The Emperor Jones (1955 film)

Last updated
The Emperor Jones
GenreDrama
Written by Eugene O'Neill (play)
Directed by Fielder Cook
Starring Ossie Davis
Rex Ingram
Country of originFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Original languageEnglish
Production
Running time60 minutes
Production company ABC
Release
Original release23 February 1955 (1955-02-23)
"The Emperor Jones"
Kraft Television Theatre episode
Episode no.Season 8
Episode 22
Production code404
Original air date23 February 1955
Episode chronology
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" Departure "
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" Half the World's a Bride "
List of Kraft Television Theatre episodes

The Emperor Jones is a 1955 film adaptation of the 1920 Eugene O'Neill play of the same title produced for the Kraft Television Theatre anthology series. It was directed by Fielder Cook [1] and starred Ossie Davis in the title role.

Contents

O'Neill's play opened on Broadway, New York City, New York, USA at the Neighborhood Playhouse on 1 November 1920 and ran for 204 performances.

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References

  1. Roberts, Jerry (5 June 2009). Encyclopedia of Television Film Directors. ISBN   9780810863781.