Thomas Newbould

Last updated

Tommy Newbould
Personal information
Full nameThomas Henry Newbould
Bornfourth ¼ 1880
Wakefield district, England
Died27 October 1964(1964-10-27) (aged 83)
Pontefract district, England
Playing information
Height5 ft 6 in (1.68 m)
Weight12 st 0 lb (76 kg)
Rugby union
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
–1902 Castleford RUFC
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1904 Yorkshire
Rugby league
Position Stand-off, Scrum-half
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1902–19 Wakefield Trinity 365571500436
1919–≥19 York
Total365571500436
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
≤1905–≥10 Yorkshire
1909 England 21003
1910 Great Britain 10000
Source: [1] [2] [3]

Thomas "Tommy" Henry Newbould (birth registered fourth ¼ 1880 [4] – 27 October 1964), also known by the nickname of 'Trapper', was an English rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1900s, 1910s, and 1920s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Yorkshire, and at club level for Castleford Parish Church RFC and Castleford RUFC (in Castleford, Wakefield), [5] and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity (Heritage No. 118) (captain), York and Castleford Rovers as a stand-off or scrum-half, i.e. number 6, or 7. [1]

Contents

Background

Thomas 'Trapper' Newbould's birth was registered in Wakefield district, West Riding of Yorkshire, his death aged 83 was registered in Pontefract district, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, and he is buried at Castleford Cemetery, Healdfield Road, Castleford, West Yorkshire, England.

Playing career

International honours

Tommy 'Trapper' Newbould won caps for England (RL) while at Wakefield Trinity in 1909 against Australia, and Wales, [2] and won caps for Great Britain (RL) while at Wakefield Trinity on the 1910 Great Britain Lions tour of Australia and New Zealand against Australia, and Australasia. [3] [6]

County honours

Tommy 'Trapper' Newbould won caps for Yorkshire (RU) while at Castleford in 1904, [7] and won caps for Yorkshire (RL) while at Wakefield Trinity. [8]

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Tommy 'Trapper' Newbould played scrum-half, and scored the first try in Wakefield Trinity's 17–0 victory over Hull F.C. in the 1909 Challenge Cup Final during the 1908–09 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Tuesday 20 April 1909, in front of a crowd of 23,587. [9]

County Cup Final appearances

Tommy 'Trapper' Newbould played stand-off in Wakefield Trinity's 8–2 victory over Huddersfield in the 1910 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1910–11 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 3 December 1910. [9]

Notable tour matches

Tommy 'Trapper' Newbould played scrum-half in Wakefield Trinity's 5–5 draw with the New Zealand in the tour match at Belle Vue, Wakefield on Wednesday 23 October 1907, and played stand-off, and scored two tries in the 20–13 victory over Australia in the 1908–09 Kangaroo tour of Great Britain match at Belle Vue, Wakefield on Saturday 19 December 1908. [9]

Club career

Tommy 'Trapper' Newbould made his début for Wakefield Trinity on Saturday 22 November 1902. [10] During 1921, and aged 41, he joined Castleford Rovers who had initially played in the Lock Lane area of Castleford, but moved to play near Cutsyke Station, where they played Keighley in the first match of the 1921–22 season, he joined along with the coach Fawcett, a former wing/centre for Leeds, Cole from Keighley, Hirst a stand-off/scrum-half for Harrogate RLFC, and Taylor a forward for Yorkshire and Hull FC, [11] he appears to have scored no drop-goals (or field-goals as they are currently known in Australasia), but prior to the 1974–75 season all goals, whether; conversions, penalties, or drop-goals, scored 2-points, consequently prior to this date drop-goals were often not explicitly documented, therefore '0' drop-goals may indicate drop-goals not recorded, rather than no drop-goals scored. In addition, prior to the 1949–50 season, the archaic field-goal was also still a valid means of scoring points.

Contemporaneous Article Extract

"Joined Trinity from Castleford R.U.F.C., and his partnership with Harry Slater provided Trinity with one of the best half-back combinations in the league. Like fellow tourist H. Kershaw, he played a prominent part in the 1909 N.U. Cup success and played regularly for Yorkshire County. Newbould played in the 1910 Sydney Test." [12]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 18 April 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  3. 1 2 "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 19 April 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  4. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  5. "Castleford RUFC at pitchero.com". pitchero.com. 31 December 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2019.
  6. "Papers Past – Evening Post – 14 May 1910 – Football". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  7. "Honours at castlefordrufc.org". castlefordrufc.org. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  8. Tom Mather (2010). "Best in the Northern Union". Pages 128-142. ISBN   978-1-903659-51-9
  9. 1 2 3 Hoole, Les (2004). Wakefield Trinity RLFC - FIFTY GREAT GAMES. Breedon Books. ISBN   1-85983-429-9
  10. Mike Rylance (22 August 2013). "Trinity: A History of the Wakefield Rugby League Football Club 1872-2013". League Publications Ltd. ISBN   978-1901347289
  11. "Soon after last season started…". 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  12. Lindley, John (1960). Dreadnoughts - A HISTORY OF Wakefield Trinity F. C. 1873 - 1960. John Lindley Son & Co Ltd. ISBN n/a