Third Abe Cabinet

Last updated
Third Abe Cabinet
Flag of Japan.svg
97th Cabinet of Japan
Abe Government 20141224 1.jpg
Prime Minister Shinzō Abe (front row, centre) with the re-elected cabinet inside the Kantei, December 24, 2014
Date formedDecember 24, 2014
Date dissolvedNovember 1, 2017
People and organisations
Head of stateEmperor Akihito
Head of government Shinzō Abe
Deputy head of government Tarō Asō
Member party Liberal DemocraticKomeito Coalition
Status in legislatureHoR: LDP-K Coalition supermajority
HoC: LDP-K Coalition majority
Opposition party Democratic Party of Japan (2014-2016)→
Democratic Party (2016-2017)→
Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan (2017)
Opposition leader Katsuya Okada (2014-2016)
Renhō (2016-2017)
Seiji Maehara (2017)
History
Election(s) 2014 general election
2016 councillors election
Predecessor Second Abe Cabinet
Successor Fourth Abe Cabinet

The Third Abe Cabinet governed Japan under the leadership of Prime Minister Shinzō Abe from December 2014 to November 2017. The government is a coalition between the Liberal Democratic Party and the Komeito (which had changed its name from "New Komeito" in the 2012–2014 term) and controls both the upper and lower houses of the National Diet.

Contents

Following the 2017 general election, the Third Abe cabinet was dissolved on November 1, 2017, and replaced with the Fourth Abe cabinet.

Background

Following the snap "Abenomics Dissolution" and general election of 2014, Abe was re-elected by the Diet and chose to retain all the ministers from his previous cabinet bar Defense Minister Akinori Eto, who had been involved in a money scandal. Abe explained that he aimed to avoid the disruption of another major personnel change only three months after the September cabinet reshuffle. [1] [2]

Abe has conducted three reshuffles of his third administration, the first took place in October 2015 following his re-election to another three-year term as President of the LDP and the launch of his "Abenomics 2.0" policies. [3] [4] The second reshuffle occurred in August 2016, following the victory of the ruling coalition in the July 2016 upper house elections, the first time since 1989 that the LDP has held an outright majority in the House of Councillors. [5] [6] The third reshuffle occurred in August 2017.

Election of the Prime Minister

24 December 2014
House of Representatives
Absolute majority (236/470) required
ChoiceVote
CaucusesVotes
Yes check.svg Shinzō Abe LDP (290), Independent [Speaker] (1), NKP (35), Others (2)
328 / 470
Katsuya Okada DPJ (72), Independent [Vice-Speaker] (1)
73 / 470
Kenji Eda Japan Innovation Party (41)
41 / 470
Kazuo Shii JCP (18)
18 / 470
Takeo Hiranuma PfG (2), Independent (1)
3 / 470
Tadatomo Yoshida SDP (2)
2 / 470
Keiichirō Asao Independent (1)
1 / 470
Toshinobu Nakazato Independent (1)
1 / 470
Blank ballotsIndependents/Others (2)
2 / 470
Unattributable vote(1)
1 / 470
Source: 188th Diet Session (House of Representatives) (roll call only lists individual votes, not grouped by caucus)
24 December 2014
House of Councillors
Absolute majority (121/240) required
ChoiceVote
CaucusesVotes
Yes check.svg Shinzō Abe LDP (113), NKP (20), AEJ (2)
135 / 240
Katsuya Okada DPJ-SR (58), PLP (2), Independent [Vice-President] (1)
61 / 240
Kenji Eda JIP (11)
11 / 240
Kazuo Shii JCP (11)
11 / 240
Takeo Hiranuma PFG (6)
6 / 240
Tadatomo Yoshida SDP (3), Independent [ OSMP (1)
4 / 240
Hiroyuki Arai NRP-Group of Independents (2)
2 / 240
Kōta Matsuda AEJ (2)
2 / 240
Tarō Yamada AEJ (1)
1 / 240
Tarō Yamamoto Independent (1)
1 / 240
Blank ballotsPFG (1), AEJ (1), Independent Club (4)
6 / 240
Source: 188th Diet Session (House of Councillors) (lists individual votes grouped by caucus)

