Thomas M. Scott

Last updated
Thomas Moore Scott
Thomas M. Scott.jpg
Born1829 (1829)
Athens, Georgia
DiedApril 21, 1876(1876-04-21) (aged 46–47)
New Orleans, Louisiana
Buried
Greenwood Cemetery,
New Orleans
AllegianceFlag of the Confederate States of America (1865).svg  Confederate States of America
Service/branchBattle flag of the Confederate States of America.svg  Confederate States Army
Years of service1861–1865
Rank Brigadier General
Commands held12th Louisiana Infantry Regiment
Scott's Brigade
Battles/wars American Civil War

Thomas Moore Scott (1829 April 21, 1876) was a Confederate States Army brigadier general during the American Civil War. He saw active service in several battles in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. He was a planter before and after the war.

Contents

Early life

Thomas M. Scott was born in Athens, Georgia in 1829 but moved to Louisiana, Tennessee, back to LaGrange, Georgia and finally back to Louisiana where he was a planter. [1] [2]

American Civil War

Scott was appointed colonel of the 12th Louisiana Infantry Regiment on August 13, 1861. [1] [2] [3] He served at the Battle of Belmont, although not actively engaged, and at the battles of Island Number Ten, New Madrid, Fort Pillow, the Siege of Vicksburg, including the Battle of Baker's Creek and the operations of General Joseph E. Johnston in Mississippi in which he tried to relieve the forces besieged at Vicksburg, and during the Atlanta Campaign, initially under the command of Lieutenant General Leonidas Polk. [2] [3]

Scott was promoted to the grade of brigadier general on May 10, 1864 after distinguished service at the beginning of the Atlanta campaign. [1] [2] [3] He was severely wounded in the back from concussion of a shell on November 30, 1864 at the Battle of Franklin and apparently saw no further action. [1] [2] [4] No record of his parole has been found. [1] [2]

Aftermath

Scott returned to farming in Louisiana, operating a sugar plantation on the Gulf Coast for some years. [1] [2]

Thomas Moore Scott was found dead in a chair in the Sample Coffee House in New Orleans on April 21, 1876. [1] [2] He died from alcoholic arrest of brain functions. [1] He is interred in Greenwood Cemetery, New Orleans. [1] [2]

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Eicher, John H., and David J. Eicher, Civil War High Commands. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2001. ISBN   0-8047-3641-3. p. 475
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Warner, Ezra J. Generals in Gray: Lives of the Confederate Commanders. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1959. ISBN   0-8071-0823-5. pp. 269-270
  3. 1 2 3 Boatner, Mark Mayo, III. The Civil War Dictionary. New York: McKay, 1988. ISBN   0-8129-1726-X. First published 1959 by McKay. p. 728
  4. Boatner, 1959, p. 728 erroneously states that Scott was mortally wounded at the Battle of Franklin.

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References