Thomas Foote

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  1. John Foote of St Benet Gracechurch, Margret Brooke, spinster, of the same were granted a marriage licences 10 April 1581, and were married 11 April 1581, at St Mary Woolchurch. [1]
  2. Sir John Cutler was satirised by Alexander Pope for avarice. [1]
  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Watkins 1897, p. 140.
  2. Watkins 1897, pp. 139–140.
  3. Shaw 1906, p. 224.

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References

Sir
Thomas Foote, 1st Baronet
Lord Mayor of the City of London
In office
1649–1649
Civic offices
Preceded by Lord Mayor of the City of London
1649
Succeeded by
Baronetage of England
New creation Baronet
(of London)
1660–1687
Succeeded by
Extinct
(reversion to Arthur Onslow)