Lists of Ministers

   Liberal Democratic
   Komeito
R = Member of the House of Representatives
C = Member of the House of Councillors

Cabinet

Third Abe Cabinet from December 24, 2014 to October 7, 2015
PortfolioMinisterTerm
Prime Minister Shinzō Abe RDecember 26, 2012 – September 16, 2020
Deputy Prime Minister
Minister of Finance
Minister of State for Financial Services
Minister in charge of Overcoming Deflation
Tarō Asō RDecember 26, 2012 – October 4, 2021
Minister for Internal Affairs and Communications Sanae Takaichi RSeptember 3, 2014 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Justice Yōko Kamikawa ROctober 20, 2014 – October 7, 2015
Minister of Foreign Affairs Fumio Kishida RDecember 26, 2012 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology
Minister in charge of Education Rebuilding
Hakubun Shimomura RDecember 26, 2012 – October 7, 2015
Minister of Health, Labour, and Welfare Yasuhisa Shiozaki RSeptember 3, 2014 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Koya Nishikawa RSeptember 3, 2014 – February 23, 2015
Yoshimasa Hayashi CFebruary 23, 2015 – October 7, 2015
Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry
Minister in charge of Industrial Competitiveness
Minister in charge of the Response to the Economic Impact caused by the
Nuclear Accident
Minister of State for the Nuclear Damage Compensation and Decommissioning
Facilitation Corporation
Yoichi Miyazawa COctober 20, 2014 – October 7, 2015
Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism
Minister in charge of Water Cycle Policy
Akihiro Ota RDecember 26, 2012 – October 7, 2015
Minister of the Environment
Minister of State for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness
Yoshio Mochizuki RSeptember 3, 2014 – October 7, 2015
Minister of Defence
Minister in charge of Security Legislation
Gen Nakatani RDecember 24, 2014 – August 3, 2016
Chief Cabinet Secretary
Minister in charge of Alleviating the Burden of the Bases in Okinawa
Yoshihide Suga RDecember 26, 2012 – September 16, 2020
Minister of Reconstruction
Minister in charge of Comprehensive Policy Coordination for Revival from the Nuclear
Accident at Fukushima
Wataru Takeshita RSeptember 3, 2014 – October 7, 2015
Chairperson of the National Public Safety Commission
Minister in charge of the Abduction Issue
Minister in charge of Ocean Policy and Territorial Issues
Minister in charge of Building National Resilience
Minister of State for Disaster Management
Eriko Yamatani CSeptember 3, 2014 – October 7, 2015
Minister of State for Okinawa and Northern Territories Affairs
Minister of State for Consumer Affairs and Food Safety
Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy
Minister of State for Space Policy
Minister in charge of Information Technology Policy
Minister in charge of "Challenge Again" Initiative
Minister in charge of "Cool Japan" Strategy
Shunichi Yamaguchi RSeptember 3, 2014 – October 7, 2015
Minister in charge of Support for Women's Empowerment
Minister in charge of Administrative Reform
Minister in charge of Civil Service Reform
Minister of State for Regulatory Reform
Minister of State for Measures for Declining Birthrate
Minister of State for Gender Equality
Haruko Arimura CSeptember 3, 2014 – October 7, 2015
Minister in charge of Economic Revitalization
Minister in charge of Total Reform of Social Security and Tax
Minister of State for Economic and Fiscal Policy
Akira Amari RDecember 26, 2012 – January 28, 2016
Minister in charge of Overcoming Population Decline and Vitalizing Local Economy in Japan
Minister of State for the National Strategic Special Zones
Shigeru Ishiba RSeptember 3, 2014 – August 3, 2016
Minister in charge of the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games Toshiaki Endo RJune 25, 2015 – August 3, 2016

