Thomas P. Grosvenor

Last updated
Thomas P. Grosvenor
Member of the
U.S. House of Representatives
from New York
In office
January 29, 1813 March 3, 1817
Preceded by Robert Le Roy Livingston
Succeeded by Philip J. Schuyler
Constituency 6th district (1813)
5th district (1813–17)
Member of the
New York State Assembly
from Columbia County
In office
July 1, 1810 June 30, 1812
Personal details
Born
Thomas Peabody Grosvenor

(1778-12-20)December 20, 1778
Pomfret, Connecticut
DiedApril 24, 1817(1817-04-24) (aged 38)
Waterloo, Maryland
Political party Federalist
Spouse(s)Mary Jane Hanson
ParentsSeth Grosvenor (1748 - 1808)
Relatives Alexander Contee Hanson (brother-in-law)
Alma mater Yale College
ProfessionLawyer

Thomas Peabody Grosvenor (December 20, 1778 in Pomfret, Windham County, Connecticut April 24, 1817 in Waterloo, Howard County, Maryland) was a United States Representative from New York. [1]

Pomfret, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Pomfret is a town in Windham County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 4,247 in 2010 according to the United States Census. The land was purchased from Native Americans in 1686 and the town was incorporated in 1713 and named after Pontefract in West Yorkshire, England.

Windham County, Connecticut County in the United States

Windham County is a county located in the northeastern corner of the U.S. state of Connecticut. As of the 2010 census, the population was 118,428, making it the least populous county in Connecticut. It forms the core of the region known as the Quiet Corner.

Waterloo (Howard County, Maryland) Unincorporated area in Maryland, United States

Waterloo is an unincorporated community located in Howard County in the state of Maryland in the United States of America. Located at the intersection of Waterloo Road and Washington Boulevard, the neighborhood is encompassed mostly by Jessup and partially by Elkridge.

Contents

Early life

Thomas Peabody Grosvenor was born on December 20, 1778 in Pomfret, Windham County, Connecticut. He was the son of Seth Grosvenor (1748–1808) and the grandson of John Grosvenor (1711–1804) and Hannah Dresser (1711–1782). He pursued classical studies, and graduated from Yale College in 1800, where he was President of the Society of Brothers in Unity. [2] He studied law, was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Hudson, New York. [1]

Yale College undergraduate liberal arts college of Yale University

Yale College is the undergraduate liberal arts college of Yale University. Founded in 1701, it is the original school of the university. Although other schools of the university were founded as early as 1810, all of Yale was officially known as Yale College until 1887, when its schools were confederated and the institution was renamed Yale University.

Brothers in Unity organization

Brothers in Unity is a four-year secret society at Yale University. It used to be a debating society.

Hudson, New York City in New York, United States

Hudson is a city located along the west border of Columbia County, New York, United States. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 6,713, the second-largest in the county, following the nearby town of Kinderhook. Located on the east side of the Hudson River and 120 miles from the Atlantic Ocean, it was named for the river and its namesake explorer Henry Hudson.

Career

In 1799, he wrote to then Maj. Gen. Alexander Hamilton, recommending Mr. Joseph Hickcox to fill in the vacancy in the 13th Regiment of the Army of the United States caused by the vacancy in the line due to James Gordon's new role as Office of the Quarter Master. [3]

Alexander Hamilton first Secretary of the Treasury and Founding Father of the United States

Alexander Hamilton was an American statesman and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. He was an influential interpreter and promoter of the U.S. Constitution, as well as the founder of the nation's financial system, the Federalist Party, the United States Coast Guard, and the New York Post newspaper. As the first Secretary of the Treasury, Hamilton was the main author of the economic policies of George Washington's administration. He took the lead in the Federal government's funding of the states' debts, as well as establishing a national bank, a system of tariffs, and friendly trade relations with Britain. His vision included a strong central government led by a vigorous executive branch, a strong commercial economy, a national bank and support for manufacturing, and a strong military. Thomas Jefferson was his leading opponent, arguing for agrarianism and smaller government.

James Gordon was an Irish-born American merchant, soldier, and politician.

