Thérèse de Moëlien

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Thérèse de Moëlien (1759–1793) was a French counter-revolutionary and agent during the French Revolution.

French Revolution social and political revolution in France and its colonies occurring from 1789 to 1798

The French Revolution was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France and its colonies beginning in 1789. The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution profoundly altered the course of modern history, triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies. Through the Revolutionary Wars, it unleashed a wave of global conflicts that extended from the Caribbean to the Middle East. Historians widely regard the Revolution as one of the most important events in human history.

She was the cousin of the counter revolutionary Charles Armand Tuffin, marquis de la Rouërie. She was member and financier of the counter-revolutionary organisation Association Bretonne and active to gain supporters to it. After the arrest of Tuffin she was arrested and executed by guillotine.

Charles Armand Tuffin, marquis de la Rouërie French cavalry officer

Charles Armand Tuffin, marquis de la Rouërie, also known in the United States as "Colonel Armand", was a Breton cavalry officer who served under the American flag during the American War of Independence. He was promoted to brigadier general after the Battle of Yorktown. He is also known as one of the early leaders of the Breton Association during the French Revolution.

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Claude François Chauveau-Lagarde French lawyer

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Paul François de Quelen de La Vauguyon or Paul François de Quélen de Stuer de Caussade, duc de La Vauguyon was a French nobleman. He was governor of Cognac, after having been involved in the last campaigns of the Seven Years' War. He wrote a Portrait de feu monseigneur le Dauphin and was menin to the future Louis XVI, one of the Dauphin's sons. A peer of France, brigadier, maréchal de camp, knight of the ordre du Saint-Esprit, he was chosen to be minister plenipotentiary to the Estates General of the Dutch Republic. He later became French ambassador to Spain, knight of the Golden Fleece, temporary minister of foreign affairs in 1789, then minister of the conseil d'État of Louis XVIII in Verona. He was the main intermediary among Louis's agents in France, but became the victim of intrigues. From the Restoration onwards he was lieutenant général and sat in the peerage of France, where he was noted for his moderation. He and his wife had four children, but the Quelen line died out with his children.

Pauline Léon, was a radical organizer and feminist during the French Revolution.

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Women in the French Revolution

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Counter-revolutionary someone who opposes a revolution

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This is a listing of some of the works of Jean Fréour.

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