Thomas Erskine Wardle

Last updated

Thomas Erskine Wardle
Born9 January 1877 (1877-01-09)
Winshill, Burton-on-Trent, England
Died9 May 1944 (1944-05-10) (aged 67)
Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England
AllegianceUnited Kingdom
Service/branch Royal Navy
Years of service1890–1926
Rank Vice-Admiral
Commands held HM Australian Fleet (1924–26)
HMS Calliope (1923–24)
HMS Danae (1918–20)
HMS Dreadnought (1918)
HMS Lowestoft (1917–18)
HMS Alcantara (1915–16)
HMS Calyx (1914–15)
HMS Crescent (1913–14)
Battles/wars First World War
Awards Companion of the Order of the Bath
Distinguished Service Order
Order of the Rising Sun (Japan)

Vice-Admiral Thomas Erskine Wardle, CB , DSO (9 January 1877 – 9 May 1944) was a senior officer in the Royal Navy. He was the Rear-Admiral Commanding His Majesty's Australian Fleet from 30 April 1924 to 30 April 1926. [1]

Distinguished Service Order UK military decoration

The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a military decoration of the United Kingdom, and formerly of other parts of the Commonwealth, awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat. Since 1993 all ranks have been eligible.

Royal Navy Maritime warfare branch of the United Kingdoms military

The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years' War against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service.

Contents

Early life

Wardle was born on 9 January 1877 in the village of Winshill near Burton-on-Trent. [2] the son of Henry Wardle then a Member of Parliament for Burton on Trent. [3]

Winshill village in United Kingdom

Winshill is an area to the east of the town of Burton upon Trent, in the borough of East Staffordshire, England.

Henry Wardle was a British brewer and Liberal politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1885 to 1892.

Wardle joined the Royal Navy on 15 July 1890 when he entered the training ship HMS Britannia, [2] and during his career served at every Royal Navy station. He was appointed midshipman on 15 July 1892 and sub-lieutenant on 15 January 1896 [2] before being promoted to Lieutenant on 15 January 1897. [4] He was awarded the Japanese Order of the Rising Sun for services in the Far East. He was promoted to commander on 31 December 1907. [5] During the First World War he served with the 10th Cruiser Squadron under Vice Admiral Sir Dudley de Chair.

A midshipman is an officer of the junior-most rank, in the Royal Navy, United States Navy, and many Commonwealth navies. Commonwealth countries which use the rank include Canada, Australia, Bangladesh, Namibia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Pakistan, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and Kenya.

Sub-lieutenant is a junior military officer rank.

A lieutenant is the junior most commissioned officer in the armed forces, fire services, police, and other organizations of many nations.

Promoted to captain in June 1915 and later given command of the armed merchantman HMS Alcantara, he was in command during the action with the German raider SMS Greif in the North Sea. On 29 February 1916, Alcantara with HMS Andes, came upon the Greif, which appeared to be an unarmed merchant vessel. While a boarding party was leaving the Alcantara to board Greif the German vessel dropped her bulwarks and opened fire on the Alcantara. In the ensuing encounter which followed, Alcantara and Greif were sunk. [1] He spent 20 minutes in the water before being rescued. For his gallantry in this fight he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order. [6] He later was in command of HMS Danae and after the end of the First World War he served as chief of the British mission in Greece and later as part of the Reserve Fleet at the Nore, in command of HMS Calliope. [7]

North Sea marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean

The North Sea is a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean located between Great Britain, Denmark, Norway, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium and France. An epeiric sea on the European continental shelf, it connects to the ocean through the English Channel in the south and the Norwegian Sea in the north. It is more than 970 kilometres (600 mi) long and 580 kilometres (360 mi) wide, with an area of 570,000 square kilometres (220,000 sq mi).

HMS <i>Danae</i> (D44) Danae-class light cruiser

HMS Danae, during the latter part of World War II commissioned as ORP Conrad, was the lead ship of the Danae-class cruisers, serving with the Royal Navy between the world wars and with the Polish Navy during World War II.

The Reserve Fleet was a Royal Navy formation of decommissioned vessels which could be brought to a state of readiness at time of war.

