Théophile Funck-Brentano

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Théophile Funck-Brentano (21 August 1830 – 23 January 1906) was a Luxembourgian-French sociologist.

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He was the son of Jacques Funck, a notary in Luxembourg City that lived with Charles Metz, who was witness to Funck-Bretano's birth. [1] He was the father of Frantz Funck-Brentano.

Literary works

Notes

  1. Mersch, Jules (1963). "Les Metz: la Dynastie du Fer". In Mersch, Jules (ed.). Biographie nationale du pays de Luxembourg. Luxembourg City: Victor Buck. p. 430. Retrieved 24 August 2009.


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