Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke

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The Earl of Pembroke and Montgomery

Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke by John Greenhill.jpg
Thomas Herbert by John Greenhill
First Lord of the Admiralty
In office
1690–1692
Monarch William III and Mary II
Preceded by The Earl of Torrington
Succeeded by The Lord Cornwallis
Lord Privy Seal
In office
1692–1699
Preceded byIn Commission
Last held by Lord Halifax
Succeeded by The Viscount Lonsdale
Lord President of the Council
In office
18 May 1699 29 January 1702
Monarch William III
Preceded by The Duke of Leeds
Succeeded by The Duke of Somerset
In office
9 July 1702 25 November 1708
Monarch Anne
Preceded by The Duke of Somerset
Succeeded by The Lord Somers
Personal details
Born1656 (1656)
Died22 January 1733(1733-01-22) (aged 76–77)
Spouse(s)
Margaret Sawyer(m. 1684)
Barbara Slingsby
(m. 1708;died 1721)
Mary Howe(undated)
Coat of arms of Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke, 5th Earl of Montgomery, KG, PC, PRS Coat of arms of Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke, 5th Earl of Montgomery, KG, PC, PRS.png
Coat of arms of Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke, 5th Earl of Montgomery, KG, PC, PRS

Thomas Herbert, 8th Earl of Pembroke and 5th Earl of Montgomery, KG , PC , PRS (c. 1656 22 January 1733), styled The Honourable Thomas Herbert until 1683, was an English and later British statesman during the reigns of William III and Anne.

Contents

Background

Herbert was the third son of Philip Herbert, 5th Earl of Pembroke and his wife Catharine Villiers, daughter of Sir William Villiers, 1st Baronet. He was educated at Tonbridge School, Kent. Both of his brothers (the 6th Earl and the 7th Earl) having died without a male heir, he succeeded to the earldoms in 1683.

Public life

Herbert was returned unopposed as Member of Parliament for Wilton at the two general elections of 1679 and the general election of 1681. [1] He was no longer able to sit in the House of Commons after assuming the peerage in 1683. From 1690 to 1692 as Lord Pembroke, he was First Lord of the Admiralty. He then served as Lord Privy Seal until 1699, being in 1697 the first plenipotentiary of Great Britain at the congress of Ryswick. On two occasions he was Lord High Admiral for a short period; he was also Lord President of the Council and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, while he acted as one of the Lords Justices seven times; and he was President of the Royal Society in 16891690. [2] He is the dedicatee of John Locke's An Essay Concerning Human Understanding and Thomas Greenhill's The Art of Embalming.

Marriages and progeny

He married three times:

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References

  1. "HERBERT, Hon. Thomas (c.1656-1733), of Wilton, Wilts". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 18 December 2018.
  2. Wikisource-logo.svg One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Pembroke, Earls of". Encyclopædia Britannica . 21 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 80.
  3. Pedigree of Arundell of Trerice, Vivian, J.L., ed. (1887). The Visitations of Cornwall: comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1530, 1573 & 1620; with additions by J.L. Vivian. Exeter: W. Pollard, p. 14
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Thomas Mompesson
John Berkenhead
Member of Parliament for Wilton
1679–1683
With: Thomas Penruddocke 1679
Sir John Nicholas 1679–1683
Succeeded by
Sir John Nicholas
Oliver Nicholas
Political offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Torrington
First Lord of the Admiralty
1690–1692
Succeeded by
The Lord Cornwallis
Preceded by
In Commission
Lord Privy Seal
1692–1699
Succeeded by
The Viscount Lonsdale
Preceded by
The Duke of Leeds
Lord President of the Council
1699–1702
Succeeded by
The Duke of Somerset
Preceded by
The Earl of Bridgewater
(First Lord of the Admiralty)
Lord High Admiral
1701–1702
Succeeded by
Prince George of Denmark
Preceded by
The Duke of Somerset
Lord President of the Council
1702–1708
Succeeded by
The Lord Somers
Preceded by
The Duke of Ormonde
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
1707–1708
Succeeded by
The Earl of Wharton
Preceded by
Queen Anne
Lord High Admiral
1708–1709
Succeeded by
The Earl of Orford
(First Lord of the Admiralty)
Military offices
New regiment Colonel of the 2nd Maritime Regiment
1690–1691
Succeeded by
Henry Killigrew
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl of Pembroke
Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire
jointly with The Earl of Yarmouth 16881689

16831733
Succeeded by
The Earl of Pembroke
Custos Rotulorum of Glamorgan
16831728
Succeeded by
The Duke of Bolton
Custos Rotulorum of Pembrokeshire
16831715
Succeeded by
Sir Arthur Owen, Bt
Preceded by
The Earl of Macclesfield
Lord Lieutenant of Pembrokeshire
16941715
Lord Lieutenant of Brecknockshire and Monmouthshire
16941715
Succeeded by
John Morgan
Lord Lieutenant of Cardiganshire
16941715
Succeeded by
The Viscount Lisburne
Lord Lieutenant of Carmarthenshire
16941715
Vacant
Title next held by
George Rice
Lord Lieutenant of Glamorgan
16941715
Vacant
Title next held by
The Duke of Bolton
Lord Lieutenant of Radnorshire
16941715
Succeeded by
The Lord Coningsby
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Philip Herbert
Earl of Pembroke
16831733
Succeeded by
Henry Herbert