Thomas Cheney (folklorist)

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ISBN 9780874801965
  • Lore of Faith and Folly (1971) (editor) OCLC   312425281
  • The Golden Legacy: A Folk History of J. Golden Kimball (1973) ISBN   9780879050184
  • Voices from the Bottom of the Bowl: A Folk History of Teton Valley Idaho, 1823–1952 (1991) OCLC   555590203
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    References

    1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Stanley, David (2004). Folklore in Utah: A history and guide to resources. Logan, Utah: Utah State University Press. ISBN   0874215072. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved June 5, 2019.
    2. Hand, Wayland D., ed. (1971). American Folk Legend: A Symposium. Berkeley: University of California Press. p. 202. ISBN   0520038363 . Retrieved May 30, 2019.
    3. Rudy, Jill Terry (2004). "Academic Programs". In Stanley, David (ed.). Folklore in Utah: A History and Guide to Resources. University Press of Colorado. pp. 249–261. ISBN   9780874215885. JSTOR   j.ctt46nxj8.32.
    4. Mould, Tom; Eliason, Eric A. (2014). "The State of Mormon Folklore Studies" (PDF). Mormon Studies Review. 1: 48. Archived (PDF) from the original on June 5, 2019. Retrieved June 5, 2019.
    5. Hand, Wayland D. (1986). "Folklorists in the Rocky Mountain West". The Folklore Historian. 3 (1): 6. Retrieved May 30, 2019.
    6. Dorson, Richard M., ed. (1983). Handbook of American Folklore. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. p. 156. ISBN   0253203732 . Retrieved May 30, 2019.
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    8. Alder, Douglas D. (Fall 1994). "Writing Southern Utah History: An Appraisal and a Bibliography" (PDF). Journal of Mormon History. 20 (2): 163. Archived (PDF) from the original on June 5, 2019. Retrieved June 5, 2019.
    9. Quinn, D. Michael (February 1992). "150 Years of Truth and Consequences About Mormon History" (PDF). Sunstone Magazine. Sunstone Education Foundation. Archived (PDF) from the original on June 5, 2019. Retrieved June 5, 2019.
    10. "Thomas Edward Cheney". Mormon Literature & Creative Arts. Archived from the original on July 22, 2019. Retrieved July 22, 2019.
    11. Rachel Cope; Amy Easton-Flake; Keith A. Erekson (November 29, 2017). Mormon Women's History: Beyond Biography. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press. p. 264. ISBN   978-1-61147-965-2.
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    Thomas Cheney
    Born1901
    Died1993 (aged 92)
    NationalityAmerican
    Academic background
    EducationB.A., English, Utah Agricultural College
    M.A., Mormon folk songs, University of Idaho, 1936