Théâtre des Variétés

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Théâtre des Variétés
TheatreVarietes.jpg
The théâtre des Variétés, c. 1820
Theatre des Varietes
Address7, boulevard Montmartre, 2nd.
Paris
France
Construction
Opened1807;214 years ago (1807)
ArchitectJacques Cellerier, Jean-Antoine Alavoine
Website
www.theatre-des-varietes.fr

The Théâtre des Variétés is a theatre and "salle de spectacles" at 7–8, boulevard Montmartre, 2nd arrondissement, in Paris. It was declared a monument historique in 1974.

Contents

History

It owes its creation to the theatre director Mademoiselle Montansier (Marguerite Brunet). Imprisoned for debt in 1803 and frowned upon by the government, a decree of 1806 ordered her company to leave the Théâtre du Palais-Royal which then bore the name of "Variétés". The decree's aim was to move out Montansier's troupe to make room for the company from the neighbouring Théâtre-Français, which had stayed empty even as the Variétés-Montansier had enjoyed immense public favour. Strongly unhappy about having to leave the theatre by 1 January 1807, the 77-year-old Montansier gained an audience with Napoleon himself and received his help and protection. She thus reunited the "Société des Cinq", which directed her troupe, in order to found a new theatre, the one which stands at the side of the passage des Panoramas. It was inaugurated on 24 June 1807. The theatre plays a prominent role in Émile Zola's 1880 novel, Nana , as it is the theatre in which the title character achieves celebrity in the opening chapters.

Other activities

In 2012 the theatre began to host technical conferences such as dotJS or dotScale. [1]

Premieres at the theatre

The theatre des Varietes in 2012 Theatre des varietes.JPG
The théâtre des Variétés in 2012

Directors

See also

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References

  1. "DotJS".

Coordinates: 48°52′16″N2°20′31″E / 48.87111°N 2.34194°E / 48.87111; 2.34194