The Adventures of Tintin (TV series)

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The Adventures of Tintin
The Adventures of Tintin (TV).jpg
Genre Action
Adventure
Mystery
Comedy-drama
Created by Hergé (characters)
Developed byStéphane Bernasconi
Voices of(English version)
Colin O'Meara
David Fox
Wayne Robson
John Stocker
Dan Hennessey
Susan Roman
(French version)
Thierry Wermuth
Christian Pelissier
Henri Labussiere
Yves Barsacq
JeanasPierre Moulin
Susan Roman
Theme music composerRay Parker
Tom Szczesniak
ComposersRay Parker
Jim Morgan
Tom Szczesniak
Country of origin France
Canada
Original languagesFrench
English
No. of seasons3
No. of episodes39 (13 in each season)
Production
Executive producersMichael Hirsh
Patrick Loubert
Clive A. Smith
Phillipe Gildas
Pierre Bertrand-Jaume
Simon Hart
ProducerRobert Rea
Production location Brussels
Running time22 minutes (approx. per episode)
Production companies Nelvana Limited
Ellipse Programmé
Release
Original network FR3/France 3 (France)
Global Television Network (Canada)
HBO (United States)
Original release2 October 1991 (1991-10-02) 
28 September 1992 (1992-09-28)
External links
Website

The Adventures of Tintin is a Canadian/French animated TV show co-produced, written and animated in France by Ellipse Programmé and in Canada by Nelvana Limited, based on The Adventures of Tintin by Belgian comic artist Georges Prosper Remi, more commonly known by his pen name Hergé (French pronunciation:  [ɛʁʒe] ). [1] 39 half-hour episodes were produced over the course of its three seasons. It aired from 1991 to 1992.

Contents

History

The television series was directed by French director Stephen Bernasconi, with Peter Hudecki as the Canadian unit director. Hudecki was the primary director, but could not be credited as such due to co-production restrictions. It was produced by Ellipse (France) and Nelvana (Canada) on behalf of the Hergé Foundation. [2] It was the first television adaptation of Hergé's books since the Belgian animation company Belvision was responsible for Hergé's Adventures of Tintin twenty years earlier. Philippe Goddin, an expert on Hergé and Tintin, acted as a consultant to the producers. The series' writers included: Toby Mullally, Eric Rondeaux, Martin Brossolet, Amelie Aubert, Dennise Fordham, and Alex Boon.

Production

The series used traditional animation techniques [3] and adhered closely to the original books, going so far as to transpose some frames from the original books directly to screen. [4] In the episodes "Destination Moon" and "Explorers on the Moon", 3D animation was used for the moon rocket—an unusual step in 1989. Each frame of the animation was then printed and recopied onto celluloid, hand painted in gouache, and then laid onto a painted background. The rocket seen in the title sequence is animated using the same 3D techniques.

Artistically, the series chose a constant style, unlike in the books. In the books, the images had been drawn over the course of 47 years, during which Hergé's style developed considerably. However, later televised episodes, such as the "Moon" story and "Tintin in America", clearly demonstrated the artists' development during the course of the production of the television series. The series' original production language was English, but all visuals (road signs, posters, and settings) remained in French.

Changes from the books

Certain areas of the stories posed difficulties for the producers, who had to adapt features of the books to a more modern young audience. Nevertheless, this series was far more faithful to the books than Hergé's Adventures of Tintin, which had been made from 1959 to 1963.

The high amount of violence, death and the use of firearms were toned down or removed completely.

Haddock's penchant for whisky posed a problem for audience sensitivities. While the original books did not promote alcohol, they featured it heavily, with much humor based around it and the results of drinking. However, in many countries where the producers hoped to sell the series, alcoholism is a sensitive issue. Therefore, international versions of the series had some alterations. Haddock is seen drinking, but not as heavily as in the books. The Crab with the Golden Claws is the only adventure where Haddock's drunken state is not reduced. Also Tintin finds the Japanese Policeman earlier, chained to a post on the ship and gagged. However he is told to leave as he cannot free him in time. In Tintin in Tibet, Haddock is seen taking a nip from a flask of whisky in order to set up a scene in which Snowy is tempted to lap up some spilled whisky and subsequently falls over a cliff. In Tintin and the Picaros, Haddock is the only person taking wine with dinner, foreshadowing the use of Calculus' tablets to "cure" the drunken Picaros. Haddock is also seen drinking in The Calculus Affair and in Explorers on the Moon, setting up the scene where he leaves the rocket in a drunken state. He does not hide the bottle in a book of Astronomy, like he did in the book, but keeps the bottle in the refrigerator, making it less obvious for young viewers that it's alcohol.