Changes

  • February 23, 2015 – Agriculture Minister Koya Nishikawa resigned due to a campaign finance scandal. His immediate predecessor Yoshimasa Hayashi was recalled to replace him. [7]
  • June 25, 2015 – A new position of minister for the Olympics was created, Toshiaki Endo was appointed the inaugural minister. [8]

First Reshuffled Cabinet

PM Abe with his reshuffled cabinet inside the Kantei, October 7, 2015. Abe Government 20151007 2.jpg
PM Abe with his reshuffled cabinet inside the Kantei, October 7, 2015.
Third Abe Cabinet from October 7, 2015 to August 3, 2016
PortfolioMinisterTerm
Prime Minister Shinzō Abe RDecember 26, 2012 – September 16, 2020
Deputy Prime Minister
Minister of Finance
Minister of State for Financial Services
Minister in charge of Overcoming Deflation
Tarō Asō RDecember 26, 2012 – October 4, 2021
Minister for Internal Affairs and Communications Sanae Takaichi RSeptember 3, 2014 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Justice Mitsuhide Iwaki COctober 7, 2015 – August 3, 2016
Minister of Foreign Affairs Fumio Kishida RDecember 26, 2012 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology
Minister in charge of Education Rebuilding
Hiroshi Hase ROctober 7, 2015 – August 3, 2016
Minister of Health, Labour, and Welfare Yasuhisa Shiozaki RSeptember 3, 2014 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Hiroshi Moriyama ROctober 7, 2015 – August 3, 2016
Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry
Minister in charge of Industrial Competitiveness
Minister in charge of the Response to the Economic Impact caused by the
Nuclear Accident
Minister of State for the Nuclear Damage Compensation and Decommissioning
Facilitation Corporation
Motoo Hayashi ROctober 7, 2015 – August 3, 2016
Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism
Minister in charge of Water Cycle Policy
Keiichi Ishii ROctober 7, 2015 – September 11, 2019
Minister of the Environment
Minister of State for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness
Tamayo Marukawa COctober 7, 2015 – August 3, 2016
Minister of Defence Gen Nakatani RDecember 24, 2014 – August 3, 2016
Chief Cabinet Secretary
Minister in charge of Alleviating the Burden of the Bases in Okinawa
Yoshihide Suga RDecember 26, 2012 – September 16, 2020
Minister of Reconstruction
Minister in charge of Comprehensive Policy Coordination for Revival from the Nuclear
Accident at Fukushima
Tsuyoshi Takagi ROctober 7, 2015 – August 3, 2016
Chairman of the National Public Safety Commission
Minister in charge of Administrative Reform
Minister in charge of Civil Service Reform
Minister of State for Consumer Affairs and Food Safety
Minister of State for Regulatory Reform
Minister of State for Disaster Management
Taro Kono ROctober 7, 2015 – August 3, 2016
Minister of State for Okinawa and Northern Territories Affairs
Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy
Minister of State for Space Policy
Minister in charge of Ocean Policy and Territorial Issues
Minister in charge of Information Technology Policy
Minister in charge of "Cool Japan" Strategy
Aiko Shimajiri COctober 7, 2015 – August 3, 2016
Minister in charge of Economic Revitalization
Minister in charge of Total Reform of Social Security and Tax
Minister of State for Economic and Fiscal Policy
Akira Amari RDecember 26, 2012 – January 28, 2016
Nobuteru Ishihara RJanuary 28, 2016 – August 3, 2017
Minister for Promoting Dynamic Engagement of All Citizens
Minister in charge of Women's Empowerment
Minister in charge of "Challenge Again" Initiative
Minister in charge of the Abduction Issue
Minister in charge of Building National Resilience
Minister of State for Measures for Declining Birthrate
Minister of State for Gender Equality
Katsunobu Katō ROctober 7, 2015 – August 3, 2017
Minister in charge of Overcoming Population Decline and Vitalizing Local Economy in Japan
Minister of State for the National Strategic Special Zones
Shigeru Ishiba RSeptember 3, 2014 – August 3, 2016
Minister in charge of the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games Toshiaki Endo RJune 25, 2015 – August 3, 2016

