Thomas Hanford

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Thomas Hanford
BornJuly 22, 1621
Died1693
Resting placePlot 210, East Norwalk Historical Cemetery, Norwalk, Connecticut
Occupationclergy
Spouse(s)Eglin Hatherly

, Mary Miles Ince (m.

October 22, 1661, New Haven Colony)
ChildrenTheophilus Hanford, Mary Hanford, Hannah Hanford Platt, Elizabeth Hanford Burr, Thomas Hanford, Jr. Eleazer Hanford, Elnathan Hanford, Samuel Hanford, Eunice Hanford Bulkley, Sarah Hanford Comstock [1]

Thomas Hanford (July 22, 1621 – 1693) was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was the first minister in Norwalk, and continued in charge of the settlement's church for forty-one years, until his death in 1693. In addition to his spiritual leadership, he also served as the civic leader and school teacher of the settlement. [2]

Contents

Early life and family

He was born in Fremington (near Barnstable), Devonshire, England, on July 22, 1621, the son of Theophilus Jeffrey Hanford and Eglin Hatherly.

Life in America

His mother, Eglin Hatherly Hanford, with Thomas' sisters, Margaret and Elizabeth, departed from London aboard the ship Planter on April 8, 1635. They arrived in Boston on June 7, 1635.

Thomas followed his mother at a later time in order to finish his studies in England. However, it appears that he did not finish in England, as he completed his studies in Massachusetts Bay Colony with Charles Chauncy, who later became the second president of Harvard University.

By 1643, he was in Scituate, Massachusetts, which was founded by his mother's brother, Timothy Hatherly.

He became a freeman of Massachusetts in 1650. In 1651 he went to Roxbury, Connecticut, to teach school. He taught for four months, but became discouraged by his students and quit in June 1652, citing ill health. [3] [4]

Life in Norwalk

In 1652, Hanford, being "an orthodox and approved minister," was invited to join the settlement at Norwalk as the first minister of the First Congregational Church. [5] [6] He was ordained in Hartford on May 18, 1654. The town gave him a lot of four acres, and built him a house. He was also given an island by a Winnipauk Indian named Sagamore, which today is called Sheffield Island. [6]

He is listed on the Founders Stone bearing the names of the founding settlers of Norwalk in the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery.

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Roger Ludlow English lawyer, founder and deputy governor of Connecticut Colony

Roger Ludlow (1590–1664) was an English lawyer, magistrate, military officer, and colonist. He was active in the founding of the Colony of Connecticut, and helped draft laws for it and the nearby Massachusetts Bay Colony. Under his and John Mason's direction, Boston's first fortification, later known as Castle William and then Fort Independence was built on Castle Island in Boston harbor. Frequently at odds with his peers, he eventually also founded Fairfield and Norwalk before leaving New England entirely.

History of Norwalk, Connecticut

The history of Norwalk, Connecticut ranges from pre-contact cultures and Native Americans to the 21st century.

William Wadsworth was an early pioneer of New England, a founder of Hartford, Connecticut and the patriarch of numerous and prominent Wadsworth descendants of North America, including the poet Ezra Pound.

Matthew Mead was a Lieutenant Colonel who served on George Washington's staff in the American Revolutionary War. He was a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives from Norwalk in the sessions of May 1779, May and October 1780, May and October 1781.

East Norwalk Historical Cemetery

Established in 1655, the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery is Norwalk's oldest cemetery, and many of the area's first settlers are buried there. The cemetery is owned and maintained by the Third Taxing District, formally known as the East Norwalk Fire District of the Town of Norwalk, and before that it was known as the Down Town School District. Triangle shaped and surrounded clockwise by Gregory Boulevard, Cemetery Street and East Avenue it is situated in the neighborhood of East Norwalk 41°6′9.22″N73°24′11.95″W.

Matthew Canfield was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut and Newark, New Jersey. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony representing Norwalk in the sessions of May 1654, May 1655, May 1656, May 1657, May 1658, May 1659, May 1660, May 1661, May and October 1662, October 1663, May and October 1664, May and October 1665, and May and October 1666.

Matthew Marvin Sr. was a founding settler of Hartford and Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the May 1654 session. He served as a magistrate in 1659.

Walter Hoyt was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He served as a deputy of the General Court of the Connecticut Colony from Norwalk between 1658 and 1662, and, when it was renamed, as a deputy of the Connecticut General Assembly between 1662 and 1681. He was a Norwalk selectman in 1672.

Thomas Hales was a founding settler of Hartford, and Norwalk, Connecticut. He was the son of Thomas Hale, born 1590 in Hertfordshire, England, and Joan Kirby Hale, born 1590, died 1640.

Nathaniel Haies was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a signer of the treaty with the Norwalke Indians in 1655.

Ralph Keeler was a founding settler of both Hartford, and Norwalk, Connecticut, United States.

Jonathan Marsh (1621–1672) was a founding settler of the New Haven Colony, and of Norwalk, Connecticut. He came to Norwalk from New Haven sometime prior to March 1656. He was the settlement's miller.

John Ruscoe was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut.

Walter Keeler was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. There is very little information on him in the historical records. He is listed among the "Table of Estates" settlers of 1655. He is the brother of Ralph Keeler, the Norwalk settler who is listed among the "Ludlow Agreement" settlers of 1650.

Samuel Smith was an early settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a deputy of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the May 1691 session.

John Belding was an early settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a member of the General Assembly of the Colony of Connecticut from Norwalk in the sessions of October 1691 and May 1705.

John Reed was a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives from Norwalk, Connecticut Colony in the May 1715 and October 1717 sessions.

Joseph Birchard was a member of the Connecticut House of Representatives from Norwalk, Connecticut Colony in the sessions of May 1730 and May 1734.

John Dwight (died 1661) American settler (died 1661)

John Dwight was one of the first settlers of Dedham, Massachusetts and progenitor of the Dwight family.

References

  1. History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield
  2. "Norwalk Historical Society - The Norwalk Town House, Part 1". www.norwalkhistoricalsociety.org. Retrieved 2016-04-18.
  3. Judd, Peter H. (2008-01-01). Four American Ancestries: White, Griggs, Cowles, Judd, Including Haring, Phelps, Denison, Clark, Foote, Coley, Haight, Ayers, and Related Families. Peter Haring Judd. ISBN   9781427637666.
  4. New Haven Town Records: General Court for New Haven, November 14, 1651, November 17, 1651, March 11, 1651/2, and June 7, 1652.
  5. Bouton, Nathaniel (1851-01-01). An Historical Discourse in Commemoration of the Two-hundredth Anniversary of the Settlement of Norwalk, Ct., in 1651: Delivered in the First Congregational Church in Norwalk, July 9, 1851. S.W. Benedict.
  6. 1 2 The Ancient Historical Records of Norwalk, Connecticut: With a Plan of the Ancient Settlement, and of the Town in 1847. J. Mallory & Company. 1847-01-01.