Thomas Barnard

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Thomas Barnard

S.T.B.
Bishop of Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe
William Daniell - Dr Thomas Barnard, Bishop of Limerick - B1975.6.2 - Yale Center for British Art.jpg
Church Church of Ireland
Installed22 May 1794
Term ended7 June 1806
Predecessor William Cecil Pery
Successor Charles Mongan Warburton
Orders
Consecration20 February 1780
by  Charles Agar
Personal details
Born1726 or 1728
Died7 June 1806
Wimbledon, Surrey, England
Denomination Church of England
Parents William Barnard
Occupationclergyman
Previous post(s) Bishop of Killaloe and Kilfenora
EducationLeeds grammar School and Westminster School
Alma mater Corpus Christi College, Oxford

Thomas Barnard (c.1726/28–1806) was an Anglican clergyman who served in the Church of Ireland as Bishop of Killaloe and Kilfenora (1780–1794) and Bishop of Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe (1794–1806).

Born in 1726 [1] or 1728, [2] he was the eldest son of Dr. William Barnard, Bishop of Raphoe (later of Derry). [1] He was educated at Westminster School, where he was admitted a King's Scholar in 1741, [1] but he almost certainly spent some time at Leeds Grammar School. Later he went to Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and was awarded with a Bachelor of Arts in 1756, Master of Arts in 1760 and Bachelor of Divinity in 1769. [1]

He was successively Vicar of Maghera (1751–1760), [3] Archdeacon of Derry (1760–1769), [4] and Dean of Derry (1769–1780). [5] He was nominated Bishop of Killaloe and Kilfenora by King George III on 29 January 1780 and consecrated bishop at the Chapel Royal in Dublin Castle on 20 February 1780. [1] [6] The principal consecrator was Charles Agar, Archbishop of Cashel, and the principal co-consecrators were William Newcome, Bishop of Waterford and Lismore and Isaac Mann, Bishop of Cork and Ross. [1] Fourteen years later, he was translated to the bishopric of Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe; [7] having been nominated to the see on 14 August 1794 and by letters patent on 12 September 1794. [3] [6]

He was a member of the Literary Club, and well known as the friend of Samuel Johnson, Oliver Goldsmith, Sir Joshua Reynolds, Edmund Burke, Bishop Thomas Percy, and other literary characters of his day. [2] He married Anne Browne of co. Carlow in 1758 and secondly Jane Ross-Lewin. [8]

He died in his 80th year, [9] at Wimbledon in Surrey, on 7 June 1806. [7] [9]

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Cotton 1851, The Province of Munster, p. 472.
  2. 1 2 Cooper 1885, Dictionary of National Biography, volume 3, p. 241.
  3. 1 2 Cotton 1851, The Province of Munster, p. 390.
  4. Cotton 1849, The Province of Ulster, p. 338.
  5. Cotton 1849, The Province of Ulster, p. 334.
  6. 1 2 Fryde et al. 1996, Handbook of British Chronology, p. 397.
  7. 1 2 Fryde et al. 1996, Handbook of British Chronology, p. 401.
  8. "William Barnard".
  9. 1 2 Cotton 1851, The Province of Munster, p. 391.

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References

Church of Ireland titles
Preceded by Dean of Derry
1769–1780
Succeeded by
Preceded by Bishop of Killaloe and Kilfenora
1780–1794
Succeeded by
Preceded by Bishop of Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe
1794–1806
Succeeded by