The Midnight Prince

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The Midnight Prince
The Midnight Prince.jpg
Directed by René Guissart
Written by
Produced by Charles Simond
Starring
Cinematography René Colas
Edited by André Versein
Music by
Production
company
Vedettes Françaises Associees
Release date
2 November 1934
Running time
100 minutes
CountryFrance
LanguageFrench

The Midnight Prince (French: Prince de minuit) is a 1934 French musical comedy film directed by René Guissart and starring Henri Garat, Edith Méra and Monique Rolland. [1]

Contents

The film's sets were designed by the art director Jacques Colombier.

Synopsis

A Paris music shop assistant is employed at night by a nightclub to pretend to be a famous foreign prince in order to drum up business. Things become complicated when he is confused with a real foreign royal.

Cast

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References

  1. The A to Z of French Cinema p.196

Bibliography