Thinking Rabbit

Last updated
Thinking Rabbit
Public (defunct)
Industry Interactive entertainment
Founded1982
Headquarters Japan
Key people
Hiroyuki Imabayashi, president
Products See complete products listing.

Thinking Rabbit(有限会社シンキングラビット, Yūgen gaisha Shinkingurabitto) was a software house based in Takarazuka, Japan, best known for being the original publishers of Sokoban . The company joined the Disk Original Group in 1986.

A yūgen gaisha or yūgen kaisha is a form of business organization in Japan.

Japan Country in East Asia

Japan is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south.

Sokoban video game

Sokoban is a type of puzzle video game, in which the player pushes crates or boxes around in a warehouse, trying to get them to storage locations.

Games

<i>Casablanca</i> (film) 1942 film by Michael Curtiz

Casablanca is a 1942 American romantic drama film directed by Michael Curtiz based on Murray Burnett and Joan Alison's unproduced stage play Everybody Comes to Rick's. The film stars Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, and Paul Henreid; it also features Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, and Dooley Wilson. Set during contemporary World War II, it focuses on an American expatriate who must choose between his love for a woman and helping her and her husband, a Czech Resistance leader, escape from the Vichy-controlled city of Casablanca to continue his fight against the Nazis.

<i>8 Eyes</i> 1988 video game

8 Eyes is a 2D action platform game developed by Thinking Rabbit for the Nintendo Entertainment System. The game features eight levels, and can be played by one or two players. It also features a large, diverse soundtrack, composed by Kenzou Kumei, often quoting from the operatic repertoire, consisting of three pieces for each of the eight levels, each set in a different part of the world.

<i>Super Hydlide</i> 1989 video game

Super Hydlide is an action role-playing game for the Sega Genesis/Mega Drive. It was originally released in 1987 in Japan only under the title Hydlide 3: The Space Memories for the MSX, MSX2, and NEC PC-88. Ports were also released for the Nintendo Famicom and the Sharp X68000. The game was developed by Hydlide series veterans T&E Soft and released worldwide on the Sega Genesis / Mega Drive on October 6, 1989, in Japan, early 1990 in the United States, and 1991 in Europe. This remake evidences substantial graphical upgrades to the original Hydlide 3, though the gameplay remains largely identical. Before its release, it was called Hollo Fighter in some Sega advertising material and was one of the first third party published titles to be released in the U.S, the other being Air Diver.


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A sound chip is an integrated circuit designed to produce sound. It might do this through digital, analog or mixed-mode electronics. Sound chips normally contain things like oscillators, envelope controllers, samplers, filters and amplifiers. During the late 20th century, sound chips were widely used in arcade game system boards, video game consoles, home computers, and PC sound cards.

<i>Eroge</i> type of Japanese video game featuring erotica

An eroge is a Japanese erotic video game.

X68000 Japanese home computer created by Sharp Corporation

The X68000 is a home computer created by Sharp Corporation, first released in 1987, sold only in Japan.

FM Towns Japanese personal computer

FM Towns system is a Japanese variant of PC, built by Fujitsu from February 1989 to the summer of 1997. It started as a proprietary PC variant intended for multimedia applications and PC games, but later became more compatible with regular PCs. In 1993, the FM Towns Marty was released, a game console compatible with existing FM Towns games.

PC-8800 series series of home computer

The PC-8800 series, commonly shortened to PC-88, are a brand of Zilog Z80-based 8-bit home computers released by Nippon Electric Company (NEC) in 1981 and primarily sold in Japan.

PC-9800 series Series of Japanese personal computers

The PC-9800 series, commonly shortened to PC-98 or 98, is a lineup of Japanese 16-bit and 32-bit personal computers manufactured by NEC from 1982 through 2000. The platform established NEC's dominance in the Japanese personal computer market, and by 1999, more than 18 million PC-98 units had been sold.

<i>Bomberman</i> (1983 video game) 1983 video game

Bomberman is an arcade-style maze-based video game developed by Hudson Soft. The original home computer game Bomber Man was released in July 1983 for the NEC PC-8801, NEC PC-6001 mkII, Fujitsu FM-7, Sharp MZ-700, Sharp MZ-2000, Sharp X1 and MSX in Japan, and a censored version for the MSX and ZX Spectrum in Europe as Eric and the Floaters. It had a Japanese sequel known as 3-D Bomberman, in which Bomberman navigates the maze in the first-person. In 1985, Bomberman was released for the Nintendo Entertainment System. It spawned the Bomberman series with many installments building on its basic gameplay.

