The Hartlepools (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated

The Hartlepools
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
County County Durham
1868February 1974
Number of membersOne
Replaced by Hartlepool
Created from South Durham

The Hartlepools /ˈhɑːrtlɪpʊl/ was a borough constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament. The constituency became Hartlepool in 1974. The seat's name reflected the representation of both old Hartlepool and West Hartlepool.

Contents

History

The Hartlepools was enfranchised as a borough constituency by the Reform Act 1867, being given one MP. [1] It had previously been part of the two-MP county division of South Durham.

The constituency was renamed Hartlepool in 1974, following the administrative merger in 1967 of the local authorities covering the borough of Hartlepool and the county borough of West Hartlepool. [2]

Boundaries

1868–1918

The municipal borough of Hartlepool, and the townships of Throston, Stranton, and Seaton Carew. [1]

See map on Vision of Britain website. [3]

1918–1974

County borough of West Hartlepool and municipal borough of Hartlepool. [4]

Boundaries redrawn in 1918, 1950 and 1955 to reflect changes to the boundaries of the two boroughs. [5]

Members of Parliament

ElectionMember [6] Political partyOffices held
1868 Ralph Ward Jackson Conservative
1874 Thomas Richardson Liberal
1875 by-election Lowthian Bell Liberal
1880 Thomas Richardson Liberal
1886 Liberal Unionist
1891 by-election Christopher Furness Liberal
1895 Sir Thomas Richardson Liberal Unionist
1900 Sir Christopher Furness Liberal
1910 by-election Stephen Furness Liberal
1914 by-election Sir Walter Runciman Liberal
1918 W. G. Howard Gritten Unionist
1922 William Jowitt Liberal
1924 Sir Wilfrid Sugden Unionist
1929 W. G. Howard Gritten Unionist
1943 by-election Thomas George Greenwell Conservative
1945 D. T. Jones Labour
1959 John Kerans Conservative
1964 Ted Leadbitter Labour

Elections

Elections in the 1860s

General election 1868: The Hartlepools [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Ralph Ward Jackson 1,550 50.0
Liberal Thomas Richardson 1,54750.0
Majority30.0
Turnout 3,09779.0
Registered electors 3,922
Conservative win (new seat)

Elections in the 1870s

General election 1874: The Hartlepools [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Thomas Richardson 2,308 62.4 +12.4
Conservative Ralph Ward Jackson 1,39037.612.4
Majority91824.8N/A
Turnout 3,69881.7+2.7
Registered electors 4,524
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +12.4

Richardson resigned, causing a by-election.

By-election, 29 Jul 1875: The Hartlepools [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Lowthian Bell 1,982 53.5 8.9
Conservative William Joseph Young [8] 1,46439.5+1.9
Magna ChartaAhmed John Kenealy [9] [10] 2597.0New
Majority51814.010.8
Turnout 3,70576.94.8
Registered electors 4,820
Liberal hold Swing 5.4

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1880: The Hartlepools [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Thomas Richardson 1,965 37.2 25.2
Liberal Lowthian Bell 1,71732.5N/A
Conservative Thomas Hutchinson Tristram 1,59730.37.3
Majority1202.322.5
Turnout 5,27979.02.7
Registered electors 6,681
Liberal hold Swing 9.0
General election 1885: The Hartlepools [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Thomas Richardson 3,669 58.3 +21.1
Conservative Thomas Hutchinson Tristram 2,62941.7+11.4
Majority1,04016.6+14.3
Turnout 6,29874.14.9
Registered electors 8,500
Liberal hold Swing +7.2
General election 1886: The Hartlepools [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Unionist Thomas Richardson 3,381 57.8 +16.1
Liberal Mervyn Lanark Hawkes [12] 2,46942.2-16.1
Majority91215.6N/A
Turnout 5,85068.8-5.3
Registered electors 8,500
Liberal Unionist gain from Liberal Swing +16.1

Elections in the 1890s

1891 The Hartlepools by-election [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Christopher Furness 4,603 51.7 +9.5
Liberal Unionist William Gray4,30548.39.5
Majority2983.4N/A
Turnout 8,90885.8+17.0
Registered electors 10,378
Liberal gain from Liberal Unionist Swing +9.5
General election 1892: The Hartlepools [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Christopher Furness 4,626 50.4 +8.2
Liberal Unionist Thomas Richardson [n 1] 4,55049.68.2
Majority760.8N/A
Turnout 9,17687.3+18.5
Registered electors 10,513
Liberal gain from Liberal Unionist Swing +8.2
T. Richardson Thomas Richardson (Liberal Unionist).jpg
T. Richardson
General election 1895: The Hartlepools [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Unionist Thomas Richardson 4,853 50.4 +0.8
Liberal Christopher Furness 4,77249.6-0.8
Majority810.8N/A
Turnout 9,62587.5+0.2
Registered electors 10,999
Liberal Unionist gain from Liberal Swing +0.8

