Thomas Porteous

Last updated
G. Thomas Porteous Jr.
PorteousThomasG.jpg
Porteous at his impeachment trial
Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana
In office
October 11, 1994 December 8, 2010
Appointed by Bill Clinton
Preceded by Robert Frederick Collins
Succeeded by Susie Morgan
Personal details
Born
Gabriel Thomas Porteous Jr.

(1946-12-15) December 15, 1946 (age 72)
New Orleans, Louisiana
Education Louisiana State University (B.A.)
Louisiana State University Law School (J.D.)

Gabriel Thomas Porteous Jr. (born December 15, 1946) [1] is a former United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana. He served for sixteen years before being impeached and removed from office in December 2010.

United States federal judge position in the USA

In the United States, the title of federal judge means a judge appointed by the president of the United States and confirmed by the United States Senate pursuant to the Appointments Clause in Article II of the United States Constitution.

United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana

The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana is a United States federal court based in New Orleans.

Contents

Education and career

Porteous was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. [1] He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Louisiana State University in 1968 and a Juris Doctor from Louisiana State University Law School in 1971. [1] He was a special counsel to the Office of the State Attorney General, Louisiana from 1971 to 1973. He served as Chief of the Felony Complaint Division in the District Attorney's Office, Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, from 1973 to 1975. [1]

A bachelor of arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word baccalaureus should not be confused with baccalaureatus, which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate bachelor of arts with honors degree in some countries.

Louisiana State University university in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA

Louisiana State University is a public research university in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The university was founded in 1853 in what is now known as Pineville, Louisiana, under the name Louisiana State Seminary of Learning & Military Academy. The current LSU main campus was dedicated in 1926, consists of more than 250 buildings constructed in the style of Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio, and the main campus historic district occupies a 650-acre (2.6 km²) plateau on the banks of the Mississippi River.

Juris Doctor graduate-entry professional degree in law

The Juris Doctor degree, also known as the Doctor of Jurisprudence degree, is a graduate-entry professional degree in law and one of several Doctor of Law degrees. The Juris Doctor is earned by completing law school in Australia, Canada, the United States, and some other common law countries. It has the academic standing of a professional doctorate in the United States, a master's degree in Australia, and a second-entry, baccalaureate degree in Canada.

He was in private practice in Gretna from 1973 to 1980, and in Metairie from 1980 to 1984. He was a city attorney of Harahan from 1982 to 1984. He was elected as a judge on the 24th Judicial District Court of Louisiana in 1984 and served until 1994. [1]

Gretna, Louisiana City in Louisiana, United States

Gretna is the second-largest city in and parish seat of Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, United States. Gretna lies on the west bank of the Mississippi River, just east and across the river from uptown New Orleans. It is part of the New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 17,736 at the 2010 census.

Metairie, Louisiana Census-designated place in Louisiana, United States

Metairie is a census-designated place (CDP) in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, United States, and is part of the New Orleans metropolitan area. With a population at the 2010 census of 138,481, Metairie is the largest community in Jefferson Parish and the fifth-largest CDP in the United States. It is an unincorporated area that would be Louisiana's fourth-largest city if it were incorporated. The zip codes that serve the community are 70001–70006.

Harahan, Louisiana City

Harahan is a city in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, United States, and a suburb of New Orleans. The population was 9,277 at the 2010 census.

Federal judicial service

On August 25, 1994, Porteous was nominated by President Bill Clinton to a seat on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana vacated by Robert Frederick Collins. [1] He was confirmed by the United States Senate on October 7, 1994, [1] and received his commission on October 11, 1994. [1]

Bill Clinton 42nd president of the United States

William Jefferson Clinton is an American politician who served as the 42nd president of the United States from 1993 to 2001. Prior to his presidency, he served as governor of Arkansas and as attorney general of Arkansas (1977–1979). A member of the Democratic Party, Clinton was known as a New Democrat, and many of his policies reflected a centrist "Third Way" political philosophy. He is the husband of former Secretary of State and former U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton. In 1998, Clinton was impeached by the House of Representatives. The impeachment was based on accusations that Clinton committed perjury and obstruction of justice for the purpose of concealing his affair with Monica Lewinsky, a 22-year-old White House intern. He was acquitted by the Senate and completed his term in office. Clinton is notable as one of only two U.S. presidents to have been impeached.

