Thomas Brunce

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Thomas Brunce
Bishop of Norwich
Appointed19 September 1437
Term ended6 December 1445
Predecessor William Alnwick
Successor Walter Hart
Other posts Bishop of Rochester (1435–1437)
Bishop of Worcester-elect (1433)
Dean of Salisbury (1431–1435)
Bishop of Chichester-elect (1429)
Orders
Consecration1 May 1435
Personal details
Born c. 1388
Died6 December 1445
Hoxne, Suffolk
Denomination Roman Catholic
Parents William Brunce
Alma mater Oxford University (possibly New College)

Thomas Brunce [lower-alpha 1] (c. 1388 – 6 December 1445) was a 15th-century Bishop of Rochester and then Bishop of Norwich.

Circa – frequently abbreviated c., ca., or ca, and less frequently circ. or cca. – signifies "approximately" in several European languages and as a loanword in English, usually in reference to a date. Circa is widely used in historical writing when the dates of events are not accurately known.

Bishop of Rochester ecclastical office in the anglican church

The Bishop of Rochester is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Rochester in the Province of Canterbury.

Bishop of Norwich Diocesan bishop in the Church of England

The Bishop of Norwich is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Norwich in the Province of Canterbury. The diocese covers most of the county of Norfolk and part of Suffolk. The current Bishop of Norwich is Graham James, who signs as +Graham Norvic.

Contents

Life

Brunce was the son of William Brunce of Brunce's Court in Sutton Courtenay in Berkshire (now Oxfordshire). He studied at Oxford, possibly at New College, where he became friends with Thomas Beckington (later Bishop of Bath and Wells).

Sutton Courtenay village and civil parish in Vale of White Horse district, Oxfordshire, England

Sutton Courtenay is a village and civil parish on the River Thames 2 miles (3 km) south of Abingdon and 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Didcot. Historically part of Berkshire, it has been administered as part of Oxfordshire since the 1974 boundary changes. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 2,421.

Berkshire County of England

Berkshire is one of the home counties in England. It was recognised by the Queen as the Royal County of Berkshire in 1957 because of the presence of Windsor Castle, and letters patent were issued in 1974. Berkshire is a county of historic origin, a ceremonial county and a non-metropolitan county without a county council. The county town is Reading.

Oxfordshire County of England

Oxfordshire is a county in South East England. The ceremonial county borders Warwickshire to the north-west, Northamptonshire to the north-east, Buckinghamshire to the east, Berkshire to the south, Wiltshire to the south-west and Gloucestershire to the west.

Brunce entered the Church and held a number of posts in Lincolnshire, being collated Archdeacon of Stow in 1419.[ citation needed ] He also undertook diplomatic missions on the Continent for King Henry V. [1] In 1427 he was collated Archdeacon of Berkshire [ citation needed ] and in 1429 was elected Bishop of Chichester, although the latter position was given to Simon Sydenham instead. [2] He was Dean of Salisbury (since 1431) when, Pope Eugene IV wanted to make him Bishop of Worcester on 24 September 1433, [3] but King Henry VI of England had other ideas and he was made Bishop of Rochester instead on 21 February 1435. [4]

Lincolnshire County of England

Lincolnshire is a county in eastern England, with a long coastline on the North Sea to the east. It borders Norfolk to the south east, Cambridgeshire to the south, Rutland to the south west, Leicestershire and Nottinghamshire to the west, South Yorkshire to the north west, and the East Riding of Yorkshire to the north. It also borders Northamptonshire in the south for just 20 yards (18 m), England's shortest county boundary. The county town is the city of Lincoln, where the county council has its headquarters.

Europe Continent in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere

Europe is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the west and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia.

Brunce was consecrated on 1 May 1435. [4] On 19 September 1437, he was transferred to the see of Norwich, [5] where he is remembered for upholding the rights of the Cathedral over the townsfolk and for erecting the great rood loft. [1] He died on 6 December 1445 [5] at the Episcopal manor of Hoxne in Suffolk.

Cathedral Christian church, which is seat of a bishop

A cathedral is a Christian church which contains the cathedra of a bishop, thus serving as the central church of a diocese, conference, or episcopate. The equivalent word in German for such a church is Dom ; see also Duomo in Italian, Dom(kerk) in Dutch, and cognates in many other European languages. Churches with the function of "cathedral" are usually specific to those Christian denominations with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Catholic, Anglican, Orthodox, and some Lutheran and Methodist churches. Church buildings embodying the functions of a cathedral first appeared in Italy, Gaul, Spain and North Africa in the 4th century, but cathedrals did not become universal within the Western Catholic Church until the 12th century, by which time they had developed architectural forms, institutional structures and legal identities distinct from parish churches, monastic churches and episcopal residences.

Rood

A rood or rood cross, sometimes known as a triumphal cross, is a cross or crucifix, especially the large Crucifixion set above the entrance to the chancel of a medieval church. Alternatively, it is a large sculpture or painting of the crucifixion of Jesus.

Suffolk County of England

Suffolk is an East Anglian county of historic origin in England. It has borders with Norfolk to the north, Cambridgeshire to the west and Essex to the south. The North Sea lies to the east. The county town is Ipswich; other important towns include Lowestoft, Bury St Edmunds, Newmarket and Felixstowe, one of the largest container ports in Europe.

Notes

  1. Sometimes Brouns, or incorrectly Brown

Citations

  1. 1 2 Ford, David Nash. "Thomas Brunce". Royal Berkshire History. Retrieved 2008-11-15.
  2. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 239
  3. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 279
  4. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 268
  5. 1 2 Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 262

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References

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Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
John Rickingale
Bishop of Chichester
1429
Succeeded by
Simon Sydenham
Preceded by
Thomas Polton
Bishop of Worcester
1433–1435
Succeeded by
Thomas Bourchier
Preceded by
John Langdon
Bishop of Rochester
1435–1437
Succeeded by
William Wells
Preceded by
William Alnwick
Bishop of Norwich
1437–1445
Succeeded by
Walter Hart