Théâtre des Variétés-Amusantes

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The Théâtre des Variétés-Amusantes was a theatre company in Paris.

History

In 1778, Louis Lécluse (or Lécluze), a former actor at the Opéra-Comique turned dentist, opened a theatre at foire Saint-Laurent, which shortly afterwards he transferred to the boulevard du Temple, at the corner of rue de Lancry and rue de Bondy (now rue René-Boulanger, Xe arrondissement).

Théâtre de la foire is the collective name given to the theatre put on at the annual fairs at Saint-Germain and Saint-Laurent in Paris.

Boulevard du Temple boulevard in Paris, France

The Boulevard du Temple, formerly nicknamed the "Boulevard du Crime", is a thoroughfare in Paris that separates the 3rd arrondissement from the 11th. It runs from the Place de la République to the Place Pasdeloup, and its name refers to the nearby Knights Templars' Temple where they established their Paris priory.

Unable to bear the hostility this new enterprise generated, Lécluse ceded his theatre and its company to three former dancers of the Opéra – Fierville fils, Malter and Hamoir – as well as the financier Lemercier. The theatre opened on 12 April 1779 and it attracted large audiences by its varied and well-performed repertoire. Dorvigny wrote several plays for it, including Janot ou les Battus paient l'amende (11 June 1779), which was a great success.

François Duval, known as Malter, was a French dancer.

Jean Malter, known as Hamoir, was a French ballet dancer and theatre director. He was one of the last of the Malter family, an 18th-century dynasty of dancers.

Louis-François Archambault, stage name Dorvigny, was a French novelist, actor and playwright, and the inventor of "janotism".

In 1784, the theatre's directors had their privilege revoked by a Conseil d'État decree, in favour of Gaillard and Dorfeuille, after a complaint from the Académie royale de Musique. The new directors moved the theatre to the Palais-Royal and opened their new building on 1 January 1785, under the name Variétés du Palais-Royal. Its fare until that date had been farces, which they replaced with comedies, welcoming Monvel and Julie Candeille, then Talma, Dugazon and Mme Vestris. From then on the theatre was renamed the Théâtre-Français de la rue Richelieu, then the Théâtre de la République .

Palais-Royal palace and an associated garden located in the 1st arrondissement of Paris

The Palais-Royal, originally called the Palais-Cardinal, is a former royal palace located in the 1st arrondissement of Paris, France. The screened entrance court faces the Place du Palais-Royal, opposite the Louvre. In 1830 the larger inner courtyard of the palace, the Cour d'Honneur, was enclosed to the north by what was probably the most famous of Paris's covered arcades, the Galerie d'Orléans. Demolished in the 1930s, its flanking rows of columns still stand between the Cour d'Honneur and the popular Palais-Royal Gardens.

Jacques Marie Boutet was a French actor and comic playwright from Lunéville. His pseudonym was Monvel. He was a small, thin man without good looks or voice, and yet he became one of the greatest comedians of his time.

François-Joseph Talma French actor

François Joseph Talma was a French actor.

Coordinates: 48°52′07″N2°21′36″E / 48.8686°N 2.3600°E / 48.8686; 2.3600

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

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