The Schimeck Family (1935 film)

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The Schimeck Family
The Schimeck Family (1935 film).jpg
Directed by E.W. Emo
Written byReinhold Meißner
Max Wallner
Based onThe Schimek Family by Gustaf Kadelburg
Produced byHelmut Eweler
Franz Tappers
Starring Hans Moser
Käthe Haack
Hilde Schneider
Cinematography Willy Winterstein
Edited byMunni Obal
Music by Fritz Wenneis
Production
company
Majestic Film
Distributed by Tobis Film
Release date
  • 29 November 1935 (1935-11-29)
Running time
85 minutes
CountryGermany
Language German

The Schimeck Family (German: Familie Schimek) is a 1935 German comedy film directed by E.W. Emo and starring Hans Moser, Käthe Haack and Hilde Schneider. [1] It was shot at Johannisthal Studios in Berlin. [2] The film's sets were designed by the art directors Karl Böhm and Heinrich Richter. It is based on the play The Schimek Family by Gustaf Kadelburg, previously adapted into a 1926 silent film and later into a 1957 Austrian film.

Contents

Synopsis

In Berlin in 1908, after the death of their father three children go to live with their aunt and uncle.

Cast

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References

  1. Bock & Bergfelder p.518
  2. Klaus p.60

Bibliography