Robert Frederick Collins is a former United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana.

United States Senate Upper house of the United States Congress

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which, along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol Building, in Washington, D.C.

Notable rulings

Porteous ruled in several landmark cases against the state, including one 2002 case in which he ruled that the state of Louisiana was illegally using federal money to promote religion in its abstinence-only sex education programs. [2] He ordered the state to stop giving money to individuals or organizations that "convey religious messages or otherwise advance religion" with tax dollars. [2] Judge Porteous also said there was ample evidence that many of the groups participating in the Governor's Program on Abstinence were "furthering religious objectives." [3] Those who supported such groups objected to his ruling.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders.

Religion is a social-cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, morals, worldviews, texts, sanctified places, prophecies, ethics, or organizations, that relates humanity to supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual elements. However, there is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.

Abstinence self-enforced restraint from indulging in bodily activities

Abstinence is a self-enforced restraint from indulging in bodily activities that are widely experienced as giving pleasure. Most frequently, the term refers to sexual abstinence, or abstinence from alcohol, drugs, or food.

Also in 2002, Porteous overturned a federal ban on rave paraphernalia such as glowsticks, pacifiers, and dust masks, originally banned due to the subculture's ties to recreational drugs such as Ecstasy, [4] after the American Civil Liberties Union successfully claimed the ban to be unconstitutional. [4] He had previously ruled in 1999 against a Louisiana law aimed at banning the second trimester abortion procedure known as intact dilation and extraction. [5]

Dust mask A pad held over the nose and mouth to protect against dust

A dust mask is a flexible pad held over the nose and mouth by elastic or rubber straps to protect against dusts encountered during construction or cleaning activities, such as dusts from drywall, brick, wood, fiberglass, silica, or sweeping. A dust mask can also be worn to protect against allergens. A dust mask is worn in the same fashion as a paint mask or surgical mask, but it is dangerous to confuse the three because they each protect against specific airborne dangers. Using the wrong mask for a job can present a significant and possibly deadly danger as many dust masks with widely varied levels of protection may look similar, and even masks that do not protect against dust at all, such as paint masks and surgical masks. Misfitting masks are also a danger as they allow a material to bypass the mask entirely. A correct fit may not be as critical in masks that are intended to protect against splattering liquids or mists. Dust masks are manufactured to protect against only certain dangers, and do not protect against chemicals such as vapors and mists. For this reason, it is dangerous to confuse dust masks with paint masks.

American Civil Liberties Union Legal advocacy organization

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a nonprofit organization whose stated mission is "to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States". Officially nonpartisan, the organization has been supported and criticized by liberal and conservative organizations alike. The ACLU works through litigation and lobbying and it has over 1,200,000 members and an annual budget of over $100 million. Local affiliates of the ACLU are active in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The ACLU provides legal assistance in cases when it considers civil liberties to be at risk. Legal support from the ACLU can take the form of direct legal representation or preparation of amicus curiae briefs expressing legal arguments when another law firm is already providing representation.

Abortion is the ending of a pregnancy by removal or expulsion of an embryo or fetus before it can survive outside the uterus. An abortion that occurs without intervention is known as a miscarriage or spontaneous abortion. When deliberate steps are taken to end a pregnancy, it is called an induced abortion, or less frequently "induced miscarriage". The unmodified word abortion generally refers to an induced abortion. A similar procedure after the fetus has potential to survive outside the womb is known as a "late termination of pregnancy" or less accurately as a "late term abortion".

