Thérèse Coffey

Last updated

2019–2023
  1. As Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State from 2016 to July 2019.

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Thérèse Coffey
MP
Therese Coffey Official Cabinet Portrait, September 2022 (cropped).jpg
Official portrait, 2022
Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
In office
6 September 2022 25 October 2022
Preceded by Rory Stewart
Succeeded by Rebecca Pow
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by Member of Parliament
for Suffolk Coastal

2010–present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by Assistant Government Whip
2014–2015
Succeeded by
Preceded by Deputy Leader of the House of Commons
2015–2016
Succeeded by
Preceded by Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Environment and Rural Opportunity
2016–2019
Succeeded by
Herself
as Minister of State for Environment and Rural Opportunity
Preceded by
Herself
as Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Environment and Rural Opportunity
Minister of State for Environment and Rural Opportunity
2019
Succeeded by
Preceded by Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
2019–2022
Succeeded by
Preceded by Deputy Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
2022
Succeeded by
Preceded by Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
2022
Succeeded by
Preceded by Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2022–2023