Changes

Second Reshuffled Cabinet

PM Abe with his reshuffled cabinet inside the Kantei, August 3, 2016. Abe Government 20160803 1.jpg
PM Abe with his reshuffled cabinet inside the Kantei, August 3, 2016.
Third Abe Cabinet from August 3, 2016 to August 3, 2017
PortfolioMinisterTerm
Prime Minister Shinzō Abe RDecember 26, 2012 – September 16, 2021
Deputy Prime Minister
Minister of Finance
Minister of State for Financial Services
Minister in charge of Overcoming Deflation
Tarō Asō RDecember 26, 2012 – October 4, 2021
Minister for Internal Affairs and Communications
Minister of State for the Social Security and Tax Number System
Sanae Takaichi RSeptember 3, 2014 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Justice Katsutoshi Kaneda RAugust 3, 2016 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Foreign Affairs Fumio Kishida RDecember 26, 2012 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology
Minister in charge of Education Rebuilding
Hirokazu Matsuno RAugust 3, 2016 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Health, Labour, and Welfare Yasuhisa Shiozaki RSeptember 3, 2014 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Yuji Yamamoto RAugust 3, 2016 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry
Minister in charge of Industrial Competitiveness
Minister for Economic Cooperation with Russia
Minister in charge of the Response to the Economic Impact caused by the
Nuclear Accident
Minister of State for the Nuclear Damage Compensation and Decommissioning
Facilitation Corporation
Hiroshige Sekō CAugust 3, 2016 – September 11, 2019
Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism
Minister in charge of Water Cycle Policy
Keiichi Ishii ROctober 7, 2015 – September 11, 2019
Minister of the Environment
Minister of State for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness
Koichi Yamamoto RAugust 3, 2016 – August 3, 2017
Minister of Defence Tomomi Inada RAugust 3, 2016 – July 28, 2017
Chief Cabinet Secretary
Minister in charge of Alleviating the Burden of the Bases in Okinawa
Yoshihide Suga RDecember 26, 2012 – September 16, 2020
Minister of Reconstruction
Minister in charge of Comprehensive Policy Coordination for Revival from the Nuclear
Accident at Fukushima
Masahiro Imamura RAugust 3, 2016 – April 26, 2017
Masayoshi Yoshino RApril 26, 2017 – October 2, 2018
Chairman of the National Public Safety Commission
Minister in charge of Ocean Policy and Territorial Issues
Minister in charge of Building National Resilience
Minister of State for Consumer Affairs and Food Safety
Minister of State for Disaster Management
Jun Matsumoto RAugust 3, 2016 – August 3, 2017
Minister of State for Okinawa and Northern Territories Affairs
Minister of State for "Cool Japan" Strategy
Minister of State for the Intellectual Property Strategy
Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy
Minister of State for Space Policy
Minister in charge of Information Technology Policy
Yōsuke Tsuruho CAugust 3, 2016 – August 3, 2017
Minister in charge of Economic Revitalization
Minister in charge of Total Reform of Social Security and Tax
Minister of State for Economic and Fiscal Policy
Nobuteru Ishihara RJanuary 28, 2016 – August 3, 2017
Minister for Promoting Dynamic Engagement of All Citizens
Minister for Working-style Reform
Minister in charge of Women's Empowerment
Minister in charge of "Challenge Again" Initiative
Minister in charge of the Abduction Issue
Minister of State for Measures for Declining Birthrate
Minister of State for Gender Equality
Katsunobu Katō ROctober 7, 2015 – August 3, 2017
Minister in charge of Overcoming Population Decline and Vitalizing Local Economy in Japan
Minister of State for Regulatory Reform
Minister in charge of Overcoming Population Decline and Vitalizing Local Economy in Japan
Minister in charge of Administrative Reform
Minister in charge of Civil Service Reform
Kozo Yamamoto RAugust 3, 2016 – August 3, 2017
Minister in charge of the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games Tamayo Marukawa CAugust 3, 2016 – August 3, 2017

