Thomas Lowe (priest)

Last updated

Thomas Hill Peregrine Furye Lowe (21 December 1781 – 17 January 1861) was an English cleric. [1] [2] He was Dean of Exeter [3] from 1839 [4] to his death. [5]

Contents

Life

He was the son of Thomas Humphrey Lowe and Lucy Hill, daughter of Thomas Hill. [1] He matriculated at Trinity College, Oxford in 1799, graduating B.A. in 1803, and M.A. in 1805. In 1804 he entered Lincoln's Inn. [2]

Lowe was a curate at Shelsley Beauchamp, Worcestershire, in 1810. In 1812 he had a post as domestic chaplain with Henry Hall Gage, 4th Viscount Gage, and in 1814 another curacy, at Diddlebury in Shropshire. [6] In 1820 he became vicar of Grimley, Worcestershire. He was rector of Holy Trinity, Exeter from 1837 to 1840, and Dean of Exeter from 1839 for the rest of his life. [2]

He published in 1825 An essay on the absolving power of the Church. [7]

Family

Lowe married in 1808 Ellen Lucy Pardoe (died 1843), eldest daughter of George Pardoe of Nash Court, Shropshire. [8] Their children were: [9]

Related Research Articles

Thomas Holland (translator)

Thomas Holland was an English Calvinist scholar and theologian, and one of the translators of the King James Version of the Bible.

Albemarle Bertie, 9th Earl of Lindsey

Lieutenant-General Albemarle Bertie, 9th Earl of Lindsey was a British nobleman and general.

Edwyn Burnaby of Baggrave Hall, Leicestershire, was an English landowner, courtier, a Justice of the Peace, Deputy Lieutenant, and High Sheriff of Leicestershire in 1864. He succeeded his father in the Court post of Gentleman of the Privy chamber.

Sir Richard Onslow was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1628 and 1664. He fought on the Parliamentary side during the English Civil War. He was the grandson of one Speaker of the House of Commons and the grandfather of another, both also called Richard Onslow.

Hugh Fortescue (1665–1719)

Hugh Fortescue of Filleigh and Weare Giffard Hall in Devon and of Ebrington Manor in Gloucestershire, was a British landowner and Whig politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons between 1689 and 1713.

Sir Hugh Acland, 6th Baronet

Sir Hugh Acland, 6th Baronet of Killerton Devon was a British landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1721 to 1727.

Grandage Edwards Powell was an Anglican bishop in the second quarter of the 20th century.

Richard Strode (died 1669)

Sir Richard Strode of Newnham, Plympton St Mary, Devon and of Chalmington in Dorset, was a member of the Devonshire gentry who served as MP for Bere Alston in 1604, Bridport in 1626 and for Plympton Erle in 1640. He was by religion a puritan and towards the end of his life a baptist. During the Civil War he was a parliamentarian and raised a force of 3,000 dragoons.

William Strode (1614–1676)

Sir William Strode of Newnham, Plympton St Mary, Devon, was a member of the Devonshire gentry and twice served as MP for his family's pocket borough of Plympton Erle, in 1660 and 1661–1676.

Sir John Davie, 1st Baronet

Sir John Davie, 1st Baronet (1588–1654) of Creedy in the parish of Sandford, near Crediton, Devon, was a member of the Devonshire gentry and served as Member of Parliament for Tiverton in 1621-2 and as Sheriff of Devon (1629–1630). He was created a baronet in 1641.

Charles Talbot was an English churchman, Dean of Exeter from 1802, and Dean of Salisbury from 1809.

Sir John Davie, 2nd Baronet

Sir John Davie, 2nd Baronet (1612–1678) of Creedy in the parish of Sandford, Devon, was Member of Parliament for Tavistock, Devon, in 1661 and was Sheriff of Devon from 1670 to 1671.

Sir Thomas Carew, 1st Baronet of Haccombe, Devon, was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1661 to 1674.

Edward Bickersteth (Dean of Lichfield)

Edward Bickersteth was an Anglican priest in the 19th century.

Downes, Crediton

Downes House is situated about one mile east of Crediton in Devon. The house is an 18th-century Palladian re-modelling of an earlier house. It was classed Grade II* listed on 20 May 1985. Nearby is the site of a Roman villa, revealed by crop-marks as a rectangular enclosure containing a winged-corridor structure. In 2012 the estate comprised 1400 acres, including the Home Farm, Fordton Barton, Uton Barton, Dunscombe Farm and other land 110 acres and parkland.

Arthur Annesley was a British land-owner and a Member of Parliament for Oxford from 1790 to 1796.

Newnham Park Historic estate in Devon, England

Newnham Park is an historic estate in the civil parish of Sparkwell, Devon, UK. It was known as Loughtor until about 1700 when the ancient Strode family, long seated at Newnham, about 1 mile south-east of the manor house of Loughtor, abandoned Newnham and moved their residence to Loughtor where they built a new mansion house which they renamed "Newnham Park". In 2014 the mansion house with an estate of about 1,550 acres is still owned by a descendant of the Courtenay and Strode families which held the estate from the 15th century, and which were well established in the county of Devon long before that time. In 2014 part of the estate is operated as a commercial clay-pigeon shooting ground.

Creedy, Sandford Historic estate in Devon, England

Creedy is an historic estate in the parish of Sandford, near Crediton in Devon. It is named from its location on the west side of the River Creedy. It was the seat of the Davie family from about 1600 until the late 20th century. The mansion house on the estate has been called at various times New House, Creedy House, and as presently, Creedy Park. It was first built in about 1600, rebuilt in 1846, burnt down in 1915 and rebuilt 1916–21. It is surrounded by a large park, the boundary of which is enclosed by a stone and brick wall several miles long.

Lucy Herbert, Countess of Powis, formerly Lady Lucy Graham, was the wife of Edward Herbert, 2nd Earl of Powis.

John Strode (c. 1561 – 1642)

Sir John Strode, of the Middle Temple, London and Chantmarle, Cattistock, Dorset, was an English MP for Bridport in 1621 and 1625.

References

  1. 1 2 Burke, John (1838). A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, Enjoying Territorial Possessions Or High Official Rank: But Univested with Heritable Honours. H. Colburn. pp. 38–9. Retrieved 12 November 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 s:Alumni Oxonienses: the Members of the University of Oxford, 1715-1886/Lowe, Thomas (Hill Peregrine Furye)
  3. List to Deans to 1839 Archived 9 May 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  4. The Times , Monday, 2 Sep 1839; pg. 4; Issue 17136; col E "Dr. Lowe was confirmed as Dean of Exeter on Friday, and enthroned on Saturday last.-Hereford Journal"
  5. The Times , Wednesday, 3 Jul 1861; pg. 6; Issue 23975; col A From the LONDON GAZETTE of Tuesday, 2 July. Whitehall, 1 July
  6. "Lowe, Thomas Hill(1810–1834) (CCEd Person ID 121833)". The Clergy of the Church of England Database 1540–1835 . Retrieved 12 November 2017.
  7. Lowe, Thomas Hill (1825). An essay on the absolving power of the Church. At the University Press for the author. Retrieved 12 November 2017.
  8. Crisp, Frederick Arthur (1917). "Visitation of England and Wales". Internet Archive . p. 119. Retrieved 12 November 2017.
  9. Crisp, Frederick Arthur (1909). "Visitation of England and Wales". Internet Archive . pp. 149–53. Retrieved 12 November 2017.
Church of England titles
Preceded by Dean of Exeter
18391861
Succeeded by