The Call of Youth

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The Call of Youth
Thecallofyouth-1921-newspaperad.jpg
A contemporary newspaper advertisement.
Directed by Hugh Ford
Written by Henry Arthur Jones (play "James the Fogey")
Eve Unsell
Starring Mary Glynne
Cinematography Hal Young
Distributed by Famous Players–Lasky British Producers
Release date
  • 13 March 1921 (1921-03-13)
Running time
39 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageSilent with English intertitles

The Call of Youth is a 1921 British short romance film directed by Hugh Ford. Alfred Hitchcock is credited as a title designer. [1] The film is now lost. It was made at Islington Studios by the British subsidiary of the American company Famous Players–Lasky.

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References

  1. "Progressive Silent Film List: The Call of Youth". Silent Era. Retrieved 20 April 2008.