Thérèse Brulé

Last updated
Thérèse Brulé
Therese Brule 1919.jpg
Thérèse Brulé in 1919
Personal information
NationalityFlag of France.svg  France
Years active1912-1920
Sport
Event(s) High Jump
Club Femina Sport

Thérèse Brulé was a former French athlete who specialized in the high jump. Her sister Jeanne assumed the General Secretariat of the Fédération des sociétés féminines sportives de France(FSFSF) in 1920.

Contents

Historical

Thérèse Brulé, typist by trade, was with her sister Jeanne and the other sisters Liébrard one of the founders, on July 27, 1912, of Femina Sport, which included Mrs. Faivre Bouvot as the first president. [1] During the great War, they strove to improve gender codes of the day which confined the activities of women in rhythmic gymnastics and athletic sports. This club then established itself as the bastion of sportif feminism, of which Germaine Delapierre, graduate in philosophy, and Alice Milliat were the main organisers. [2] At their instigation the office Fédération des sociétés féminines sportives de France(FSFSF) became exclusively female in 1920 and Therese's sister Jeanne becomes on the General Secretary. [3]

Sporting career

A versatile sportswomen, Therese Brule participated in July 1917 in the first female French Athletic Championships at the stadium of the porte Brancion in Paris. In 1921 she participated at the 1921 Women's Olympiad in Monaco and also in the runners-up 1922 Women's Olympiad and 1923 Women's Olympiad.

Performances

On the occasion of the championships, she establishes French athletic records in 4 events: [3]

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References

  1. "Fémina Sport". Archived from the original on 2016-04-11.
  2. "Le football : vecteur de l'émancipation féminine". Archived from the original on 2016-03-04.
  3. 1 2 "Chronique de l'athlétisme féminin". Archived from the original on 2016-03-03.