Thomas Pope (disambiguation)

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Thomas Pope (1507–1559) was founder of Trinity College, Oxford.

Thomas Pope English politician and founder of Trinity College, Oxford

Sir Thomas Pope, was a prominent public servant in mid-16th-century England, a Member of Parliament, a wealthy landowner, and the founder of Trinity College, Oxford.

Thomas Pope may also refer to:

Thomas Pope, 2nd Earl of Downe Irish Earl

Thomas Pope, 2nd Earl of Downe (1622–1660) was an English nobleman and Royalist.

Thomas Pope (politician) Canadian politician

Thomas Pope was a Canadian independent politician and served as the eleventh mayor of Quebec City. He was in power from January 22, 1861, to January 29, 1863, before being replaced by Adolphe Guillet dit Tourangeau. He replaced Hector-Louis Langevin and was the city's last non-Francophone mayor.

Thomas A. Pope United States Army Medal of Honor recipient

Thomas A. Pope was a soldier in the United States Army who received the Medal of Honor for his actions while under Australian command in the Battle of Hamel during World War I. For this action, he was also awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal by King George V.

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1823 Year

1823 (MDCCCXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1823rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 823rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 23rd year of the 19th century, and the 4th year of the 1820s decade. As of the start of 1823, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1605 Year

1605 (MDCV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1605th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 605th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1600s decade. As of the start of 1605, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1585 Year

1585 (MDLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1585th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 585th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 16th century, and the 6th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1585, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1724 Year

1724 (MDCCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1724th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 724th year of the 2nd millennium, the 24th year of the 18th century, and the 5th year of the 1720s decade. As of the start of 1724, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1689 Year

1689 (MDCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1689th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 689th year of the 2nd millennium, the 89th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1689, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1667 Year

1667 (MDCLXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1667th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 667th year of the 2nd millennium, the 67th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1667, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1513 Year

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Stephen Name list

Stephen or Steven is a common English first name. It is particularly significant to Christians, as it belonged to Saint Stephen, an early disciple and deacon who, according to the Book of Acts, was stoned to death; he is widely regarded as the first martyr of the Christian Church. The name "Stephen" is derived from Greek Στέφανος (Stéphanos), a first name from the Greek word στέφανος (stéphanos), meaning "wreath, crown" and by extension "reward, honor", from the verb στέφειν (stéphein), "to encircle, to wreathe". In Ancient Greece, crowning wreaths were given to the winners of contests. Originally, as the verb suggests, the noun had a more general meaning of any "circle"—including a circle of people, a circling wall around a city, and, in its earliest recorded use, the circle of a fight, which is found in the Iliad of Homer.

Nicholas male given name

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1825 in Canada

Events from the year 1825 in Canada.

Paschal is used as a name. Paschal, a variant of Pascal, from Latin Paschalis, is an adjective describing Easter or Passover.

1738 in poetry Overview of the events of 1738 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature.

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature.

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature.

Events from the 1340s in England

Events from the 1390s in England.

Events from the year 1679 in England.

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature.

Tyttenhanger House Grade I listed English country house in the United Kingdom

Tyttenhanger House is a 17th-century country mansion, now converted into commercial offices, at Tyttenhanger, near St Albans, Hertfordshire. It is a Grade I listed building.