The Girl with the Wine Glass

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The Girl with the Wine Glass
(A Lady and Two Gentlemen)

Jan Vermeer van Delft 006.jpg

The Girl with the Wine Glass (Dame en twee heren)
Artist Johannes Vermeer
Year 1659–1660
Location Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum, Braunschweig

The Girl with the Wine Glass (Dame en twee heren) is a 1659-1660 painting by Johannes Vermeer, now in the Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum in Braunschweig.

Johannes Vermeer 17th-century Dutch painter

Johannes Vermeer was a Dutch Baroque Period painter who specialized in domestic interior scenes of middle-class life. He was a moderately successful provincial genre painter in his lifetime but evidently was not wealthy, leaving his wife and children in debt at his death, perhaps because he produced relatively few paintings.

Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum Art museum in Braunschweig, Germany

The Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum (HAUM) is an art museum in the German city of Braunschweig, Lower Saxony.

Braunschweig Place in Lower Saxony, Germany

Braunschweig, also called Brunswick in English, is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany, north of the Harz mountains at the farthest navigable point of the Oker River which connects it to the North Sea via the Aller and Weser Rivers. In 2016, it had a population of 250,704.

Contents

Painting materials

The pigment analysis done by Hermann Kühn [1] shows Vermeer's use of the expensive natural ultramarine in the tablecloth, lead-tin-yellow in the oranges on the table and madder lake and vermilion in the skirt of the woman. [2]

Ultramarine A deep blue color pigment which was originally made with ground lapis lazuli

Ultramarine is a deep blue color pigment which was originally made by grinding lapis lazuli into a powder. The name comes from the Latin ultramarinus, literally "beyond the sea", because the pigment was imported into Europe from mines in Afghanistan by Italian traders during the 14th and 15th centuries.

Lead-tin-yellow is a yellow pigment, of historical importance in oil painting, also known as the "Yellow of the Old Masters".

Vermilion color

Vermilion is both a brilliant red or scarlet pigment, originally made from the powdered mineral cinnabar, and the name of the resulting color. It was widely used in the art and decoration of Ancient Rome, in the illuminated manuscripts of the Middle Ages, in the paintings of the Renaissance, as sindoor in India, and in the art and lacquerware of China.

Notes

  1. Kühn, H. A Study of the Pigments and Grounds Used by Jan Vermeer. Reports and Studies in the History of Art, 1968, 154–202
  2. Johannes Vermeer, The Girl with a Wineglass', Colourlex

Further reading

Related Research Articles

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Umber is a natural brown or reddish-brown earth pigment that contains iron oxide and manganese oxide. Umber is darker than the other similar earth pigments, ochre and sienna.

Chrome yellow

Chrome yellow is lead(II) chromate (PbCrO4). It occurs naturally as the mineral crocoite but the mineral itself was never used as a pigment for paint. After the French chemist Louis Vauquelin discovered the new element chromium in 1797 lead chromate was synthesized in the laboratory and its use as a pigment began in the second decade of the nineteenth century.

Paris green chemical compound

Paris green is an inorganic compound. It is a highly toxic emerald-green crystalline powder that has been used as a rodenticide and insecticide, and also as a pigment, despite its toxicity. It is also used as a blue colorant for fireworks. The color of Paris green is said to range from a pale blue green when very finely ground, to a deeper green when coarsely ground.

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<i>Woman Holding a Balance</i> painting by Johannes Vermeer

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<i>Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window</i> painting by Johannes Vermeer

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<i>Woman with a Pearl Necklace</i> painting by Johannes Vermeer

Woman with a Pearl Necklace by Johannes Vermeer is a seventeenth-century Northern European painting. Painted in oils on canvas, Johannes Vermeer portrayed a young Dutch woman, most likely of upper-class-descent, dressing herself with two yellow ribbons, pearl earrings, and a pearl necklace. As a very popular artist of the 17th century, the Dutch Golden Age, Vermeer depicted many women in similar circumstances within interior, domestic scenes. The same woman also appears in The Love Letter and A Lady Writing a Letter.

<i>Girl with a Flute</i> painting attributed to Johannes Vermeer

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