Thừa Thiên (empress)

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Thừa Thiên Cao Hoàng Hậu
承天高皇后
Empress Thừa Thiên
Empress consort of Nguyễn Dynasty
Reign1806 - 1814
Predecessornone
Successor Empress Thuận Thiên
BornJanuary 19, 1762
Tống Sơn district, Thanh Hóa province
DiedFebruary 22, 1814(1814-02-22) (aged 52)
Phú Xuân, Việt Nam
Burial
SpouseEmperor Gia Long
IssueNguyễn Phúc Chiêu
Nguyễn Phúc Cảnh, Crown Prince Anh Duệ
Full name
Tống Phúc Thị Lan (宋福氏蘭)
Posthumous name
Thừa Thiên Tá Thánh Hậu Đức Từ Nhân Giản Cung Tề Hiếu Dục Chính Thuận Nguyên Cao hoàng hậu
承天佐聖厚德慈仁簡恭齊孝翼正順元高皇后
House Nguyễn Dynasty
FatherTống Phúc Khuông
MotherLady Lê

Empress Thừa Thiên (Vietnamese : Thừa Thiên Cao Hoàng Hậu; 承天高皇后, 1762–1814), born Tống Phúc Thị Lan (宋福氏蘭), was the first wife of Nguyễn Phúc Ánh (future Emperor Gia Long) and mother of Crown Prince Nguyễn Phúc Cảnh.

She was a daughter of general Tống Phước Khuông of Nguyễn lords. Nguyễn Ánh married her when he was at the age of 18. Empress Thừa Thiên had two sons with Gia Long: Nguyen Phuc Chieu (who died after several days) and Crown Prince Nguyễn Phúc Cảnh. After her death, she was buried at Gia Long's Thiên Thọ tomb, alongside the Emperor.

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