Théziers

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Théziers
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A view of Théziers
Blason de la ville de Theziers (30).svg
Coat of arms
Location of Théziers
Theziers
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Théziers
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Théziers
Coordinates: 43°54′00″N4°37′18″E / 43.9°N 4.6217°E / 43.9; 4.6217 Coordinates: 43°54′00″N4°37′18″E / 43.9°N 4.6217°E / 43.9; 4.6217
Country France
Region Occitanie
Department Gard
Arrondissement Nîmes
Canton Redessan
Intercommunality Pont du Gard
Government
  Mayor (20082014) Alain Carriere
Area
1
11.34 km2 (4.38 sq mi)
Population
 (2017-01-01) [1]
1,039
  Density92/km2 (240/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
30328 /30390
Elevation10–129 m (33–423 ft)
(avg. 20 m or 66 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

Théziers is a commune in the Gard department in the Occitanie region in southern France.

Contents

History

Théziers was founded in the 6th century BC by Greek colonists, who, after they had founded the coastal town of Marseille (Greek: Μασσαλία), advanced inland to found smaller colonies in the periphery. The ancient name of the town was Tedusia (Greek: Θεδουσία), under which the town was known during the Roman times. It was a fortified settlement situated on a hill, which was captured by the Celts during their invasions in the 2nd century BC. Gradually the Romans occupied the Gaul and expelled the Celts, while the settlement evolved as a Gallo-Roman village.

Population

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1962640    
1968678+5.9%
1975659−2.8%
1982674+2.3%
1990844+25.2%
1999883+4.6%
20081,016+15.1%

See also

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References

  1. "Populations légales 2017". INSEE . Retrieved 6 January 2020.