Bankruptcy

In 2001, Porteous filed for bankruptcy, [6] [7] which led to revelations in the press about his private life, specifically the fact that he was alleged to have had close ties with local bail bond magnate Louis Marcotte III, [6] [7] at the center of a corruption probe. Porteous himself was the subject of investigation by federal investigators. [6] [7]

In May 2006, Porteous, beset by the recent loss of his home due to Hurricane Katrina in August 2005, [6] [7] and the death of his wife a few months later, [6] [7] and still under investigation by a federal grand jury, was granted temporary medical leave and began a year-long furlough from the federal bench. [6] [7]

Impeachment proceedings

On June 18, 2008, the Judicial Conference of the United States transmitted a certificate to the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives expressing the Conference's determination that consideration of impeachment of Porteous might be warranted. [8] The certificate stated that there was substantial evidence that Porteous "repeatedly committed perjury by signing false financial disclosure forms under oath", thus concealing "cash and things of value that he solicited and received from lawyers appearing in litigation before him." [9] In a specific case,

he denied a motion to recuse based on his relationship with lawyers in the case . . . and failed to disclose that the lawyers in question had often provided him with cash. Thereafter, while a bench verdict (that is, a verdict by a judge sitting without a jury) was pending, he solicited and received from the lawyers appearing before him illegal gratuities in the form of cash and other things of value

thus depriving "the public of its right to his honest services". [9] The certificate concluded that this conduct "constituted an abuse of his judicial office" in violation of the Canons of the Code of Conduct for United States Judges. [10]

The certificate also stated that there was substantial evidence that Porteous had "repeatedly committed perjury by signing false financial disclosure forms under oath" in connection with his bankruptcy, allowing "him to obtain a discharge of his debts while continuing his lifestyle at the expense of his creditors". [9] Further, he had "made false representations to gain the extension of a bank loan with the intent to defraud the bank". [10]

Investigation

On September 18, 2008, the House Judiciary Committee voted unanimously to proceed with an investigation of the bribery and perjury allegations. [11] [12] On October 15, 2008 House Judiciary Chair John Conyers announced that Alan I. Barron had been hired as Special Counsel [13] to lead an inquiry into Porteous' impeachment. Representatives Adam Schiff (D-CA) and Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) were designated as Chair and Ranking Member, respectively, to lead the task force conducting the inquiry. [13] Three months later, the House passed via voice vote a Conyers-sponsored resolution authorizing and directing the Committee on the Judiciary to inquire whether the House should impeach Porteous. [14] The resolution was needed because the previous year's investigation had ended with the previous Congress. [15] In October 2009, Reps. Conyers and Lamar S. Smith introduced a resolution [16] asking to access the judge's tax returns as part of the investigation. [17] The resolution was referred to the Rules Committee [16] [17] and, at the same time, a timeframe was established which called for the investigation to end in November 2009; the Judicial Impeachment Task Force would decide by the end of the year if impeachment would be recommended to the Judiciary Committee. If the recommendation was for impeachment, the Committee would take up the matter in early 2010. [17] The task force scheduled the first hearings on the case for November 17 and 18, with more meetings in December before a final recommendation was made. [18]

Impeachment

On November 13 Porteous sued the task force, claiming that the panel was violating his Fifth Amendment rights by using testimony given under immunity in making the case against him. [19] On January 21, 2010, the panel voted unanimously to recommend four articles of impeachment to the full Judiciary Committee, [20] which, on January 27, voted to send the articles of impeachment to the full House. [21] On March 4, 2010, the full Committee reported H.Res. 1031, a resolution of impeachment of Porteous, to the full House. The full House considered the resolution, which included four articles of impeachment, on March 11, 2010. The subjects of the articles of impeachment, and the corresponding vote of the House of Representatives, appear below:

