Thēthi

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Thēthi [lower-alpha 1] (also Romanized as Thati) is a dialect of the Maithili language. [1] It is spoken mainly in Kosi, Purnia and Munger divisions of Bihar, India and in some adjoining districts of Nepal. [2] It is spoken by 1,65,420 people in India as per the 2011 census. [3]

The term dialect is used in two distinct ways to refer to two different types of linguistic phenomena:

Maithili language Indo-Aryan language spoken in India and Nepal

Maithili is an Indo-Aryan language native to the Indian subcontinent, mainly spoken in India and Nepal. In India, it is spoken in the states of Bihar and Jharkhand and is one of the 22 recognised Indian languages. In Nepal, it is spoken in the eastern Terai and is the second most prevalent language of Nepal. It is also one of the 122 recognized Nepalese languages. Tirhuta was formerly the primary script for written Maithili. Less commonly, it was also written in the local variant of Kaithi. Today it is written in the Devanagari script.

Kosi division Division of Bihar in India

Kosi division is an administrative geographical unit of Bihar state of India. Saharsa is the administrative headquarters of the division. Currently (2005), the division consists of Saharsa district, Madhepura district, and [[Supaul district]].

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Bhojpuri language Indo-Aryan language native to India and Nepal

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Awadhi language Indo-Aryan language spoken in India

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Kishanganj district District of Bihar in India

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Maithils, also known as Maithili people, are an Indo-Aryan ethno-linguistic group from the Indian subcontinent, who speak the Maithili language as their native language. They inhabit the Mithila region, which comprises Tirhut, Darbhanga, Kosi, Purnia, Munger, Bhagalpur and Santhal Pargana divisions of India and some adjoining districts of Nepal. The Maithil homeland forms an important part of Hindu mythology as it is said to be the birthplace of Sita, the wife of Ram.

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Sadri (Nagpuri) is an Eastern Indo-Aryan language spoken in the Indian states of Jharkhand, Bihar, Chhattisgarh and Odisha. It is sometimes considered a Hindi dialect. It is the native language of the Sadan. It is used as lingua franca by many tribal groups such as Kharia, Munda, Bhumij and Kurukh, and a number of speakers of these tribal groups have adopted it as their first language. It is also used as a lingua franca among Tea-tribes of Assam, West Bengal and Bangladesh. According to the 2011 Census, there were approximately 5,130,000 native speakers of the Nagpuri language, including 19,100 identifying as Gawari, 4,350,000 as "Sadan/Sadri" and 763,000 as "Nagpuria".

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Bajjika is a language spoken in eastern India and Nepal, considered by some, including the Ethnologue, to be a dialect of the Maithili language. In Nepal, it has been accorded an independent language status with censuses recording it separately from Maithili and thus is one of its national languages through the constitution of Nepal 2015. It is spoken in the north-western districts of the Bihar state of India, and the adjacent areas in Nepal.

The Tharu or Tharuhat languages are any of the Indo-Aryan languages spoken by the Tharu people of the Terai region in Nepal, and neighboring regions of Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh and Bihar in India.

Surjapuri, a language possessing similarities with Kamatapuri, Assamese, Bengali and Maithili, is mainly spoken in the parts of Purnia division of Mithila region of Bihar. Apart from Bihar, it is also spoken in West Bengal, as well as in parts of eastern Nepal. It is one of the lesser known Bihari languages spoken in Eastern India comprising today's northern West Bengal and Eastern Bihar. It is associated with Kamtapuri language spoken in North Bengal and Western Assam.

Khortha is a language spoken in the Indian state of Jharkhand, mainly in 16 districts of two divisions: North Chotanagpur and Santhal Pargana. The 13 districts are Hazaribagh, Koderma, Giridih, Bokaro, Dhanbad, Chatra, Ramgarh, Deoghar, Dumka, Sahebganj, Pakur, Godda, and Jamtara. Khortha is not only spoken by the Sadaans, it is also used by the Adivasis as a link.. It is most spoken language of Jharkhand,and considered a dialect of Magahi by linguists, Grierson has called this as eastern magahi.

Angika (अंगिका) or Chhika-Chhiki is a language spoken primarily in the Bihar and Jharkhand states of India and the Terai region of Nepal.It belongs to the Eastern Indo-Aryan language family. It is closely related to languages such as Bengali, Assamese, Oriya, Maithili and Magahi.

Maithili Wikipedia edition of the free-content encyclopedia

The Maithili Wikipedia is the Maithili language version of Wikipedia, run by the Wikimedia Foundation. The site was launched on November 6, 2014. Tirhuta was formerly the primary script for written Maithili. Less commonly, it was also written in the local variant of Kaithi. Today it is written in the Devanagari script. Maithili is an Indo-Aryan language spoken in the Bihar and Jharkhand states of India and is one of the 22 recognised Indian languages which is also spoken in the eastern Terai of Nepal and is the second most prevalent language of Nepal. It is also one of the 122 recognized Nepalese languages.

Nepali language Lingua franca of Nepal; one of the scheduled languages of India

Nepali is an Indo-Aryan language of the sub-branch of Eastern Pahari. It is the official language of Nepal and one of the 22 scheduled languages of India. Also known by the endonym Khas kura, the language is also called Gorkhali or Parbatiya in some contexts, It is spoken mainly in Nepal and by about a quarter of the population in Bhutan. In India, Nepali has official status in the state of Sikkim, and significant number of speakers in the states of Arunachal Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, Manipur, Mizoram, Uttarakhand and West Bengal's Darjeeling district. It is also spoken in Burma and by the Nepali diaspora worldwide. Nepali developed in proximity to a number of Indo-Aryan languages, most notably the other Pahari languages and Maithili, and shows Sanskrit influence. However, owing to Nepal's location, it has also been influenced by Tibeto-Burman languages. Nepali is mainly differentiated from Central Pahari, both in grammar and vocabulary, by Tibeto-Burman idioms owing to close contact with this language group.

References

Notes

  1. also known as Thēth or Thethiya

Citations

  1. https://www.ethnologue.com/language/mai
  2. Ray, K. K. (2009). Reduplication in Thenthi Dialect of Maithili Language. Nepalese Linguistics 24: 285–290.
  3. http://www.censusindia.gov.in/2011Census/Language-2011/Statement-1.pdf