Thomas Morgan (of Dderw)

Last updated

Sir
Thomas Morgan
Born(1664-09-07)7 September 1664
Died 16 December 1700(1700-12-16) (aged 36)
Nationality Welsh

Sir Thomas Morgan, JP (7 September 1664 – 16 December 1700) was a Welsh Whig politician of the 17th century.

Welsh people nation and ethnic group native to Wales

The Welsh are a Celtic nation and ethnic group native to, or otherwise associated with, Wales, Welsh culture, Welsh history and the Welsh language. Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom, and the majority of people living in Wales are British citizens.

The eldest son of Sir William Morgan and his first wife Blanche, Morgan inherited his father's estate upon the latter's death in 1680. He married Martha Mansel, by whom he had several children, all of whom predeceased him. [1]

Sir William Morgan was a Welsh landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons of England between 1659 and 1680.

Morgan entered the House of Commons in 1689 as Member of Parliament for Brecon, and was High Sheriff of Monmouthshire the same year. In 1690, he sat as MP for Monmouthshire instead, and continued to be returned there for the rest of his life. He also unseated Jeffrey Jeffreys at Brecon in 1698, who appealed on petition. Before the matter could be resolved, Morgan died of smallpox in 1700. His estates, valued at £7000, went to his brother Sir John Morgan. [2]

Brecon was a parliamentary constituency in Wales which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and its predecessors, from 1542 until it was abolished for the 1885 general election.

Monmouthshire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of Parliament of England from 1536 until 1707, of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1801, and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs).

Smallpox infectious disease that has been eradicated

Smallpox was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, variola major and variola minor. The last naturally occurring case was diagnosed in October 1977 and the World Health Organization (WHO) certified the global eradication of the disease in 1980. The risk of death following contracting the disease was about 30%, with higher rates among babies. Often those who survived had extensive scarring of their skin and some were left blind.

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Charles Morgan may refer to:

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Thomas Morgan may refer to:

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Charles Morgan "of Dderw" was a Welsh politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1763 and 1787.

John Morgan (of Dderw) Welsh politician of Dderw in the 18th century

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Thomas Prothero (1780–1853) was a Welsh lawyer and businessman, known as an opponent of John Frost and a mine owner.

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Pencoed Castle

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References

  1. "Morgan Family History" . Retrieved 2007-10-17.
  2. Williams, William Retlaw (1895). The Parliamentary History of Wales. pp. 25–26, 127. Retrieved 2007-10-17.
Parliament of England
Preceded by
John Jeffreys
Member of Parliament for Brecon
1689–1690
Succeeded by
Jeffrey Jeffreys
Preceded by
Marquess of Worcester
Sir Trevor Williams, Bt
Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire
1690–1700
With: Marquess of Worcester 1690–95
Sir Charles Kemeys, Bt 1695–98
Sir John Williams, Bt 1698–1700
Succeeded by
Sir John Williams, Bt
John Morgan
Preceded by
Jeffrey Jeffreys
Member of Parliament for Brecon
1698–1700
Succeeded by
Jeffrey Jeffreys
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl of Macclesfield
Custos Rotulorum of Monmouthshire
1695–1700
Succeeded by
John Morgan