Article I - engaging in a pattern of conduct that is incompatible with the trust and confidence placed in him as a Federal judge - Passed the House by a vote of 412-0. [22]
Article II - engaged in a longstanding pattern of corrupt conduct that demonstrates his unfitness to serve as a United States District Court Judge - Passed the House by a vote of 410-0. [23]
Article III - knowingly and intentionally making false statements, under penalty of perjury, related to his personal bankruptcy filing and violating a bankruptcy court order - Passed the House by a vote of 416-0. [24]
Article IV - knowingly made material false statements about his past to both the United States Senate and to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in order to obtain the office of United States District Court Judge - Passed the House by a vote of 423-0. [25]

The same day, Representatives Adam Schiff (D-CA), Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), Hank Johnson (D-GA), Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), and Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI) were appointed as managers to conduct the trial in the Senate. [26] In addition, Schiff and Goodlatte were designated as the lead managers. [27] The articles of impeachment were sent to the Senate, where the proceedings were started on March 17. [28] On that same day, Senators passed two resolutions: one provided for a summons for Porteous to answer the articles against him, [29] and the other provided for a committee to analyze the evidence against him and report their findings to the full Senate. [30] Senators Claire McCaskill (D-MO) and Orrin Hatch (R-UT) were designated as Chair and Vice Chair of the committee, respectively. [31] The committee met on April 16; The trial was due to begin in early August, with a vote before the Senate happening in late September, but due to delays, it did not begin until mid-September, with a vote scheduled for December 8, 2010. [32]

Trial

On December 7, 2010, the full Senate began hearing the impeachment trial. During the Senate trial for impeachment, Jonathan Turley, acting in Judge Porteous's defense, announced that Judge Porteous had decided to leave the federal bench in 2011 were he not removed from office. On December 8 the Senate voted unanimously to convict Porteous on the first of four impeachment charges, removing him from the bench. The Senate subsequently convicted him on the remaining three articles and moreover disqualified him forever from holding any office of honor or profit under the United States.

Article I - engaging in a pattern of conduct that is incompatible with the trust and confidence placed in him as a Federal judge - Convicted in the Senate by a vote of 96-0. [33]
Article II - engaged in a longstanding pattern of corrupt conduct that demonstrates his unfitness to serve as a United States District Court Judge - Convicted in the Senate by a vote of 69-27. [34]
Article III - knowingly and intentionally making false statements, under penalty of perjury, related to his personal bankruptcy filing and violating a bankruptcy court order - Convicted in the Senate by a vote of 88-8. [35]
Article IV - knowingly made material false statements about his past to both the United States Senate and to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in order to obtain the office of United States District Court Judge - Convicted in the Senate by a vote of 90-6. [36]
Disqualification - Forever disqualified to hold any office of honor or profit under the United States - Disqualified by the Senate by a vote of 94-2. [37] [38]