Throughout the books, Snowy is frequently seen to be "talking". It is understood that his voice is only heard through the "fourth wall", but this verbal commentary is completely absent in the television series. The only time it's maintained is in the ending of "Flight 714" and he "speaks" with Tintin's voice.

Smaller changes were made due to the necessity for simplification or audience requirements:

Most of the newspaper parts which are in the books were replaced with either the news from the radio or television.

Stories not adapted

Three of the Tintin books were not included in the animated series. These were the first two Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (due to its unflattering portrayal of Russians) and Tintin in the Congo (due to issues around animal abuse and its racist colonial attitude towards the native Congolese) and the final Tintin and Alph-Art (due to it being incomplete).

Music

The underscore music and the main title theme for the series were written by composers Ray Parker and Tom Szczesniak. The music was recorded by engineer James Morgan. Excerpts from the score were released by Lé Studio Ellipse on CD and cassette in conjunction with Universal Music Group, on the StudioCanal label. It is now out of print in both formats.

Hergé's cameo appearances

Hergé, the creator of Tintin, makes a number of Hitchcock-like cameo appearances in the cartoon series—as he often did in the original books. Most of the time he is just a passing figure in the street, such as when he is checking his watch in The Blue Lotus or a reporter (The Broken Ear) or a technician (Explorers on the Moon). These brief appearances, however, are not sporadic as he is featured in all of the TV episodes. His letter box can even be seen next to Tintin's in The Crab with the Golden Claws. Other cameos are less flattering: he is a gangster in Tintin in America and an inmate at the lunatic asylum in Cigars of the Pharaoh, along with his fellow artist and collaborator Edgar P. Jacobs. [5]

Releases

Online platforms

The series is now available on Amazon Prime and Netflix (in certain territories) having been remastered into 1080p widescreen high definition.

Home video

Voice artists

English (The Adventures of Tintin)

French (Les Aventures de Tintin)

German (Die Abenteuer von Tim und Struppi)

Dutch (De Avonturen Van Kuifje)

Italian (Le Avventure di Tintin)

Spanish (Spain) (Las Aventuras de Tintín)

Portuguese (Brazil) (As Aventuras de Tintim)

Danish

Swedish

Finnish

Norwegian

Icelandic (Ævintýri Tinna)

Episodes

Running order of the TV series as per original broadcast schedule.

Season 1

  1. "The Crab with the Golden Claws": Part 1
  2. "The Crab with the Golden Claws": Part 2
  3. "The Secret of the Unicorn": Part 1
  4. "The Secret of the Unicorn": Part 2
  5. "Red Rackham's Treasure"
  6. "Cigars of the Pharaoh": Part 1
  7. "Cigars of the Pharaoh": Part 2
  8. "The Blue Lotus": Part 1
  9. "The Blue Lotus": Part 2
  10. "The Black Island": Part 1
  11. "The Black Island": Part 2
  12. "The Calculus Affair": Part 1
  13. "The Calculus Affair": Part 2

Season 2

  1. "The Shooting Star"
  2. "The Broken Ear": Part 1
  3. "The Broken Ear": Part 2
  4. "King Ottokar's Sceptre": Part 1
  5. "King Ottokar's Sceptre": Part 2
  6. "Tintin in Tibet": Part 1
  7. "Tintin in Tibet": Part 2
  8. "Tintin and the Picaros": Part 1
  9. "Tintin and the Picaros": Part 2
  10. "Land of Black Gold": Part 1
  11. "Land of Black Gold": Part 2
  12. "Flight 714": Part 1
  13. "Flight 714": Part 2

