Thälmann Mountains

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The Thälmann Mountains ( 72°0′S4°45′E / 72.000°S 4.750°E / -72.000; 4.750 Coordinates: 72°0′S4°45′E / 72.000°S 4.750°E / -72.000; 4.750 ) are a group of mountains in the Mühlig-Hofmann Mountains between Flogeken Glacier and Vestreskorve Glacier, in Queen Maud Land. They were mapped by the Norsk Polarinstitutt from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and also mapped by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition in 1961 and named for Ernst Thälmann, a German communist leader in the 1920s. [1]

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References

  1. "Thälmann Mountains". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2015-12-01.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thälmann Mountains" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).