He became Rear-Admiral Commanding His Majesty's Australian Fleet from 30 April 1924 until 30 April 1926. [1] He was appointed Companion of the Order of the Bath on 5 June 1926. [8] He retired at his own request on 9 July 1926, and was advanced to vice admiral. [2]

Family life

Wardle married Gwendolyne Gladys Marguerite Baird in 1902 in Glasgow, they had two children. [9] They were divorced in 1910 [9] Wardle died on 9 May 1944 at Coniston, Caledon Road, Beaconsfield. [2] [3]

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 The Argus (Melbourne, Vic) – Tuesday 22 April 1924. p10.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 "RN Officer's Service Records—Image details—Wardle, Thomas Erskine" (fee usually required to view pdf of full original service record). DocumentsOnline. The National Archives . Retrieved 3 September 2009.
  3. 1 2 "Vice-Admiral T. E. Wardle". The Times (49853). London. 11 May 1944. p. 7.
  4. "No. 26824". The London Gazette . 19 February 1897. p. 988.
  5. "No. 28096". The London Gazette . 3 January 1908. p. 34.
  6. "No. 29635". The London Gazette (Supplement). 20 June 1916. p. 6211.
  7. The Argus (Melbourne, Vic) – Friday 4 January 1924. p7.
  8. "No. 28096". The London Gazette . 2 July 1926. p. 4403.
  9. 1 2 "Probate, Divorce and Admiralty Division - Wardle v Wardle and Fox". The Times (39199). London. 18 February 1910. p. 3.

Related Research Articles

Bruce Fraser, 1st Baron Fraser of North Cape Royal Navy admiral of the fleet

Admiral of the Fleet Bruce Austin Fraser, 1st Baron Fraser of North Cape, was a senior Royal Navy officer. He served in the First World War, saw action during the Gallipoli Campaign and took part in the internment of the German High Seas Fleet at the end of the war. He also served in the Second World War initially as Third Sea Lord and Controller of the Navy and then as second-in-command and afterwards as commander of the Home Fleet, leading the force that destroyed the German battleship Scharnhorst. He went on to be First Sea Lord and Chief of the Naval Staff in which role he assisted in establishing NATO and agreed to the principle that the Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic should be an American admiral, in the face of fierce British opposition.

Rosslyn Wemyss, 1st Baron Wester Wemyss Royal Navy admiral of the fleet

Admiral of the Fleet Rosslyn Erskine Wemyss, 1st Baron Wester Wemyss,, known as Sir Rosslyn Wemyss between 1916 and 1919, was a Royal Navy officer. During the First World War he served as commander of the 12th Cruiser Squadron and then as Governor of Moudros before leading the British landings at Cape Helles and at Suvla Bay during the Gallipoli Campaign. He went on to be Commander of the East Indies & Egyptian Squadron in January 1916 and then First Sea Lord in December 1917, in which role he encouraged Admiral Roger Keyes, Commander of the Dover Patrol, to undertake more vigorous operations in the Channel, ultimately leading to the launch of the Zeebrugge Raid in April 1918.

Frederick Field (Royal Navy officer) British Royal Navy officer

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Frederick Laurence Field, was a senior Royal Navy officer. He served in the Boxer Rebellion as commander of a raiding party and in the First World War as commanding officer of the battleship HMS King George V, flagship of Admiral Martyn Jerram at the Battle of Jutland in May 1916. He went on to be Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Fleet before serving as First Sea Lord during the early 1930s in which role dealt with the response to the Invergordon Mutiny in September 1931 and ensured the abandonment in 1932 of the 'ten year rule', an attempt by the treasury to control defence expenditure by requesting the Foreign Office to declare whether there was any risk of war during the next ten years.

John Cunningham (Royal Navy officer) British Royal Navy officer, born 1885

Admiral of the Fleet Sir John Henry Dacres Cunningham was a Royal Navy officer. A qualified senior navigator, he became Director of Plans at the Admiralty in 1930. He saw action as Commander-in-Chief of the Mediterranean Fleet during the Second World War with responsibility for the allied landings at Anzio and in the south of France. He served as First Sea Lord in the late 1940s: his focus was on implementing the Government's policy of scrapping a large number of serviceable ships.

Caspar John Royal Navy admiral of the fleet

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Caspar John GCB was a senior Royal Navy officer who served as First Sea Lord from 1960 to 1963. He was a pioneer in the Fleet Air Arm and fought in the Second World War in a cruiser taking part in the Atlantic convoys, participating in the Norwegian campaign and transporting arms around the Cape of Good Hope to Egypt for use in the western desert campaign. His war service continued as Director-General of Naval Aircraft Production, as naval air attaché at the British embassy in Washington D.C. and then as Commanding Officer of two aircraft carriers. He went on to serve as First Sea Lord and Chief of the Naval Staff in the early 1960s. In that capacity he was primarily concerned with plans for the building of the new CVA-01 aircraft-carriers.

