The Faceless Voice

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The Faceless Voice
The Faceless Voice.png
Directed by Leo Mittler
Written by
Produced by André Haguet
Starring
Cinematography
Music by
Production
company
Vandor Film
Release date
  • 1 December 1933 (1933-12-01)
CountryFrance
LanguageFrench

The Faceless Voice (French: La voix sans visage) is a 1933 French drama film directed by Leo Mittler and starring Lucien Muratore, Véra Korène and Jean Servais. [1]

Contents

Plot

The singer Saltore is accused of murdering his wife's lover and sentenced to hard labor for ten years. He is proven innocent by his daughter when she discovers that his wife, who wanted to end an embarrassing affair, was the culprit.

Cast

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References

  1. Oscherwitz & Higgins p. 281

Bibliography