Thomas–Wiley–Johnson Farmstead

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Thomas–Wiley–Johnson Farmstead
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Location 703 Johnsonville Rd., near Johnsonville, New York
Coordinates 42°52′19″N73°29′52″W / 42.87204°N 73.49779°W / 42.87204; -73.49779 Coordinates: 42°52′19″N73°29′52″W / 42.87204°N 73.49779°W / 42.87204; -73.49779
Area 171.02 acres (69.21 ha)
Built c. 1790 (1790)-1800
Architectural style Greek Revival
MPS Farmsteads of Pittstown, New York MPS
NRHP reference # 12000798 [1]
Added to NRHP September 19, 2012

Thomas–Wiley–Johnson Farmstead is a historic home and farm located near Johnsonville, Rensselaer County, New York. The farmhouse was built between about 1790 and 1800, and consists of a two-story, five bay, Greek Revival style frame main block with a kitchen wing added about 1840. It was remodeled about 1870, and has another wing added about the same time. Also on the property are the contributing main barn group with cow barn and milk house additions (c. 1860-1960), hen house and corn crib (c. 1930, c. 1950), work shop (c. 1880-1900), and garage (c. 1950). [2] :3–5

Johnsonville, New York hamlet in New York, United States

Johnsonville is a hamlet located in the towns of Pittstown and Schaghticoke, New York. It was named for its settler, William Johnson.

Rensselaer County, New York County in the United States

Rensselaer County is a county in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 159,429. Its county seat is Troy. The county is named in honor of the family of Kiliaen van Rensselaer, the original Dutch owner of the land in the area.

Greek Revival architecture architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries

The Greek Revival was an architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in Northern Europe and the United States. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2012. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 9/17/12 through 9/21/12. National Park Service. 2012-09-28.
  2. "Cultural Resource Information System (CRIS)" (Searchable database). New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation . Retrieved 2015-12-01.Note: This includes Jessie A. Ravage (April 2012). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Thomas–Wiley–Johnson Farmstead" (PDF). Retrieved 2015-12-01. and Accompanying photographs