Elections in the 1900s

C. Furness Christopher Furness.jpg
C. Furness
General election 1900: The Hartlepools [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Christopher Furness 6,491 58.5 +8.9
Liberal Unionist Thomas Richardson 4,61241.58.9
Majority1,87917.0N/A
Turnout 11,10386.41.1
Registered electors 12,849
Liberal gain from Liberal Unionist Swing +8.9
General election 1906: The Hartlepools [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Christopher Furness Unopposed
Liberal hold

Elections in the 1910s

General election January 1910: The Hartlepools [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Christopher Furness 6,531 53.2 N/A
Conservative William Gritten 5,75446.8New
Majority7776.4N/A
Turnout 12,28589.6N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
S. Furness Stephen Furness.jpeg
S. Furness
1910 Hartlepool by-election [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Stephen Furness 6,159 50.7 -2.5
Conservative William Gritten 5,99349.3+2.5
Majority1661.4-5.0
Turnout 12,15288.6-1.0
Liberal hold Swing -2.5
General election December 1910: The Hartlepools [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Stephen Furness 6,017 50.2 -0.5
Conservative William Gritten 5,96949.8+0.5
Majority480.4-1.0
Turnout 11,93687.4-2.2
Liberal hold Swing -0.5

General Election 1914–15:

Another General Election was scheduled to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been preparing for this election, and by July 1914, the following candidates had been selected:

W. Runciman Sir Walter Runciman.jpg
W. Runciman
The Hartlepools by-election, 1914 [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Walter Runciman Unopposed
Liberal hold
General election 1918: The Hartlepools [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist William Gritten 13,003 51.3 +1.5
C Liberal Charles Macfarlane7,64730.1-20.1
Labour Will Sherwood 4,73318.6New
Majority5,35621.2N/A
Turnout 25,38364.1-23.3
Unionist gain from Liberal Swing
Cindicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.

Elections in the 1920s

General election 1922: The Hartlepools [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal William Jowitt 18,252 50.8 +20.7
Unionist William Gritten 17,68549.2-2.1
Majority5671.6N/A
Turnout 35,93787.2+13.1
Liberal gain from Unionist Swing +11.4
General election 1923: The Hartlepools [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal William Jowitt 17,101 46.4 -4.4
Unionist William Gritten 16,95646.1-3.1
Labour George Belt 2,7557.5New
Majority1450.3-1.3
Turnout 36,81287.5+0.3
Liberal hold Swing -0.7
General election 1924: The Hartlepools [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist Wilfrid Sugden 19,077 49.5 +3.4
Liberal William Jowitt 15,72440.8-5.6
Labour Craigie Aitchison 3,7179.7+2.2
Majority3,3538.7N/A
Turnout 38,51890.3+2.8
Unionist gain from Liberal Swing +4.5
General election 1929: The Hartlepools [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Unionist William Gritten 17,271 38.0 -11.5
Liberal Stephen Furness 17,13337.7-3.1
Labour Gilbert Oliver11,05224.3+14.6
Majority1380.3-8.4
Turnout 45,45685.9-4.4
Unionist hold Swing -4.2

Elections in the 1930s

General election 1931: The Hartlepools [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Gritten 30,842 68.1 +30.1
Labour Alasdair MacGregor 14,46231.9+7.6
Majority16,38036.2+35.9
Turnout 45,30484.4-1.5
Conservative hold Swing +15.0
General election 1935: The Hartlepools [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative William Gritten 21,828 47.8 -20.3
Labour Charles A. Goatcher16,93137.0+5.1
Liberal Joseph Scott-Cowell6,93915.2New
Majority4,89710.7-25.5
Turnout 45,69883.0-1.4
Conservative hold Swing -12.7

Elections in the 1940s

General Election 1939–40

A General Election was scheduled to take place before the end of 1940. The parties had been preparing for this election, and by autumn 1939, the following candidates had been selected:

