Thomas Podmore

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Thomas Podmore (1859–1948) was an architect from Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. In addition to his lengthy architectural career as an architect, Podmore is noteworthy for his experiments with the fabrication of concrete products.

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania City and County seat in Pennsylvania, United States

Wilkes-Barre is a city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the county seat of Luzerne County. It is one of the principal cities in the Scranton–Wilkes-Barre–Hazleton, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area. Located at the center of the Wyoming Valley, it is second in size to the nearby city of Scranton. The Scranton–Wilkes-Barre–Hazleton, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area had a population of 563,631 as of the 2010 Census, making it the fourth-largest metro/statistical area in the state of Pennsylvania. Wilkes-Barre and the surrounding Wyoming Valley are framed by the Pocono Mountains to the east, the Endless Mountains to the west, and the Lehigh Valley to the south. The Susquehanna River flows through the center of the valley and defines the northwestern border of the city.

Contents

Early Life

Thomas Podmore was born at Cherrington, Shropshire, England in 1859, the son of a farmer, and was baptized at the nearby village of Tibberton on March 23, 1859. [1] In 1881, he was living on St. Ann Street in Stoke-upon-Trent, Staffordshire, employed as an "architect's assistant." [2]

Career in America

Podmore emigrated to the United States about 1883, worked for a few years in New York, then moved to Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. There, in 1886, he joined forces with Albert Hamilton Kipp (1850–1906) to form the architecture firm Kipp & Podmore. [3] The firm dissolved by mutual consent at the end of 1891. [4]

Albert Hamilton Kipp American architect

Albert Hamilton Kipp was an architect from Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.

In 1903, Podmore received a patent for a "machine for molding concrete blocks" [5] and in 1907 founded the Podmore Concrete Co., for the manufacture of concrete blocks by a method of Podmore's own devising. [6]

Podmore retired in 1928 after the completion of his last building, Sprague Memorial Hall, in Kingston, Pennsylvania. [7] He died in 1948. [8]

Kingston, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

Kingston is a borough in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, United States. It is located on the western bank of the Susquehanna River opposite Wilkes-Barre City. Kingston was first settled in the early 1770s; it was later incorporated as a borough in 1857. As of the 2010 census, the population was 13,182, making it the most populous borough in the county.

Principal Architectural Works

Wyoming Seminary

Wyoming Seminary, founded in 1844, is a Methodist college preparatory school located in the Wyoming Valley of Northeastern Pennsylvania. The "Lower School," which consists of preschool - 8th grade students, is located in Forty Fort. The "Upper School," comprising 9th-grade to postgraduate students, is located in Kingston. It is near the Susquehanna River and the city of Wilkes-Barre. Locally and in some publications, it is sometimes referred to as "Sem." As a boarding school, only Upper School students are given the opportunity to live (board) on campus. Slightly more than one-third of the Upper School student body reside on campus.

Dallas, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

Dallas is a borough in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 2,804 at the 2010 census. The local government describes the borough as the "Pride" of the Back Mountain. The area includes the townships of Dallas, Franklin, Jackson, Kingston, Lake, and Lehman. The region also includes the boroughs of Dallas and Harveys Lake. Dallas is in the vicinity of Misericordia University and Dallas State Correctional Institution.

Plymouth, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

Plymouth is a borough in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, 4 miles (6 km) west of Wilkes-Barre. The population was 5,951 as of the 2010 census.

See also

Architecture of Plymouth, Pennsylvania

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Plymouth, Pennsylvania sits on the west side of Pennsylvania's Wyoming Valley, wedged between the Susquehanna River and the Shawnee Mountain range. Just below the mountain are hills that surround the town and form a natural amphitheater that separates the town from the rest of the valley. Below the hills, the flat lands are formed in the shape of a frying pan, the pan being the Shawnee flats, once the center of the town's agricultural activities, and the handle being a spit of narrow land extending east from the flats, where the center of town is located. At the beginning of the 19th century, Plymouth's primary industry was agriculture. However, vast anthracite coal beds lay below the surface at various depths, and by the 1850s, coal mining became the town's primary occupation.

Plymouth, Pennsylvania sits on the west side of Pennsylvania's Wyoming Valley, wedged between the Susquehanna River and the Shawnee Mountain range. Just below the mountain are hills that surround the town and form a natural amphitheater that separates the town from the rest of the valley. Below the hills, the flat lands are formed in the shape of a frying pan, the pan being the Shawnee flats, once the center of the town's agricultural activities, and the handle being a spit of narrow land extending east from the flats, where the center of town is located. At the beginning of the 19th century, Plymouth's primary industry was agriculture. However, vast anthracite coal beds lay below the surface at various depths, and by the 1850s, coal mining became the town's primary occupation.

At the beginning of the 19th century, Plymouth's primary industry was agriculture, and many of its residents were the descendants of the Connecticut Yankees who first settled the town. Its early architecture resembled that of a small New England village. However, vast anthracite coal beds lay below the surface at various depths, and by the 1850s, coal mining was the town's primary occupation, attracting a more diverse population. After the arrival of the railroad in 1857, the town's architecture became more typical of a growing industrial center.

Frederick J. Amsden was an architect from Scranton, Pennsylvania. He was a veteran of the Civil War with the rank of Captain. He was born at Rome, New York on June 19, 1841, but his father, Joel Amsden, relocated to Scranton in 1850. Frederick J. Amsden died at Scranton on June 5, 1906.

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References

  1. familysearch.org, English Births & Christenings.
  2. familysearch.org, 1881 UK Census, Stoke-upon-Trent.
  3. Wilkes-Barre Record, December 25, 1886, page 1.
  4. Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader, December 26, 1891, page 4.
  5. "Patents," The National Builder, November 1904, page 35.
  6. "Notes of the Industry," Rock Products, Vol. VI, No. 10, April 22, 1907, page 48.
  7. The Wilkes-Barre Record, February 3, 1948, page 13.
  8. Wilkes-Barre Record, August 16, 1948
  9. The Sunday Leader, September 11, 1887, page 8.
  10. Wilkes-Barre Record, June 1, 1939, page 4.
  11. Sunday News, June 8, 1890, page 3.
  12. The Plymouth Tribune, October 16, 1891, page 8.
  13. Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader, October 18, 1893, Page 8.
  14. The Wilkes-Barre Record, October 19, 1896, page 5.
  15. Dollar Weekly News, December 16, 1899, page 3.
  16. Dollar Weekly News, December 16, 1899, page 3.
  17. The Wilkes-Barre Record, December 18, 1899, page 13.
  18. The Wilkes-Barre Record, April 25, 1903, page 7.
  19. The Susquehanna Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church (1917).
  20. Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader, January 27, 1911, page 19.
  21. The Evening News (Wilkes-Barre), December 10, 1918, page 1.
  22. The Evening Journal (Wilmington, Delaware), June 29, 1918, page
  23. The Wilkes-Barre Record, October 4, 1922, page 5.
  24. The Wilkes-Barre Record, March 21, 1928, page 17.