Season 3

  1. "The Red Sea Sharks": Part 1
  2. "The Red Sea Sharks": Part 2
  3. "The Seven Crystal Balls": Part 1
  4. "The Seven Crystal Balls": Part 2
  5. "Prisoners of the Sun": Part 1
  6. "Prisoners of the Sun": Part 2
  7. "The Castafiore Emerald": Part 1
  8. "The Castafiore Emerald": Part 2
  9. "Destination Moon": Part 1
  10. "Destination Moon": Part 2
  11. "Explorers on the Moon": Part 1
  12. "Explorers on the Moon": Part 2
  13. "Tintin in America"

Reception

Along with fans, critics have praised the series for being "generally faithful" to the originals, with compositions having been actually taken directly from the panels in the original comic books. [6]

See also

Related Research Articles

<i>Cigars of the Pharaoh</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Cigars of the Pharaoh is the fourth volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the series of comic albums by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. Commissioned by the conservative Belgian newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle for its children's supplement Le Petit Vingtième, it was serialised weekly from December 1932 to February 1934. The story tells of young Belgian reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, who are travelling in Egypt when they discover a pharaoh's tomb filled with dead Egyptologists and boxes of cigars. Pursuing the mystery of these cigars, they travel across Arabia and India, and reveal the secrets of an international drug smuggling enterprise.

<i>The Red Sea Sharks</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

The Red Sea Sharks is the nineteenth volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comic series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. The story was initially serialised weekly in Belgium's Tintin magazine from October 1956 to January 1958 before being published in a collected volume by Casterman in 1958. The narrative follows the young reporter Tintin, his dog Snowy, and his friend Captain Haddock as they travel to the fictional Middle Eastern kingdom of Khemed with the intention of aiding the Emir Ben Kalish Ezab in regaining control after a coup d'état by his enemies, who are financed by slave traders led by Tintin's old nemesis Rastapopoulos.

Bianca Castafiore Comic character by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Bianca Castafiore, the "Milanese Nightingale", is a fictional character in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. She is an opera singer who aggravates particularly Captain Haddock as she pops up in adventure after adventure. Castafiore is comically portrayed as narcissistic, whimsical, absent-minded, and talkative, and seems unaware that her voice is shrill and appallingly loud. She is also wealthy, generous and essentially amiable, and has a will of iron.

<i>The Castafiore Emerald</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

The Castafiore Emerald is the twenty-first volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. It was serialised weekly from July 1961 to September 1962 in Tintin magazine. In contrast to the previous Tintin books, Hergé deliberately broke the adventure formula he had created: it is the only book in the series where the characters remain at Marlinspike Hall, Captain Haddock's family estate, and neither travel abroad nor confront dangerous criminals. The plot concerns the visit of the opera singer Bianca Castafiore and the subsequent theft of her emerald.

<i>Flight 714 to Sydney</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Flight 714 to Sydney is the twenty-second volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. It was serialised weekly from September 1966 to November 1967 in Tintin magazine. The title refers to a flight that Tintin and his friends fail to catch, as they become embroiled in their arch-nemesis Rastapopoulos' plot to kidnap an eccentric millionaire from a supersonic business jet on a Sondonesian island.

<i>Red Rackhams Treasure</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Red Rackham's Treasure is the twelfth volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. The story was serialised daily in Le Soir, Belgium's leading francophone newspaper, from February to September 1943 amidst the German occupation of Belgium during World War II. Completing an arc begun in The Secret of the Unicorn, the story tells of young reporter Tintin and his friend Captain Haddock as they launch an expedition to the Caribbean to locate the treasure of the pirate Red Rackham.

Jolyon Wagg Comic character by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Jolyon Wagg is a fictional character in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. He is a gregarious, simple, and overbearing man who enters the story by barging in uninvited.

<i>Tintin and the Picaros</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Tintin and the Picaros is the twenty-third volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. The final instalment in the series to be completed by Hergé, in Belgium it was serialized in Tintin magazine from September 1975 to April 1976 before being published in a collected volume by Casterman in 1976. The narrative follows the young reporter Tintin, his dog Snowy and his friends Captain Haddock and Professor Calculus as they travel to the (fictional) South American nation of San Theodoros to rescue their friend Bianca Castafiore, who has been imprisoned by the government of General Tapioca. Once there, they become involved in the anti-government revolutionary activities of Tintin's old friend General Alcazar.

