Thomas J. Geraghty

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Thomas J. Geraghty
Thomas J. Geraghty.jpg
Geraghty in 1920
Born(1883-04-10)April 10, 1883
DiedJune 5, 1945(1945-06-05) (aged 62)
OccupationScreenwriter
Years active1917–1939
Children Carmelita Geraghty
Maurice Geraghty
Gerald Geraghty

Thomas J. Geraghty (April 10, 1883 June 5, 1945), was an American screenwriter. [1] He wrote for 70 films between 1917 and 1939. During the 1930s he went to the United Kingdom, where he wrote a number of screenplays. He was born in Rushville, Indiana, and died in Hollywood, California. In April 1924, Geraghty was credited with coining the soon-to-be-popular vaudeville pun, "The Thief of Badgags". [2]

Contents

Selected filmography

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References

  1. "The Geraghty's of Hollywood". B Westerns. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  2. F.P.A. (April 27, 1924). "The Conning Tower: Remembrance of Things Past". The Buffalo Courier. p. 78. Retrieved September 7, 2021.