Thomas Aloysius Boland

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The Most Reverend
Thomas Aloysius Boland
Archbishop emeritus of Newark
See Newark
Installed January 14, 1953
Term ended April 2, 1974
Predecessor Thomas Walsh
Successor Peter Leo Gerety
Other posts Auxiliary Bishop of Newark (1940-47)
Bishop of Paterson (1947-52)
Orders
Ordination December 23, 1922
Consecration July 25, 1940
Personal details
Born(1896-02-17)February 17, 1896
Orange, New Jersey
Died March 16, 1979(1979-03-16) (aged 83)
Orange, New Jersey
Denomination Roman Catholic Church
Styles of
Thomas Aloysius Boland
Mitre (plain).svg
Reference style The Most Reverend
Spoken style Your Excellency
Religious style Monsignor
Posthumous style none
Ordination history of
Thomas Aloysius Boland
History
Episcopal consecration
Consecrated by Thomas Walsh (Newark)
Date of consecration July 25, 1940
Episcopal succession
Bishops consecrated by Thomas Aloysius Boland as principal consecrator
Justin J. McCarthy June 11, 1954
Walter William Curtis September 24, 1957
Martin Walter Stanton September 24, 1957
Joseph Arthur Costello January 24, 1963
John Joseph Dougherty January 24, 1963
John Edward Cohill, S.V.D. March 11, 1967

Thomas Aloysius Boland (February 17, 1896March 16, 1979) was an American prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. He was Archbishop of Newark from 1952 to 1974, having previously served as Auxiliary Bishop of Newark (1940–47) and Bishop of Paterson (1947-52).

United States federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Prelate high-ranking member of the clergy

A prelate is a high-ranking member of the clergy who is an ordinary or who ranks in precedence with ordinaries. The word derives from the Latin prælatus, the past participle of præferre, which means "carry before", "be set above or over" or "prefer"; hence, a prelate is one set over others.

Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark archdiocese

The Archdiocese of Newark is an archdiocese of the Catholic Church in northeastern New Jersey, United States. Its ecclesiastic territory includes all of the Catholic parishes and schools in the New Jersey counties of Bergen, Union, Hudson and Essex.

Contents

Early life and education

Thomas Boland was born in Orange, New Jersey, to John Peter and Ellen Agnes (née O'Rourke) Boland. [1] He received his early education at the St. John's School the parish school of St. John the Evangelist Church [2] He then attended St. Francis Xavier High School in New York City. [3] He founded St. Joseph Regional High School, Immaculate Heart Academy and Paramus Catholic High School in the early/mid '60s.

Orange, New Jersey Township in New Jersey, United States

The City of Orange is a township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 30,134, reflecting a decline of 2,734 (-8.3%) from the 32,868 counted in 2000, which had in turn increased by 2,943 (+9.8%) from the 29,925 counted in the 1990 Census.

New Jersey State of the United States of America

New Jersey is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the Northeastern United States. It is a peninsula, bordered on the north and east by the state of New York, particularly along the extent of the length of New York City on its western edge; on the east, southeast, and south by the Atlantic Ocean; on the west by the Delaware River and Pennsylvania; and on the southwest by the Delaware Bay and Delaware. New Jersey is the fourth-smallest state by area but the 11th-most populous, with 9 million residents as of 2017, and the most densely populated of the 50 U.S. states; its biggest city is Newark. New Jersey lies completely within the combined statistical areas of New York City and Philadelphia and was the second-wealthiest U.S. state by median household income as of 2017.

Columbus Hall, Orange, New Jersey building in Orange, New Jersey

Columbus Hall, located in Orange, New Jersey, is a historic building which housed both a school and a theatre. Designed by Jeremiah O'Rourke of Newark, the building was named to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the landing of Christopher Columbus in the new world. The cornerstone was laid by Newark Bishop Winand Wigger on April 9, 1893, and construction was completed in December 1894.

In 1915, Boland enrolled at Seton Hall College in South Orange. [1] He graduated from Seton Hall in 1919 as valedictorian of his class. [4] He then began his studies for the priesthood at the Pontifical North American College in Rome. [4] He earned a Doctor of Sacred Theology degree from the Pontifical Urbaniana University. [2]

Seton Hall University university

Seton Hall University is a private Roman Catholic university in South Orange, New Jersey, United States. Founded in 1856 by then-Bishop James Roosevelt Bayley and named after his aunt, Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, Seton Hall is the oldest diocesan university in the United States.

