Thomas Mackenzie

Last updated

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Brooking, Tom. "Mackenzie, Thomas Noble 1853–1930". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 10 December 2011.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Hall, David Oswald William (1966). "Mackenzie, Sir Thomas, G.C.M.G.". In McLintock, A. H. (ed.). An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand . Ministry for Culture and Heritage / Te Manatū Taonga . Retrieved 21 March 2021.
  3. Wilson 1985, p. 74.
  4. Bassett 1993, p. 209.
  5. Wilson 1985, p. 75.
  6. Bassett 1982, p. 12-13.
  7. Foster, John (1966). "Liberal Party". In McLintock, A. H. (ed.). An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand . Ministry for Culture and Heritage / Te Manatū Taonga . Retrieved 15 December 2015.
  8. Galbreath, Ross. "Ernest Valentine Sanderson". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 27 September 2016.
  9. "Cemeteries search". Dunedin City Council. Retrieved 20 December 2014.
  10. "No. 29423". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 1915. p. 82.
  11. "No. 13609". The Edinburgh Gazette . 29 June 1920. p. 1523.
  12. Hansen, Penelope. "Mackenzie, Clutha Nantes". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 20 December 2014.

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References

Sir Thomas Mackenzie
Thomas Mackenzie.jpg
18th Prime Minister of New Zealand
In office
28 March 1912 10 July 1912
Government offices
Preceded by Prime Minister of New Zealand
1912
Succeeded by
New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Clutha
18871896
Succeeded by
James William Thomson
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Waihemo
19001902
Constituency abolished
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Waikouaiti
19021908
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Taieri
1908–1911
Vacant
Constituence abolished, recreated in 2020
Title next held by
Ingrid Leary
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Egmont
19111912
Succeeded by
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by High Commissioner of New Zealand to the United Kingdom
1912–1920
Succeeded by