On January 13, 2011, the Louisiana Supreme Court officially acknowledged the loss of Porteous's state attorney license. [39]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "Porteous, G. Thomas, Jr. - Federal Judicial Center".
  2. 1 2 Finch, Susan; Steve Ritea (2002-07-26). "Judge says religious groups got state abstinence grants - Program ordered to keep closer watch". The Times-Picayune. New Orleans. p. B6. A state program to encourage sexual abstinence among adolescents has given money to individuals and groups that promote religion, a practice that violates the U.S. Constitution, a federal judge decided Thursday. Ruling in a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union, U.S. District Judge G. Thomas Porteous ordered the Governor's Program on Abstinence to stop giving grants to individuals or groups that use the money to convey religious messages "or otherwise advance religion in any way in the course of any event supported in whole or in part" by the program.
  3. Connolly, Ceci (2002-07-26). "Judge Orders Changes In Abstinence Program". Washington Post. Retrieved 2010-04-26. He said there was ample evidence that many of the groups participating in the Governor's Program on Abstinence were "furthering religious objectives
  4. 1 2 Finch, Susan (2002-02-05). "Judge throws out ban on rave gear - Pacifiers, glow sticks are legal". The Times-Picayune. New Orleans. Archived from the original on 2002-06-12. Retrieved 2009-10-09. Banning pacifiers and glow sticks in an effort to curb drug use at all-night raves violates free speech and does not further the government's war on drugs, a federal judge has ruled in permanently blocking federal agents from enforcing the ban. [...] The American Civil Liberties Union, though, said the ban was unconstitutional and challenged it in federal court.
  5. Gyan, Jr, Joe (1999-09-15). "State claims abortion restriction attempt to bar infanticide". The Advocate. Baton Rouge. p. B6. U.S. District Judge G. Thomas Porteous Jr. of New Orleans struck down the dilation and extraction law last March, calling it a "back door effort" to limit a woman's constitutional right to have an abortion. The judge agreed with abortion providers that the '97 law, Act 906, is so vague that it effectively covers any and all abortions.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Broach, Drew; Richard Rainey (2007-12-20). "Court refers Porteous for impeachment". New Orleans Times-Picayune. Retrieved 2009-10-07. Porteous and his wife, Carmella, sought protection from their creditors under Chapter 13 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code in 2001. They filed the case under the names G.T. Ortous and C.A. Ortous with a post office box address in Harvey. Twelve days later, they amended the papers to use their real names. [...] Federal agents initially unearthed Porteous's alleged misconduct during Operation Wrinkled Robe, which largely centered on the influence of a bail bonds company over judges and jailers in Gretna. [...] Porteous returned to the federal bench in June, after spending a year on disability in the wake of losing his house and his wife and enduring the criminal investigation.
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Gordon, Meghan (2007-06-01). "Federal judge returning to bench". New Orleans Times-Picayune. Archived from the original on 2013-02-08. Retrieved 2009-10-07.
  8. Duff, James C. (2008-06-18). "Judicial Conference of the United States Determination" (PDF). Judicial Conference of the United States. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-05-22. Retrieved 2009-08-21. Pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 355(b)(1), the Judicial Conference of the United States certifies to the House of Representatives its determination that consideration of impeachment of United States District Judge G. Thomas Porteous (E.D. La.) may be warranted.
  9. 1 2 3 Duff, James C. (2008-06-18). "Judicial Conference of the United States Determination" (PDF). Judicial Conference of the United States. p. 1. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-05-22. Retrieved 2009-08-21.
  10. 1 2 Duff, James C. (2008-06-18). "Judicial Conference of the United States Determination" (PDF). Judicial Conference of the United States. p. 2. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-05-22. Retrieved 2009-08-21.
  11. Kellman, Laurie (2008-09-17). "House panel moves toward impeaching a judge". USA Today. Associated Press. Archived from the original on 2009-07-21. Retrieved 2009-10-07. (Archived by WebCite at )
  12. Conyers, John, Jr. (2008-09-17). "H. Res. 1448: Authorizing and directing the Committee on the Judiciary to inquire whether the House should impeach G. Thomas Porteous, a judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana". United States House of Representatives. Retrieved 2009-10-07.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  13. 1 2 "House Judiciary Committee Announces Retention of Alan Baron to Lead Inquiry into Possible Impeachment of Judge Porteous" (Press release). U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary. 2008-10-02. Archived from the original on 2009-06-25. Retrieved 2009-06-27.