South Orange, New Jersey Township in New Jersey, United States

South Orange, officially the Township of South Orange Village, is a suburban township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the village's population was 16,198, reflecting a decline of 766 (-4.5%) from the 16,964 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 574 (+3.5%) from the 16,390 counted in the 1990 Census. Seton Hall University is located in the township.

Valedictorian is an academic title of success used in the United States, Canada, Central America, Singapore, and the Philippines for the student who delivers the closing or farewell statement at a graduation ceremony. The chosen valedictorian is often the student with the highest ranking among their graduating class. The term is an Anglicised derivation of the Latin vale dicere, historically rooted in the valedictorian's traditional role as the final speaker at the graduation ceremony before the students receive their diplomas. The valedictory address generally is considered a final farewell to classmates, before they disperse to pursue their individual paths after graduating.

Priesthood

On December 23, 1922, Boland was ordained a priest of the Archdiocese of Newark at the Basilica of St. John Lateran. [5] Following his return to New Jersey, he was first assigned as a curate at St. Catherine's Church in Hillside. [3] He also served at St. Mary's Church in Nutley. [2] In addition to his pastoral duties, he taught Sacred Scripture and classical languages at Seton Hall Preparatory School and Seton Hall College. [1]

Curate person who is invested with the care or cure (cura) of souls of a parish

A curate is a person who is invested with the care or cure (cura) of souls of a parish. In this sense, "curate" correctly means a parish priest; but in English-speaking countries the term curate is commonly used to describe clergy who are assistants to the parish priest. The duties or office of a curate are called a curacy.

Hillside, New Jersey Township in New Jersey, United States

Hillside is a township in Union County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 21,404, reflecting a decline of 343 (-1.6%) from the 21,747 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 703 (+3.3%) from the 21,044 counted in the 1990 Census.

Nutley, New Jersey Township in New Jersey, United States

Nutley is a township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 28,370, reflecting an increase of 1,008 (+3.7%) from the 27,362 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 263 (+1.0%) from the 27,099 counted in the 1990 Census.

From 1926 to 1938, Boland served as professor of moral theology and canon law at Immaculate Conception Seminary in Darlington. [1] In 1933, he became an official of the archdiocesan tribunal with the duty of adjudicating marriages of questionable validity. [2] That same year, he was named moderator of priests' conferences. [2] He was chancellor of the archdiocese from 1938 to 1940. [1]

Ethics involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong behavior. A central aspect of ethics is "the good life", the life worth living or life that is simply satisfying, which is held by many philosophers to be more important than traditional moral conduct.

Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology

The Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology (ICSST) is the major seminary for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark and is part of Seton Hall University, a Roman Catholic university in New Jersey, and is located in South Orange, within the Archdiocese of Newark. ICSST is one of the oldest Catholic seminaries in the United States. Seton Hall is the oldest diocesan university in the country. ICSST admits both students to study as seminarians and lay persons as well. In addition to a Seminary Formation Program to prepare men for priesthood, ICSST has a renowned graduate program offering the following degrees:

Chancellor (ecclesiastical)

Chancellor is an ecclesiastical title used by several quite distinct officials of some Christian churches.

Episcopacy

On May 21, 1940, Boland was appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Newark and Titular Bishop of Hirina by Pope Pius XII. [5] He received his episcopal consecration on the following July 25 from Archbishop Thomas Walsh, with Bishops William A. Griffin and Bartholomew J. Eustace serving as co-consecrators. [5] As an auxiliary bishop, he served as rector of Immaculate Conception Seminary from 1940 to 1947. [1] In this capacity, he taught pastoral theology and liturgy and lectured on the archdiocesan statutes. [6] He also served as director of the Newark branch of the National Organization for Decent Literature, and as promoter of the archdiocesan synod held in 1941. [2]

Hirina (Hirena) was a city and bishopric in southern Tunisia, known only through ecclesiastical records, which became a Latin titular bishopric.

Pope Pius XII 260th Pope of the Catholic Church

Pope Pius XII, born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli, was head of the Catholic Church from 2 March 1939 to his death. Before his election to the papacy, he served as secretary of the Department of Extraordinary Ecclesiastical Affairs, papal nuncio to Germany, and Cardinal Secretary of State, in which capacity he worked to conclude treaties with European and Latin American nations, most notably the Reichskonkordat with Nazi Germany.

