Thomas Grey, 2nd Earl of Stamford

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The Earl of Stamford

PC
Thomas Grey, 2nd Earl of Stamford.jpg
President of the Board of Trade
In office
9 June 1699 19 June 1702
Monarch William III
Anne
Preceded by The Earl of Bridgewater
Succeeded by The Viscount Weymouth
In office
1705 12 June 1711
Monarch Anne
Preceded byThe Viscount Weymouth
Succeeded by The Earl of Winchilsea
Personal details
Born1654
Died31 January 1720

Thomas Grey, 2nd Earl of Stamford, PC (c. 1654 – 31 January 1720) was a British peer and politician. [1]

Privy Council of England Body of advisers to the sovereign of the Kingdom of England

The Privy Council of England, also known as HisMajesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, was a body of advisers to the sovereign of the Kingdom of England. Its members were often senior members of the House of Lords and the House of Commons, together with leading churchmen, judges, diplomats and military leaders.

Contents

Grey was the only son of Thomas, Lord Grey of Groby, and inherited his title from his grandfather. [1] His mother was Lady Dorothy Bourchier, daughter of Edward Bourchier, 4th Earl of Bath.

Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford English Earl

Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford, known as the Lord Grey of Groby from 1614 to 1628, was an English nobleman and military leader. He was the eldest son of Sir John Grey and Elizabeth Nevill. His mother was probably a daughter of Edward Nevill, 8th Baron Bergavenny and his wife Rachel Lennard.

Edward Bourchier, 4th Earl of Bath Nobleman

Edward Bourchier, 4th Earl of Bath.

Grey took some part in resisting the arbitrary actions of James II, and was arrested in July 1685. After his release he took up arms on behalf of William of Orange in the Glorious Revolution, after whose accession to the throne he was made a Privy Counsellor (1694) and Lord Lieutenant of Devon (1696). [1] Politically he was described as an "unrepentant Whig", who reaffirmed his belief in the Popish Plot by voting against the motion to reverse the attainder on William Howard, 1st Viscount Stafford.

James II of England 17th-century King of England and Ireland, and of Scotland (as James VII)

James II and VII was King of England and Ireland as James II and King of Scotland as James VII, from 6 February 1685 until he was deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1688. The last Roman Catholic monarch of England, Scotland and Ireland, his reign is now remembered primarily for struggles over religious tolerance. However, it also involved the principles of absolutism and divine right of kings and his deposition ended a century of political and civil strife by confirming the primacy of Parliament over the Crown.

William III of England Stadtholder, Prince of Orange and King of England, Scotland and Ireland

William III, also widely known as William of Orange, was sovereign Prince of Orange from birth, Stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Gelderland and Overijssel in the Dutch Republic from 1672 and King of England, Ireland and Scotland from 1689 until his death in 1702. As King of Scotland, he is known as William II. He is sometimes informally known in Northern Ireland and Scotland as "King Billy".

Glorious Revolution 17th Century British revolution

The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England by a union of English Parliamentarians with the Dutch stadtholder William III, Prince of Orange, who was James's nephew and son-in-law. William's successful invasion of England with a Dutch fleet and army led to his ascension to the throne as William III of England jointly with his wife, Mary II, James's daughter, after the Declaration of Right, leading to the Bill of Rights 1689.

In 1697 he became Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, and in 1699 President of the Board of Trade, being dismissed from his office upon the accession of Anne in 1702. From 1707 to 1711, however, he was again President of the Board of Trade. [1]

Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster ministerial office in Her Majestys Government

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is a ministerial office in the Government of the United Kingdom that includes as part of its duties, the administration of the estates and rents of the Duchy of Lancaster. The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is appointed by the Sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister.

President of the Board of Trade head of the Board of Trade, a committee of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom

The President of the Board of Trade is head of the Board of Trade. This is a committee of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom, first established as a temporary committee of inquiry in the 17th century, that evolved gradually into a government department with a diverse range of functions. The current holder is Liam Fox, the Secretary of State for International Trade.

Anne, Queen of Great Britain Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland (1702–07); queen of Great Britain and Ireland (1707–14)

Anne was the Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland between 8 March 1702 and 1 May 1707. On 1 May 1707, under the Acts of Union, two of her realms, the kingdoms of England and Scotland, united as a single sovereign state known as Great Britain. She continued to reign as Queen of Great Britain and Ireland until her death in 1714.

On his death without children, his titles and Leicestershire estate at Bradgate Park passed to his first cousin Henry Grey, 3rd Earl of Stamford (1685–1739), a grandson of the first earl, from whom the later earls were descended. [1]

Leicestershire County of England

Leicestershire is a landlocked county in the English Midlands. The county borders Nottinghamshire to the north, Lincolnshire to the north-east, Rutland to the east, Northamptonshire to the south-east, Warwickshire to the south-west, Staffordshire to the west, and Derbyshire to the north-west. The border with most of Warwickshire is Watling Street.

Bradgate Park public park in Charnwood Forest, in Leicestershire, England

Bradgate Park is a public park in Charnwood Forest, in Leicestershire, England, northwest of Leicester. It covers 850 acres. The park lies between the villages of Newtown Linford, Anstey, Cropston, Woodhouse Eaves and Swithland. The River Lin runs through the park, flowing into Cropston Reservoir which was constructed on part of the park. To the north-east lies Swithland Wood. The park's two well known landmarks, Old John and the war memorial, both lie just above the 210 m (690 ft) contour. The park is part of the 399.3 hectare Bradgate Park and Cropston Reservoir Site of Special Scientific Interest, which has been designated under both biological and geological criteria.

See also

List of deserters from James II to William of Orange

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Wikisource-logo.svg One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Stamford, Henry Grey, 1st Earl of"  . Encyclopædia Britannica . 25 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 769.

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References

Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl of Huntingdon
Custos Rotulorum of Leicestershire
1689–1702
Succeeded by
The Earl of Rutland
Preceded by
The Earl of Bath
Lord Lieutenant of Devon
1696–1702
Succeeded by
The Earl Poulett
Custos Rotulorum of Devon
1696–1711
Political offices
Preceded by
The Lord Willoughby de Eresby
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1697–1702
Succeeded by
Sir John Leveson-Gower
Preceded by
The Earl of Bridgewater
President of the Board of Trade
1699–1702
Succeeded by
The Viscount Weymouth
Preceded by
The Viscount Weymouth
President of the Board of Trade
1707–1711
Succeeded by
The Earl of Winchilsea
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Henry Grey
Earl of Stamford
1673–1720
Succeeded by
Henry Grey