  14. Conyers, John, Jr. (2009-01-06). "H. Res. 15: Authorizing and directing the Committee on the Judiciary to inquire whether the House should impeach G. Thomas Porteous, a judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana". United States House of Representatives. Retrieved 2009-06-27.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  15. Alpert, Bruce (2009-01-13). "House votes to renew impeachment probe of Judge Porteous". New Orleans Times-Picayune. Retrieved 2009-10-07. The House of Representatives Tuesday authorized its Judiciary Committee to continue its unfinished impeachment investigation of Louisiana federal judge Thomas Porteous. [...] But the committee didn't complete the investigation before the 110th Congress adjourned at the end of 2008 and by rule all impeachment investigations must be authorized by the current Congress.
  16. 1 2 Conyers, John, Jr.; Lamar Smith (2009-09-30). "H. Res. 785: Authorizing the Committee on the Judiciary to inspect and receive certain tax returns and tax return information for the purposes of its investigation into whether United States District Judge G. Thomas Porteous should be impeached, and for other purposes". United States House of Representatives. Retrieved 2009-10-07.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  17. 1 2 3 Alpert, Bruce (2009-10-01). "Federal judge's tax returns sought in probe". New Orleans Times-Picayune. Retrieved 2009-10-07.
  18. Alpert, Bruce (2009-11-12). "Porteous impeachment request to be subject of hearings". New Orleans Times-Picayune. Retrieved 2009-11-14.
  19. Staff reporter (2009-11-13). "Federal judge sues impeachment panel". AP. Archived from the original on 2009-11-14. Retrieved 2009-11-14. (Archived by WebCite at )
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  21. Alpert, Bruce (2010-01-27). "All four articles of impeachment approved against Judge Porteous". New Orleans Times-Picayune. Retrieved 2010-01-27.
  22. Miller, Lorraine C. (2010-03-11). "FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 102". Office of the Clerk. Retrieved 2010-04-24.[ permanent dead link ]
  23. Miller, Lorraine C. (2010-03-11). "FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 103". Office of the Clerk. Retrieved 2010-04-24.
  24. Miller, Lorraine C. (2010-03-11). "FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 104". Office of the Clerk. Retrieved 2010-04-24.
  25. Miller, Lorraine C. (2010-03-11). "FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 105". Office of the Clerk. Retrieved 2010-04-24.
  26. Schiff, Adam B. (2009-06-19). "H. Res. 1165: Appointing and authorizing managers for the impeachment of G. Thomas Porteous, Jr., a Judge for the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana". United States House of Representatives. Retrieved 2009-06-25.
  27. Staff reporter (2010-03-11). "House votes to impeach federal judge from Louisiana". CNN. Retrieved 2010-04-24. After the impeachment vote, Schiff and Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Virginia, were named the lead impeachment managers for the Senate trial, which will decide whether to remove Porteous from the bench. (Archived by WebCite at https://www.webcitation.org/5pE0afpen)
  28. Alpert, Bruce (2010-03-17). "Judge Thomas Porteous impeachment proceedings begin in Senate". New Orleans Times-Picayune. Retrieved 2010-04-24.
  29. Reid, Harry (2009-03-17). "S. Res. 457: A resolution to provide for issuance of a summons and for related procedures concerning the articles of impeachment against G. Thomas Porteous, Jr". United States Senate. Retrieved 2010-04-24.[ permanent dead link ]
  30. Reid, Harry (2009-03-17). "S. Res. 458: A resolution to provide for the appointment of a committee to receive and to report evidence with respect to articles of impeachment against Judge G. Thomas Porteous, Jr". United States Senate. Retrieved 2010-04-24.[ permanent dead link ]
  31. "Senate Leaders Announce Bipartisan Committee To Investigate Judge G. Thomas Porteous" (Press release). Senate Democratic Caucus. 2010-03-17. Archived from the original on 2010-05-05. Retrieved 2010-04-24.
  32. Alpert, Bruce (2010-04-13). "Judge Thomas Porteous will get 'expeditious but fair trial' in Senate". New Orleans Times-Picayune. Retrieved 2010-04-24.
  33. https://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=111&session=2&vote=00261
  34. https://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=111&session=2&vote=00262
  35. https://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=111&session=2&vote=00263
  36. https://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=111&session=2&vote=00264
  37. https://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=111&session=2&vote=00265
  38. Michael A. Memoli (2010-12-09). "Senate convicts Louisiana federal judge in impeachment trial". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2010-12-09. The Senate also voted to bar him from ever holding public office in the future... The vote on the first count was unanimous, 96-0. On subsequent counts, the votes were 69-27, 88-8, and 90-6. Impeachment required a vote of two-thirds of the Senate.
  39. "Thomas Porteous, impeached federal judge, has lost his law license".
Legal offices
Preceded by
Robert Frederick Collins
Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana
1994–2010
Succeeded by
Susie Morgan