The Brute (1961 film)

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The Brute
Directed by Zoltán Fábri
Written by Zoltán Fábri
Imre Sarkadi
Starring Ferenc Bessenyei
CinematographyFerenc Szécsényi
Edited byFerencné Szécsényi
Release date
  • 25 May 1961 (1961-05-25)
Running time
96 minutes
CountryHungary
LanguageHungarian

The Brute (Hungarian : Dúvad) is a 1961 Hungarian film directed by Zoltán Fábri. It was entered into the 1961 Cannes Film Festival. [1]

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References

  1. "Festival de Cannes: The Brute". festival-cannes.com. Retrieved 21 February 2009.