The Acrobat

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The Acrobat
The Acrobat film.jpg
Directed by Jean Boyer
Written by
Starring
Cinematography
Edited by Louisette Hautecoeur
Music by Georges Van Parys
Production
company
Les Films Harlé
Distributed byCCFC
Release date
27 June 1941
Running time
90 minutes
CountryFrance
Language French

The Acrobat (French: L'acrobate) is a 1941 French comedy film directed by Jean Boyer and starring Fernandel, Jean Tissier and Thérèse Dorny. [1]

Contents

It was made at the Victorine Studios in Nice, in the Unoccupied Zone of France. The film's art direction was by Paul-Louis Boutié and Guy de Gastyne.

Cast

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References

  1. Lorcey p.208

Bibliography