game industry by the release of Final Fantasy VII. His influences as an artist include realist painter Andrew Wyeth and photojournalist Steve McCurry. Kamikokuryo draws inspiration from his photography hobby and world travels.

<i>Theatrhythm Final Fantasy</i> 2012 video game

Theatrhythm Final Fantasy is a rhythm video game, developed by indieszero and published by Square Enix for Nintendo 3DS and iOS. Based on the Final Fantasy video game franchise, the game involves using the touch screen in time to various pieces of music from the series. The game was released in Japan in February 2012, and in North America, Australia and Europe in July 2012. An iOS version was released in December 2012. A sequel, Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call, was released in 2014. A third game based on the Dragon Quest series, Theatrhythm Dragon Quest, was released in 2015. An arcade game, Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: All-Star Carnival, was released in 2016.

Jun Akiyama is a Japanese video game event director and scenario writer who works at Square Enix. He joined the predecessor company Square in 1995. In his role as event planner for Final Fantasy VII, Akiyama was responsible for the story elements and cutscenes involving the characters Red XIII and Yuffie Kisaragi, respectively. During his work as the event director of Vagrant Story, he intended to make the transitions between gameplay and event scenes as smooth as possible. The fully polygonal graphics of the game entailed precise camera movements, character animations and the usage of different lens effects.

<i>Final Fantasy VII Remake</i> upcoming video game

Final Fantasy VII Remake is an upcoming action role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the PlayStation 4. Split across multiple releases, the first part is scheduled for March 3, 2020. The game is a remake of the 1997 PlayStation game Final Fantasy VII, following mercenary Cloud Strife as he and eco-terrorist group AVALANCHE battle against the corrupt Shinra megacorporation and the rogue former Shinra soldier Sephiroth. Gameplay is planned to combine real-time action similar to Dissidia Final Fantasy with other strategic elements.

Final Fantasy is a media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and developed and owned by Square Enix. The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs). The eponymous first game in the series, published in 1987, was conceived by Sakaguchi as his last-ditch effort in the game industry; the title was a success and spawned sequels. While most entries in the series are separate from each other, they have recurring elements carrying over between entries: these include plot themes and motifs, gameplay mechanics such as the Active Time Battle (ATB) system, and signature character designs from the likes of Yoshitaka Amano and Tetsuya Nomura.

References

  1. Nomura was the director of the project until December 2013
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