Consecration is the solemn dedication to a special purpose or service, usually religious. The word consecration literally means "association with the sacred". Persons, places, or things can be consecrated, and the term is used in various ways by different groups. The origin of the word comes from the Latin word consecrat, which means dedicated, devoted, and sacred. A synonym for to consecrate is to sanctify; a distinct antonym is to desecrate.

Following the death of Bishop Thomas H. McLaughlin, Boland was named the second Bishop of Paterson on June 21, 1947. [5] His installation took place at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist on September 18 of that year. [3] As bishop of Paterson, he served as the spiritual leader of 135,000 Catholics in North Jersey for five years. [3]

Boland was appointed the second Archbishop of Newark on November 15, 1952. [5] He was installed at Sacred Heart Church in Vailsburg on January 14, 1953. [7] On October 19, 1954, he formally dedicated the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Newark. [8] At the same ceremony, he received the pallium, a vestment worn by metropolitan bishops, from Archbishop Amleto Giovanni Cicognani, the Apostolic Delegate to the United States. [7]

Between 1962 and 1965, Boland attended all four sessions of the Second Vatican Council in Rome, where he was elected to head the Bishops' Study Committee. [4] In June 1965, he was named an Assistant at the Pontifical Throne by Pope Paul VI for "establishing numerous parishes, opening many parochial schools and admitting the laity to active participation in the apostolate of the sacred ecclesiastical hierarchy." [9] He was also a member of the Catholic Mission Board of the United States, chair of the Episcopal Committee, and liaison between women religious and the American Catholic bishops. [4]

In January 1969, a group of 20 priests of the Archdiocese of Newark accused Boland of adopting a "white racist attitude" toward African Americans and said he must be charged with "the bigotry of indolence and the prejudice of apathy." [10] Along with these accusations of racism, the group of priests presented a list of demands, which called for the formation of an advisory committee of priests for inner-city affairs, an improved method of screening priests in African American areas, and the transfer of some pastors who have "not proven a predisposition for justice by their performance." [10] In response, Boland issued a seven-page report that outlined the programs the archdiocese had taken in regard to African Americans. [11] He declared, "No one can truthfully say I have not made every effort to bring to reality those plans which I have felt could be of advantage, whether for spiritual or temporal goals, of the disadvantaged in our midst. [11]

Later life and death

He retired as Archbishop of Newark on April 2, 1974, after twenty-one years of service. [5] He died at St. Mary's Hospital in Orange, aged 83. [11] He was buried in the crypt of the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart. [4]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Curtis, Georgina Pell (1961). The American Catholic Who's Who. XIV. Grosse Pointe, Michigan: Walter Romig.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "PATERSON PRELATE NAMED ARCHBISHOP; Boland Designated Successor to Walsh of New York, Whom He Served as Auxiliary". The New York Times . 1952-11-19.
  3. 1 2 3 4 "BOLAND BECOMES PATERSON BISHOP; Installed as Spiritual Leader of 135,000 in North JerseyWalsh Conducts Services". The New York Times . 1947-09-19.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 "Most Reverend Thomas A. Boland, S.T.D., LL.D." Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark .
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Archbishop Thomas Aloysius Boland". Catholic-Hierarchy.org.[ self-published source ]
  6. "Modern Times at Darlington". Seton Hall University .
  7. 1 2 Sheldon, Preston King (1953-01-15). "BOLAND INSTALLED AS ARCHBISHOP; Apostolic Delegate Presides at Newark CeremonyPallium Yet to Be Conferred". The New York Times .
  8. Zerner, Charles (1954-10-20). "NEW CATHEDRAL IN NEWARK OPENS". The New York Times .
  9. "Archbishop Boland Marks Jubilee". The New York Times . 1965-06-24.
  10. 1 2 "Newark Prelate, Accused of Racism, Defends Programs". The New York Times . 1969-01-10.
  11. 1 2 3 Goodman, Jr., George (1979-03-18). "Archbishop Thomas Boland, 83, Of Newark Archdiocese Is Dead". The New York Times .
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Auxiliary Bishop of Newark
July 25, 1940 June 21, 1947
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Thomas Henry McLaughlin
Bishop of Paterson
June 21, 1947 November 15, 1952
Succeeded by
James Aloysius McNulty
Preceded by
Thomas Joseph Walsh
Archbishop of Newark
November 15, 1952 March 25, 1974
Succeeded by
Peter Leo Gerety