1st Battle Squadron

The 1st Battle Squadron was a naval squadron of the British Royal Navy consisting of battleships. The 1st Battle Squadron was initially part of the Royal Navy's Grand Fleet. After World War I the Grand Fleet was reverted to its original name, the Atlantic Fleet. The squadron changed composition often as ships were damaged, retired or transferred.

George Hyde (admiral) Australian admiral

Admiral Sir George Francis Hyde, was an English-born Australian admiral, known as a former head and the first officer to achieve the rank of full admiral in the Royal Australian Navy.

Richard Webb (Royal Navy officer) Royal Navy admiral

Admiral Sir Richard Webb was a British Royal Navy officer.

David Norris (Royal Navy officer) Royal Navy admiral

Admiral David Thomas Norris CB CMG was a British Royal Navy officer.

Arthur Leveson Royal Navy admiral

Admiral Sir Arthur Cavenagh Leveson GCB was a senior officer in the Royal Navy. He was the Rear Admiral Commanding His Majesty's Australian Fleet from 9 January 1917 to 3 September 1918 and later Commander in Chief, China Station from 10 September 1922 to 22 April 1925.

Admiral Sir Albert Percy Addison, was a senior officer in the Royal Navy. He was the Rear Admiral Commanding His Majesty's Australian Fleet from 30 April 1922 to 30 April 1924. During the First World War he was recognised by the British Admiralty as an authority on submarines, and his knowledge of that class of ship was used extensively.

Rear Admiral Leonard Stanley Holbrook MVO was a senior officer in the Royal Navy. He was the Commodore Commanding His Majesty's Australian Squadron from 29 May 1931 to 7 April 1932.

Wilbraham Ford Royal Navy admiral

Admiral Sir Wilbraham Tennyson Randle Ford, was a senior officer in the Royal Navy. He was the Rear Admiral Commanding His Majesty's Australian Squadron from April 1934 to April 1936.

Vice Admiral Sir Richard Hayden Owen Lane-Poole was a senior officer in the Royal Navy. He was the Rear Admiral Commanding His Majesty's Australian Squadron from 1936 to 1938.

Action of 29 February 1916

The Action of 29 February 1916 was a naval engagement fought during the First World War between the United Kingdom and the German Empire. SMS Greif a German commerce raider, broke out into the North Sea and Admiral Sir John Jellicoe dispatched Royal Navy warships to intercept the raider. Four British vessels made contact with the Greif and in the ensuing encounter, the commerce raider and the armed merchant cruiser HMS Alcantara were sunk.

Charles Pizey Royal Navy officer

Admiral Sir Charles Thomas Mark Pizey was a Royal Navy officer who served as the last Commander-in-Chief and first Chief of Naval Staff of the Indian Navy from 1951 to 1955.

George Creasy Royal Navy admiral of the fleet

Admiral of the Fleet Sir George Elvey Creasy, was a senior Royal Navy officer. After serving as a junior officer in the First World War, during which he took part in operations at Heligoland Bight in 1917, he trained as a torpedo officer.

James Erskine (Royal Navy officer) British Royal Navy officer

Admiral of the Fleet Sir James Elphinstone Erskine was a Royal Navy officer. As a junior officer he served on the North America and West Indies Station. This was a difficult time in relations between the United Kingdom and the United States following the Trent Affair, an international diplomatic incident that occurred during the American Civil War when the United States Navy frigate USS San Jacinto intercepted the British mail packet RMS Trent.

Vice-Admiral Sir Stephen Hope Carlill was a Royal Navy admiral who served as the last British Chief of Naval Staff of the Indian Navy from 1955 to 1958, when he was succeeded by Vice-Admiral Ram Dass Katari.

Admiral Charles Duncan Johnson, CB, DSO, MVO was a Royal Navy officer who became Admiral Superintendent of Malta Dockyard.

References

Military offices
Preceded by
Rear-Admiral Albert Addison
Rear-Admiral Commanding HM Australian Fleet
1924–1926
Succeeded by
Rear-Admiral Sir George Hyde
as Rear-Admiral Commanding HM Australian Squadron