Hartlepool by-election, 1943 [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Thomas Greenwell 13,333 64.1 +16.3
Common Wealth Elaine Burton 3,63417.4New
Independent Labour Oswald Lupton2,35111.3New
Independent Progressive Reg Hipwell 1,5107.2New
Majority9,69946.7+36.0
Turnout 20,82839.5-43.5
Conservative hold Swing N/A

*Lupton stood as a 'People's' candidate

General election 1945: The Hartlepools [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour D. T. Jones 16,502 41.2 +4.2
Conservative Thomas Greenwell 16,22740.5-7.3
Liberal Russell Vick 6,90317.3+2.1
Independent Harry Lane3901.0New
Majority2750.7N/A
Turnout 40,02276.1-6.4
Labour gain from Conservative Swing

Elections in the 1950s

General election 1950: The Hartlepools
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour D. T. Jones 25,60950.61
Conservative Thomas Greenwell 20,37340.26
Liberal Francis John Long4,6239.14
Majority5,23610.35
Turnout 50,60587.15
Labour hold Swing
General election 1951: The Hartlepools
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour D. T. Jones 27,14752.63
Conservative Paul T Carter24,43747.37
Majority2,7105.26
Turnout 51,58486.56
Labour hold Swing
General election 1955: The Hartlepools
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour D. T. Jones 25,14551.63
Conservative Francis Henry Gerard Heron Goodhart23,56048.37
Majority1,5853.26
Turnout 48,70581.84
Labour hold Swing
General election 1959: The Hartlepools
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative John Kerans 25,463 50.2 +1.8
Labour D. T. Jones 25,28149.8-1.8
Majority1820.4-2.9
Turnout 50,74483.3+1.5
Conservative gain from Labour Swing

Elections in the 1960s

General election 1964: The Hartlepools
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Edward Leadbitter 25,883 52.9 +3.1
Conservative Geoffrey Dodsworth 23,01647.1-3.1
Majority2,8675.8N/A
Turnout 48,89981.9-1.4
Labour gain from Conservative Swing +3.1
General election 1966: The Hartlepools
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Edward Leadbitter 27,509 59.3 +6.4
Conservative H Ian Bransom18,85740.7-6.4
Majority8,65218.6+12.8
Turnout 46,36678.5-3.4
Labour hold Swing +6.4

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1970: The Hartlepools
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Edward Leadbitter 27,704 57.8 -1.5
Conservative Michael Marshall 20,18842.2+1.5
Majority7,51615.7-2.9
Turnout 47,89274.4-4.1
Labour hold Swing -1.5

See also

Notes and References

Notes

  1. Son of previous candidate with same name

References

  1. 1 2 "Representation of the People Act 1867" (PDF). Retrieved 23 May 2020.
  2. Craig, Fred W. S. (1972). Boundaries of parliamentary constituencies 1885-1972;. Chichester,: Political Reference Publications. p. 130. ISBN   0-900178-09-4. OCLC   539011.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  3. "HMSO Boundary Commission Report 1868, The Hartlepools".
  4. "Representation of the People Act 1918". p. 436.
  5. Craig, Fred W. S. (1972). Boundaries of parliamentary constituencies 1885-1972;. Chichester,: Political Reference Publications. p. 60. ISBN   0-900178-09-4. OCLC   539011.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  6. Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "H" (part 1)
  7. 1 2 3 4 Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885(e-book) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. ISBN   978-1-349-02349-3.{{cite book}}: |format= requires |url= (help)
  8. "Hartlepool Election" . Manchester Times . 31 July 1875. p. 2. Retrieved 31 December 2017 via British Newspaper Archive.
  9. "Hartlepool Election" . Sheffield Daily Telegraph. 31 July 1875. p. 11. Retrieved 31 December 2017 via British Newspaper Archive.
  10. "Mr. Ahmed Kenealy in Hartlepool County Court" . Sunderland Daily Echo and Shipping Gazette . 9 October 1875. p. 4. Retrieved 31 December 2017 via British Newspaper Archive.
  11. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Craig, FWS, ed. (1974). British Parliamentary Election Results: 1885-1918. London: Macmillan Press. ISBN   9781349022984.
  12. "Yesterday's Nominations" . London Evening Standard . 2 July 1886. p. 3. Retrieved 28 November 2017 via British Newspaper Archive.
  13. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Craig, F.W.S., ed. (1969). British parliamentary election results 1918-1949 . Glasgow: Political Reference Publications. ISBN   0-900178-01-9.
  14. Report of the Annual Conference of the Labour Party, 1939

Coordinates: 54°39′N1°16′W / 54.650°N 1.267°W / 54.650; -1.267

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