The Crowns

Last updated
The Crowns
Tournament information
Location Tōgō, Aichi, Japan
Established1960
Course(s) Nagoya Golf Club, Wagō Course
Par70
Length6,557 yards (5,996 m)
Tour(s) Japan Golf Tour
Prize fund ¥120,000,000
Month playedApril/May
Tournament record score
Aggregate260 Masashi Ozaki (1995)
To par−20 as above
Current champion
Flag of Japan.svg Hiroshi Iwata
Location Map
Japan natural location map with side map of the Ryukyu Islands.jpg
Icona golf.svg
Nagoya GC
Location in Japan
Aichi geolocalisation relief.svg
Icona golf.svg
Nagoya GC
Location in Aichi Prefecture

The Crowns (中日クラウンズ, Chūnichi kuraunzu) is a professional golf tournament that is played over Nagoya Golf Club's Wagō Course in Tōgō, Aichi, Japan. Founded in 1960, it has been an event on the Japan Golf Tour schedule since the tour's first season in 1973.

Contents

History

The Crowns was established as the Invitation by Chūbu Japan, All Japan Amateur and Professional Golf Championship (中部日本招待全日本アマ・プロゴルフ選手権) in 1960. [1] The concept of the championship was competition among amateur and professional golf players. It has been played over the Wagō Course at Nagoya Golf Club every year except between 1962 and 1965, during which time it was held at Aichi Country Club (1962 and 1965) and Miyoshi Country Club (1963 and 1964).

From the 10th anniversary in 1969 to the 50th anniversary in 2009, the tournament's official name was "International Invitational Golf THE CROWNS (国際招待ゴルフ 中日クラウンズ, Kokusai shōtai gorufu Chūnichi kuraunzu)", as organizers invited international golfers. Winners during this time include major champions Peter Thomson, David Graham, Scott Simpson, Greg Norman, Seve Ballesteros, Davis Love III, Darren Clarke and Justin Rose.

The tournament record is 260 (20 under par), set by Masashi Ozaki in 1995. In 2010, Ryo Ishikawa recorded a Tour record final round of 58 (12 under par) to take the title by five strokes. From 2002 to 2019 the purse was ¥120,000,000 with ¥24,000,000 going to the winner. This was reduced to ¥100,000,000 in 2021.

