Theodor Schwenk

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Theodor Schwenk (8 October 1910, Schwäbisch Gmünd – 29 September 1986, Filderstadt) was an anthroposophist, an engineer and a pioneering water researcher who founded the Institute for Flow. He is most well known for his book Sensitive Chaos which explores subtle patterns and phenomenon of water, air and their relationship to biological forms. The narrative of the book is in the tradition of Goethe and Rudolf Steiner, viewing nature as ruled by a single unifying principle which is apparent in all movement and form.

Schwäbisch Gmünd Place in Baden-Württemberg, Germany

Schwäbisch Gmünd is a town in the eastern part of the German state of Baden-Württemberg. With a population of around 60,000, the town is the second largest in the Ostalb district and the whole East Württemberg region after Aalen. The town is a Große Kreisstadt since 1956, i.e. a chief town under district administration; it was the administrative capital of its own rural district until the local government reorganisation on 1 January 1973.

Filderstadt Place in Baden-Württemberg, Germany

Filderstadt is a town in the district of Esslingen in Baden-Württemberg in southern Germany. It is located approximately 13 km south of Stuttgart.

Anthroposophy philosophy founded by Rudolf Steiner

Anthroposophy is a philosophy founded by the 19th century esotericist Rudolf Steiner that postulates the existence of an objective, intellectually comprehensible spiritual world, accessible to human experience. Followers of anthroposophy aim to develop mental faculties of spiritual discovery through a mode of thought independent of sensory experience. They also aim to present their ideas in a manner verifiable by rational discourse and specifically seek a precision and clarity in studying the spiritual world mirroring that obtained by natural historians in investigations of the physical world.


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Disaccharide complex sugars, the sugar formed when two monosaccharides (simple sugars) are joined by glycosidic linkage; soluble in water; one of the four chemical groupings of carbohydrates

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An emulsion is a mixture of two or more liquids that are normally immiscible. Emulsions are part of a more general class of two-phase systems of matter called colloids. Although the terms colloid and emulsion are sometimes used interchangeably, emulsion should be used when both phases, dispersed and continuous, are liquids. In an emulsion, one liquid is dispersed in the other. Examples of emulsions include vinaigrettes, homogenized milk, and some cutting fluids for metal working.

Nature The phenomena of the physical world, and life in general

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Solution A homogeneous mixture which assumes the phase of the solvent

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Spaghetti type of pasta

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In thermodynamics, the triple point of a substance is the temperature and pressure at which the three phases of that substance coexist in thermodynamic equilibrium. It is that temperature and pressure at which the sublimation curve, fusion curve and the vaporisation curve meet. For example, the triple point of mercury occurs at a temperature of −38.83440 °C and a pressure of 0.2 mPa.

Tigris river which flows from Turkey through Iraq and Syria

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Gill respiratory organ

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Kaveri river in South India

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