Thomas Dew (politician)

Last updated
Thomas Dew
7th Speaker of the Virginia House of Burgesses
In office
1652–1652
Preceded by Edward Major
Succeeded by Walter Chiles
Personal details
Diedc.1691
Residence Nansemond County, Virginia
OccupationFarmer

Thomas Dew (died c.1691) was a Virginia landowner and politician. He settled in the vicinity of the Nansemond River by 1634, and represented Upper Norfolk County in the General Assembly of 1642. He was elected to the House of Burgesses several times between 1652 and 1656, succeeding his neighbor Edward Major as Speaker in the November 1652 session. [1]

Colony of Virginia English/British possession in North America (1607–1776)

The Colony of Virginia, chartered in 1606 and settled in 1607, was the first enduring English colony in North America, following failed proprietary attempts at settlement on Newfoundland by Sir Humphrey Gilbert in 1583, and the subsequent further south Roanoke Island by Sir Walter Raleigh in the late 1580s.

A politician is a person active in party politics, or a person holding or seeking office in government. Politicians propose, support and create laws or policies that govern the land and, by extension, its people. Broadly speaking, a "politician" can be anyone who seeks to achieve political power in any bureaucratic institution.

Nansemond River river in the United States of America

The Nansemond River is a 19.8-mile-long (31.9 km) tributary of the James River in Virginia in the United States. English settlers named the river for the Nansemond tribe of Native Americans, who then inhabited the area. The river begins at the outlet of Lake Meade north of downtown Suffolk, historically marking the northern boundary of the city. The Nansemond River Light once marked the river's confluence with the James.

In 1656 he was authorized to explore the coast of North Carolina between Cape Hatteras and Cape Fear. Later in life, he became a Quaker. [1]

Notes

  1. 1 2 Kukla, pp. 47–48

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References

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