The Quartermaster General of the United States Army is a general officer who is responsible for the Quartermaster Corps, the Quartermaster branch of the U.S. Army. The Quartermaster General does not command Quartermaster units, but is primarily focused on training, doctrine and professional development of Quartermaster soldiers. The Quartermaster General also serves as the Commanding General, U.S. Army Quartermaster Center and School, Fort Lee, Virginia and the traditional Quartermaster Corps. The office of the Quartermaster General was established by resolution of the Continental Congress on 16 June 1775, but the position was not filled until 14 August 1775. Perhaps the most famous Quartermaster General was Nathanael Greene, who was the third Quartermaster General, serving from March 1778 to August 1780. The first Quartermaster General to serve in the U.S. Army was Thomas Mifflin of Pennsylvania.

He was a member of the New York State Assembly from 1810 to 1812, and was District Attorney of the Third District (comprising Columbia, Greene and Rensselaer counties) from 1810 to 1811. [1]

New York State Assembly lower house of the New York State Legislature

The New York State Assembly is the lower house of the New York State Legislature, the New York State Senate being the upper house. There are 150 seats in the Assembly. Assemblymembers serve two-year terms without term limits.

Columbia County, New York County in the United States

Columbia County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 63,096. The county seat is Hudson. The name comes from the Latin feminine form of the name of Christopher Columbus, which was at the time of the formation of the county a popular proposal for the name of the United States of America.

Greene County, New York County in the United States

Greene County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 49,221. Its county seat is Catskill. The county's name is in honor of the American Revolutionary War general Nathanael Greene.

Grosvenor was elected as a Federalist to the 12th United States Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Robert Le Roy Livingston, and was re-elected to the 13th and 14th United States Congresses, serving from January 29, 1813, to March 4, 1817. [1]

12th United States Congress

The Twelfth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1811, to March 4, 1813, during the third and fourth years of James Madison's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Second Census of the United States in 1800. Both chambers had a Democratic-Republican majority.

Robert Le Roy Livingston was a United States Representative from New York.

13th United States Congress

The Thirteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1813, to March 4, 1815, during the fifth and sixth years of James Madison's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Third Census of the United States in 1810. Both chambers had a Democratic-Republican majority. The first two sessions were held at the Capitol building while the third, convened after the Burning of Washington, took place in the First Patent Building.

Later career

Afterwards he engaged in the practice of law in Baltimore, Maryland, but died a month later. [1] Among his papers, was a book he wrote, entitled A Sketch of the Life, last sickness and death, of Mrs. Mary Jane Grosvenor that was published posthumously. [4]

Personal life

In March 1815, he was married to Mary Jane Hanson (1791–1814), the only daughter of Alexander C. Hanson, a lawyer and the Chancellor of Maryland, and the sister of Alexander Contee Hanson (1786–1819), a U.S. Senator. Mary Jane died later that year in 1815 from consumption. [5]

Grosvenor died just fifteen months after his wife, on April 24, 1817, in Waterloo, Maryland, and was buried in Hudson, New York. [6]

See also

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References

Notes
  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "GROSVENOR, Thomas Peabody - Biographical Information". bioguide.congress.gov. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress . Retrieved 16 February 2017.
  2. Unity, Yale University Brothers in. A catalogue of the Society of brothers in unity, Yale college, founded 1768. Hitchcock & Stafford, printers. Retrieved 16 February 2017.
  3. "Founders Online: To Alexander Hamilton from Thomas Grosvenor, 24 April 1799". founders.archives.gov. The National Historical Publications and Records Commission . Retrieved 16 February 2017.
  4. Grosvenor, Thomas Peabody (1817). A sketch of the life, last sickness, and death of Mrs. Mary Jane Grosvenor (2nd ed.). Baltimore: Edward J. Coale and Maxwell. Retrieved 16 February 2017.
  5. "Thomas Peabody Grosvenor (Grosvenor, Thomas Peabody, 1778-1817)". onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu. University of Pennsylvania . Retrieved 16 February 2017.
  6. Thomas Peabody Grosvenor at Find a Grave
Sources
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Robert Le Roy Livingston,
Asa Fitch
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 6th congressional district

1813
with Asa Fitch
Succeeded by
Jonathan Fisk
Preceded by
Thomas B. Cooke
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 5th congressional district

18131817
Succeeded by
Philip J. Schuyler