Thomas J. Campbell (American football)

Last updated
Thomas J. Campbell
TJCampbell.png
Campbell pictured in Yackety yak 1917, UNC yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1886-10-27)October 27, 1886
Gardner, Massachusetts
DiedFebruary 28, 1972(1972-02-28) (aged 85)
South Natick, Massachusetts
Playing career
1910–1911 Harvard
Position(s) Halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1912 Morristown HS (NJ)
1913–1914 Harvard (assistant)
1915 Bowdoin
1916–1919 North Carolina
1922 Virginia
1923–1924 Harvard (freshmen)
Head coaching record
Overall16–16–2 (college)

Thomas Joseph Campbell (October 27, 1886 – February 28, 1972) [1] [2] was an American banker and football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Bowdoin College in 1915, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1916 to 1919, and at the University of Virginia in 1922, compiling a career college football record of 16–16–2. Campbell played football at Harvard University, from which he graduated in 1912. [3]

Contents

Campbell married Mildred Bell in 1920 in New York.

Coaching career

From 1916 to 1919, Campbell served as the head coach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he compiled a 9–7–1 record. From 1917 to 1918, he served in the military during World War I while North Carolina's football program was suspended. In 1922, Campbell coached at the University of Virginia, tallying a mark of 4–4–1.

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Bowdoin Polar Bears ()(1915)
1915 Bowdoin3–5
Bowdoin:3–5
North Carolina Tar Heels (South Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1916–1919)
1916 North Carolina 5–43–1T–5th
1917 No team—World War I
1918 No team—World War I
1919 North Carolina 4–3–13–1T–3rd
North Carolina:9–7–16–2
Virginia Cavaliers (Southern Conference)(1922)
1922 Virginia 4–4–11–1–19th
Virginia:4–4–11–1–1
Total:16–16–2

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References

  1. "Thomas J. Campbell . . . former Middlesex County Bank VP". The Lowell Sun . Lowell, Massachusetts. March 1, 1972. p. 42. Retrieved September 14, 2016 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  2. "Media Center: Harvard Crimson Football All-Time Letterwinners". Harvard University . Retrieved April 13, 2012.