Winners

YearWinnerScoreTo parMargin of
victory
Runner(s)-up
The Crowns
2021 Flag of Japan.svg Hiroshi Iwata 198 [lower-alpha 1] −123 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Katsumasa Miyamoto
2020 Cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic
2019 Flag of Japan.svg Katsumasa Miyamoto 271−91 stroke Flag of Japan.svg Shugo Imahira
2018 Flag of South Korea.svg Yang Yong-eun 268−124 strokes Flag of South Korea.svg Hwang Jung-gon
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Anthony Quayle
2017 Flag of Japan.svg Yūsaku Miyazato 267−131 stroke Flag of Japan.svg Yoshinori Fujimoto
Flag of Japan.svg Toru Taniguchi
2016 Flag of South Korea.svg Kim Kyung-tae 270−10Playoff Flag of Japan.svg Daisuke Kataoka
2015 Flag of South Korea.svg Jang Ik-jae 270−104 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Tomohiro Kondo
Flag of Japan.svg Hideto Tanihara
Flag of Japan.svg Kazuhiro Yamashita
2014 Flag of South Korea.svg Kim Hyung-sung 269−114 strokes Flag of South Korea.svg Jang Ik-jae
2013 Flag of Japan.svg Michio Matsumura 278−21 stroke Flag of Japan.svg Hideki Matsuyama
2012 Flag of South Korea.svg Jang Ik-jae 272−82 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg Steven Conran
Flag of Japan.svg Yoshikazu Haku
2011 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Brendan Jones 271−9Playoff Flag of South Korea.svg Jang Ik-jae
2010 Flag of Japan.svg Ryo Ishikawa 267−135 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Hiroyuki Fujita
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Paul Sheehan
2009 Flag of Japan.svg Tetsuji Hiratsuka 263−177 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Kenichi Kuboya
2008 Flag of Japan.svg Tomohiro Kondo 271−9Playoff Flag of Japan.svg Hiroyuki Fujita
2007 Flag of Japan.svg Hirofumi Miyase 278−2Playoff Flag of Japan.svg Toru Taniguchi
2006 Flag of Japan.svg Shingo Katayama 262−182 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Nozomi Kawahara
2005 Flag of Japan.svg Naomichi Ozaki 269−11Playoff Flag of Australia (converted).svg Steven Conran
2004 Flag of Japan.svg Shingo Katayama 264−162 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg Paul Sheehan
2003 Flag of Japan.svg Hidemasa Hoshino 270−103 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Toshimitsu Izawa
Flag of Myanmar (1974-2010).svg Zaw Moe
Flag of Japan.svg Taichi Teshima
2002 Flag of England.svg Justin Rose 266−145 strokes Flag of Thailand.svg Prayad Marksaeng
2001 Ulster Banner.svg Darren Clarke 267−134 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Keiichiro Fukabori
Flag of Japan.svg Shinichi Yokota
2000 Flag of Japan.svg Hidemichi Tanaka 272−85 strokes Flag of Japan.svg Mitsutaka Kusakabe
1999 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Yasuharu Imano 271−91 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Naomichi Ozaki
1998 Flag of the United States.svg Davis Love III 269−118 strokes Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Rick Gibson
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masanobu Kimura
Flag of the United States.svg Brian Watts
1997 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki 267−132 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Brian Watts
1996 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki 268−124 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Katsuyoshi Tomori
1995 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki 260−205 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Nobuo Serizawa
1994 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Roger Mackay 269−112 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Naomichi Ozaki
1993 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Peter Senior 270−101 stroke Flag of the United States.svg Gary Hallberg
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki
1992 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki 270−104 strokes Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Brent Franklin
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Peter Senior
1991 Flag of Spain.svg Seve Ballesteros 275−51 stroke Flag of Australia (converted).svg Roger Mackay
1990 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Noboru Sugai 276−4Playoff Flag of the United States.svg Steve Pate
1989 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Greg Norman 272−83 strokes Flag of the United States.svg Blaine McCallister
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Koichi Suzuki
1988 Flag of the United States.svg Scott Simpson 278−23 strokes Flag of the United States.svg David Ishii
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki
1987 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki 268−126 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Isao Aoki
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Ian Baker-Finch
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masahiro Kuramoto
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Yoshitaka Yamamoto
Chunichi Crowns
1986 Flag of the United States.svg David Ishii 274−64 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tsuneyuki Nakajima
1985 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Seiji Ebihara 276−42 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tsuneyuki Nakajima
1984 Flag of the United States.svg Scott Simpson 275−5Playoff Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Isao Aoki
1983 Flag of the Republic of China.svg Chen Tze-ming 280EPlayoff Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Kikuo Arai
Flag of the United States.svg David Ishii
1982 Flag of the United States.svg Gary Hallberg 272−83 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Shigeru Uchida
1981 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Graham Marsh 277−32 strokes Flag of the United States.svg D. A. Weibring
1980 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Isao Aoki 280E2 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg Graham Marsh
1979 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Isao Aoki 279−11 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tōru Nakamura
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Haruo Yasuda
1978 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Isao Aoki 270−105 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki
1977 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Graham Marsh 280E4 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Kenji Mori
1976 Flag of Australia (converted).svg David Graham 276−41 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Yasuhiro Miyamoto
1975 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Isao Aoki 272−81 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Teruo Sugihara
1974 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Takashi Murakami 272−86 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Masashi Ozaki
1973 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Isao Aoki 270−101 stroke Flag of the Republic of China.svg Lu Liang-Huan
1972 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Peter Thomson 266−146 strokes Flag of New Zealand.svg Terry Kendall
1971 Flag of the Republic of China.svg Lu Liang-Huan 274−63 strokes Flag of Australia (converted).svg Peter Thomson
1970 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Haruo Yasuda 268−123 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Teruo Suzumura
1969 Flag of Australia (converted).svg Peter Thomson 274−6Playoff Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tadashi Kitta
1968 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Haruo Yasuda 278−2Playoff Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Hisashi Suzumura
1967 Flag of the Republic of China.svg Hsieh Yung-yo 273−71 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Hisashi Suzumura
1966 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Shigeru Uchida 274−61 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tadashi Kitta
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Haruyoshi Kobari
1965 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tadashi Kitta 291−51 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Teruo Sugihara
1964 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Teruo Sugihara 294+61 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Torakichi Nakamura
1963 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Kenji Hosoishi 290+22 strokes Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Teruo Sugihara
1962 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tadashi Kitta 299+31 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Torakichi Nakamura
1961 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tomoo Ishii 280EPlayoff Flag of the United States.svg Orville Moody
1960 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Torakichi Nakamura 277−31 stroke Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Koichi Ono
  1. Shortened to 54 holes due to weather.

Source: [2] [3]

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References

  1. hicbc.com:中日クラウンズ 50年の歴史|第1回大会
  2. "The Crowns 2019 – Past Champions". Japan Golf Tour Organisation. Retrieved 11 March 2020.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. "The Crowns". Chubu-Nippon Broadcasting (in Japanese). Retrieved 11 March 2020.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)