Thérèse-Geneviève Coutlée

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Thérèse-Geneviève Coutlée (November 23, 1742 July 17, 1821) was a mother superior of the Sisters of Charity of the Hôpital Général of Montreal. She was succeeded by Marie-Marguerite Lemaire after her death.

Abbess female superior of a community of nuns, often an abbey

In Christianity, an abbess is the female superior of a community of nuns, which is often an abbey.

Marie-Marguerite Lemaire was a mother superior of the Sisters of Charity of the Hôpital Général of Montreal.


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