Bokosuka Wars (ボコスカウォーズ) is a 1983 action-strategy role-playing video game developed by Kōji Sumii (住井浩司) and released by ASCII for the Sharp X1 computer, followed by ports to the MSX, FM-7, NEC PC-6001, NEC PC-8801 and NEC PC-9801 computer platforms, as well as an altered version released for the Family Computer console and later the Virtual Console service. It revolves around a leader who must lead an army in phalanx formation across a battlefield in real-time against overwhelming enemy forces while freeing and recruiting soldiers along the way, with each unit able to gain experience and level up through battle. The player must make sure that the leader stays alive, until the army reaches the enemy castle to defeat the leader of the opposing forces.

<i>Princess Tomato in the Salad Kingdom</i> 1988 video game

Princess Tomato in the Salad Kingdom is a video game by Hudson Soft originally released in 1984 for the NEC PC-8801, NEC PC-6001, FM-7 and MSX Japanese home computers.

System Sacom (システムサコム), also known as System Sacom Sales Corp., is a Japanese company which sells electronic devices. They are more notable for their past, in which they developed video games. In the 1980s, they mainly published games for computers, but they changed focus to home consoles in the 1990s. Its head office is located in Tokyo.

<i>Laplace no Ma</i> 1993 video game

Laplace no Ma is a Japanese video game released in 1987 for the NEC PC-8801 and NEC PC-9801. The game was also ported to Sharp X68000, MSX, the SNES and TurboGrafx-CD.

<i>Xak: The Art of Visual Stage</i> 1992 video game

Xak: The Art of Visual Stage (サーク) is the first game in the fantasy role-playing video game series Xak developed and published by Micro Cabin. It was originally released for the NEC PC-8801 computer system, with subsequent versions being developed for the NEC PC-9801, Sharp X68000, MSX2, PC-Engine, Super Famicom, and mobile phones. The first four versions were re-released for Windows on online store Project EGG. An English translation of Xak: The Art of Visual Stage was also released in 2007 on the now-defunct retro gaming service WOOMB.net, and is now to become available on Project EGG.

<i>Hydlide</i> 1986 video game

Hydlide is a 1984 open world action role-playing video game developed and published by T&E Soft. It was originally released for the NEC PC-6001 and PC-8801 computers in 1984, in Japan only; ports for the MSX, MSX2, FM-7 and NEC PC-9801 were released the following year. A Nintendo Famicom version was first released under the name Hydlide Special on March 18, 1986 in Japan; three years later, in June 1989, that version saw a North American release for the Nintendo Entertainment System by FCI, its title having been returned to simply Hydlide. The game sold 2 million copies in Japan, across all platforms.

<i>Door Door</i> 1983 video game

Door Door is a puzzle-platform video game designed by Koichi Nakamura and published by Enix. As Enix's debut title, Door Door first released in February 1983 for the NEC PC-8801 and was subsequently converted for other Japanese computers. The game's success prompted a Famicom port and an expanded edition in 1985 as well as a mobile phone release in 2004. In 2006, editors of the popular Japanese gaming magazine Famitsu placed the game among classics such as Super Mario Bros. and Donkey Kong in its listing of the best Famicom games. Despite its popularity, Door Door has never been released outside Japan.

<i>Flappy</i> 2007 video game

Flappy is a puzzle game by dB-Soft in the same vein as the Eggerland series and Sokoban that is obscure outside Japan. It features Flappy, a somewhat mole-like character who must complete each level by pushing a blue stone from its starting place to the blue tile destination.

<i>Dragon Slayer: The Legend of Heroes</i> 1989 video game

Dragon Slayer: The Legend of Heroes is a role-playing game developed by Nihon Falcom. It is the sixth game in the Dragon Slayer line of games, and the first in The Legend of Heroes series.

Alpha (アルファ) is an interactive fiction and eroge game developed and published by Square, released for the NEC PC-8801, NEC PC-9801, Fujitsu FM-7, and Sharp X1 systems in 1986. Alpha uses a text parser to interpret the player's instructions and displays the results on screen.

<i>Dracula Hakushaku</i> 1992 video game

Dracula Hakushaku (ドラキュラ伯爵) is a 1992 Japan-exclusive text adventure video game released for the NEC PC-9801, Sharp X68000 and FM Towns.

<i>Dragon Knight</i> (video game) 1989 video game

Dragon Knight (ドラゴンナイト) is a fantasy-themed eroge role-playing video game and the original entry in the Dragon Knight franchise that was originally developed and published by ELF Corporation in 1989. Its remake was created by NEC Avenue in 1995. Both versions were released only in Japan. The game was adapted into an anime film in 1991 and was followed by Dragon Knight II in 1990.

S-OS is a simple operating system mainly for Z80 based computers. The operating system was first presented in 1986 in the Japanese magazine Oh!X in an article called "The Sentinel".