Changes

Third Reshuffled Cabinet

PM Abe with his reshuffled cabinet inside the Kantei, August 3, 2017. Abe Government 20170803.jpg
PM Abe with his reshuffled cabinet inside the Kantei, August 3, 2017.
Third Abe Cabinet from August 3, 2017 to November 1, 2017
PortfolioMinisterTerm
Prime Minister Shinzō Abe RDecember 26, 2012 – September 16, 2020
Deputy Prime Minister
Minister of Finance
Minister of State for Financial Services
Minister in charge of Overcoming Deflation
Tarō Asō RDecember 26, 2012 – October 4, 2021
Minister for Internal Affairs and Communications
Minister in charge of Women's Empowerment
Minister of State for the Social Security and Tax Number System
Seiko Noda RAugust 3, 2017 – October 2, 2018
Minister of Justice Yōko Kamikawa RAugust 3, 2017 – October 2, 2018
Minister of Foreign Affairs Taro Kono RAugust 3, 2017 – September 11, 2019
Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology
Minister in charge of Education Rebuilding
Yoshimasa Hayashi RAugust 3, 2017 – October 2, 2018
Minister of Health, Labour, and Welfare
Minister for Working-style Reform
Minister in charge of the Abduction Issue
Minister of State for the Abduction Issue
Katsunobu Katō RAugust 3, 2017 – October 2, 2018
Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Ken Saitō RAugust 3, 2017 – October 2, 2018
Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry
Minister in charge of Industrial Competitiveness
Minister for Economic Cooperation with Russia
Minister in charge of the Response to the Economic Impact caused by the
Nuclear Accident
Minister of State for the Nuclear Damage Compensation and Decommissioning
Facilitation Corporation
Hiroshige Sekō CAugust 3, 2016 – September 11, 2019
Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism
Minister in charge of Water Cycle Policy
Keiichi Ishii ROctober 7, 2015 – September 11, 2019
Minister of the Environment
Minister of State for Nuclear Emergency Preparedness
Masaharu Nakagawa CAugust 3, 2017 – October 2, 2018
Minister of Defence Itsunori Onodera RAugust 3, 2017 – October 2, 2018
Chief Cabinet Secretary
Minister in charge of Alleviating the Burden of the Bases in Okinawa
Yoshihide Suga RDecember 26, 2012 – September 16, 2020
Minister of Reconstruction
Minister in charge of Comprehensive Policy Coordination for Revival from the Nuclear
Accident at Fukushima
Masayoshi Yoshino RApril 26, 2017 – October 2, 2018
Chairperson of the National Public Safety Commission
Minister in charge of Building National Resilience
Minister of State for Disaster Management
Hachiro Okonogi RAugust 3, 2017 – October 2, 2018
Minister of State for Okinawa and Northern Territories Affairs
Minister of State for Consumer Affairs and Food Safety
Minister of State for Ocean Policy
Minister in charge of Territorial Issues
Tetsuma Esaki RAugust 3, 2017 – February 27, 2018
Minister in charge of Economic Revitalization
Minister in charge of Total Reform of Social Security and Tax
Minister of State for Economic and Fiscal Policy
Toshimitsu Motegi RAugust 3, 2017 – September 11, 2019
Minister for Promoting Dynamic Engagement of All Citizens
Minister in charge of Information Technology Policy
Minister of State for Measures for Declining Birthrate
Minister of State for Gender Equality
Minister of State for "Cool Japan" Strategy
Minister of State for the Intellectual Property Strategy
Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy
Minister of State for Space Policy
Masaji Matsuyama CAugust 3, 2017 – October 2, 2018
Minister of State for Regional Revitalization
Minister of State for Regulatory Reform
Minister in charge of Regional Revitalization
Minister in charge of Administrative Reform
Minister in charge of Civil Service Reform
Hiroshi Kajiyama RAugust 3, 2017 – October 2, 2018
Minister in charge of the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games Shunichi Suzuki RAugust 3, 2017 – October 2, 2018

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