<i>Land of Black Gold</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Land of Black Gold is the fifteenth volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. The story was commissioned by the conservative Belgian newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle for its children's supplement Le Petit Vingtième, in which it was initially serialised from September 1939 until the German invasion of Belgium in May 1940, at which the newspaper was shut down and the story interrupted. After eight years, Hergé returned to Land of Black Gold, completing its serialisation in Belgium's Tintin magazine from September 1948 to February 1950, after which it was published in a collected volume by Casterman in 1950. Set on the eve of a European war, the plot revolves around the attempts of young Belgian reporter Tintin to uncover a militant group responsible for sabotaging oil supplies in the Middle East.

<i>The Calculus Affair</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

The Calculus Affair is the eighteenth volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by the Belgian cartoonist Hergé. It was serialised weekly in Belgium's Tintin magazine from December 1954 to February 1956 before being published in a single volume by Casterman in 1956. The story follows the attempts of the young reporter Tintin, his dog Snowy, and his friend Captain Haddock to rescue their friend Professor Calculus, who has developed a machine capable of destroying objects with sound waves, from kidnapping attempts by the competing European countries of Borduria and Syldavia.

Edgar P. Jacobs Belgian comics artist

Edgard Félix Pierre Jacobs, better known under his pen name Edgar P. Jacobs, was a Belgian comic book creator, born in Brussels, Belgium. He was one of the founding fathers of the European comics movement, through his collaborations with Hergé and the graphic novel series that made him famous, Blake and Mortimer.

Professor Calculus Comic character by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Professor Cuthbert Calculus is a fictional character in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. He is Tintin's friend, an absent-minded professor and half-deaf physicist, who invents many sophisticated devices used in the series, such as a one-person shark-shaped submarine, the Moon rocket, and an ultrasound weapon. Calculus's deafness is a frequent source of humour, as he repeats back what he thinks he has heard, usually in the most unlikely words possible. He does not admit to being near-deaf and insists he is only a little hard of hearing in one ear.

Tintin and the Blue Oranges is a 1964 Franco-Spanish film directed by Philippe Condroyer and starring Jean-Pierre Talbot as Tintin. It was the second live-action movie, with an original story based on characters from the comic book series The Adventures of Tintin, written and drawn by the Belgian artist Hergé. The accompanying book version is in photos and text rather than the usual comic-book style.

<i>Hergés Adventures of Tintin</i> Animated television series

Hergé's Adventures of Tintin is the first animated television series based on Hergé's popular comic book series, The Adventures of Tintin. The series was produced by Belvision Studios and first aired in 1957. After two books were adapted in black and white, eight books were then adapted in colour, each serialised into a set of five-minute episodes, with 103 episodes produced.

Tintin postage stamps

This is a list of postage stamps, released in Belgium and in other countries around the world, honoring The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé.

Captain Haddock Comic character by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Captain Archibald Haddock is a fictional character in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. He is one of Tintin's best friends, a seafaring pipe-smoking Merchant Marine Captain.

Michael Farr is a British expert on the comic series The Adventures of Tintin and its creator, Hergé. He has written several books on the subject as well as translating several others into English. A former reporter, he has also written about other subjects.

References

  1. Elsworth, Peter C. T. (24 December 1991). "Tintin Searches for a U.S. Audience". The New York Times. Retrieved 25 August 2010.
  2. Perlmutter, David (2018). The Encyclopedia of American Animated Television Shows. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 428–429. ISBN   978-1538103739.
  3. "Popular Belgian comic-strip character 'Tintin' to get mega-boost on U.S. cable TV". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 25 August 2010.
  4. Erickson, Hal (2005). Television Cartoon Shows: An Illustrated Encyclopedia, 1949 Through 2003 (2nd ed.). McFarland & Co. pp. 851–852. ISBN   978-1476665993.
  5. "Hergé's cameo appearances". Tintinologist.org. 27 March 2009. Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  6. Lofficier & Lofficier 2002, p. 90.

Further reading