Théâtre des Jeunes-Artistes

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Facade of the Jeunes-Artistes Theatre des Jeunes Artistes - Kaufmann 1837 plate5 (elevation).jpg
Facade of the Jeunes-Artistes
Plan of the Jeunes-Artistes Theatre des Jeunes Artistes - Kaufmann 1837 plate5 (plan).jpg
Plan of the Jeunes-Artistes

The Théâtre des Jeunes-Artistes was an 18th-century Parisian entertainment venue, now defunct, inaugurated in 1790 at 52 rue de Bondy (modern rue René-Boulanger) in the 10th arrondissement of Paris. It had a capacity of 520 spectators. [1]

10th arrondissement of Paris French municipal arrondissement in Île-de-France, France

The 10th arrondissement of Paris is one of the 20 arrondissements of the capital city of France. In spoken French, this arrondissement is referred to as dixième.

Contents

History

Built on the site of the former Théâtre des Variétés-Amusantes on the northwest corner of the intersection of the rue de Bondy with the rue de Lancry, the theatre was inaugurated on 26 June 1790 under the name Théâtre Français Comique et Lyrique. It took the name Jeunes-Artistes in 1794 under the direction of Jacques Robillon who set up a troupe of child actors modeled on that of the Théâtre de l'Ambigu-Comique, which faced it (the idea was again taken over by Louis Comte and his Théâtre des Jeunes-Élèves in 1820).

The Théâtre des Variétés-Amusantes was a theatre company in Paris.

Théâtre de lAmbigu-Comique theater

The Théâtre de l’Ambigu-Comique, a former Parisian theatre, was founded in 1769 on the boulevard du Temple immediately adjacent to the Théâtre de Nicolet. It was rebuilt in 1770 and 1786, but in 1827 was destroyed by fire. A new, larger theatre with a capacity of 2,000 as compared to the earlier 1,250 was built nearby on the boulevard Saint-Martin at its intersection with the rue de Bondy and opened the following year. The theatre was eventually demolished in 1966.

Louis Comte French magician

Louis Apollinaire Christien Emmanuel Comte "The King's Conjurer", also known simply as Comte, was a celebrated nineteenth-century Parisian magician, greatly admired by Robert-Houdin.

Despite the great success it enjoyed, the theatre was closed following the Napoleonic decree of 8 August 1807 on the limitation of Parisian theaters.

On 10 thermidor year 15, Napoleon I of France signed a decree reducing the number of theatres in Paris to eight, giving the force of law to a decree of the interior minister of 25 April that same year. This measure cut short an expansion in theatres.

See also

Notes

  1. Wild 1989, pp. 212–215.

Bibliography

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Coordinates: 48°52′08″N2°21′35″E / 48.86875°N 2.35976°E / 48.86875; 2.35976

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

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