The Korea Times

Last updated

The Korea Times
The Korea Times logo.png
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatPrint, online
Owner(s) Hankook Ilbo, under Dongwha Enterprise
Founder(s) Helen Kim
FoundedNovember 1, 1950;71 years ago (1950-11-01)
Political alignmentCentre
LanguageEnglish
Website koreatimes.co.kr

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References

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